2mass-planck-allsky

Digital Object Identifiers

DOIs (Digital Object Identifiers) are persistent data links used to identify data, services or software. Several archives and projects at IPAC have assigned DOIs to existing data sets. See the sections below for a list of DOIs in each archive and contact the archive directly for more details.

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482 DOIs

10.26131/IRSA1 Dataset • December 14, 2009 - February 1, 2011

Wright, Edward L.; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Mainzer, Amy K.; Ressler, Michael E.; Cutri, Roc M.; Jarrett, Thomas; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Padgett, Deborah; McMillan, Robert S.; Skrutskie, Michael; Stanford, S. A.; Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G.; Mather, John C.; Leisawitz, David; Gautier, Thomas N., III; McLean, Ian; Benford, Dominic; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Blain, Andrew; Mendez, Bryan; Irace, William R.; Duval, Valerie; Liu, Fengchuan; Royer, Don; Heinrichsen, Ingolf; Howard, Joan; Shannon, Mark; Kendall, Martha; Walsh, Amy L.; Larsen, Mark; Cardon, Joel G.; Schick, Scott; Schwalm, Mark; Abid, Mohamed; Fabinsky, Beth; Naes, Larry; Tsai, ChaoWei

The AllWISE program builds upon the work of the successful Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) by combining data from the WISE cryogenic and NEOWISE (Mainzer et al. 2011 ApJ, 731, 53) post-cryogenic survey phases to form the most comprehensive view of the full mid-infrared sky currently available. The AllWISE Source Catalog contains accurate positions, apparent motion measurements, four-band (3.4, 4.6, 12, 22 microns) fluxes and flux variability statistics for over 747 million objects detected on the coadded Atlas Images. The added depth and sensitivity, source motion measurements and improved flux variability information in the AllWISE products mean that they supersede the earlier All-Sky Data Release Catalog and Atlas for most uses.

Please include the following standard acknowledgment in any published material that makes use of data products from the primary WISE mission (Image Atlas, Source Catalog, Known Solar System Object Possible Association List):

"This publication makes use of data products from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, which is a joint project of the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration."

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA2 Dataset • 1997-2001

Skrutskie, M. F.; Cutri, R. M.; Stiening, R.; Weinberg, M. D.; Schneider, S.; Carpenter, J. M.; Beichman, C.; Capps, R.; Chester, T.; Elias, J.; Huchra, J.; Liebert, J.; Lonsdale, C.; Monet, D. G.; Price, S.; Seitzer, P.; Jarrett, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Gizis, J. E.; Howard, E.; Evans, T.; Fowler, J.; Fullmer, L.; Hurt, R.; Light, R.; Kopan, E. L.; Marsh, K. A.; McCallon, H. L.; Tam, R.; Van Dyk, S.; Wheelock, S.

The 2MASS project made uniformly-calibrated observations of the entire sky in the J (1.24 µm), H (1.66 µm) and Ks (2.16 µm) near-infrared bands with a pixel size of 2.0 arcsec. Sources brighter than about 1 mJy in each band were detected with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) greater than 10.

2MASS provides:

An unprecedented view of the Milky Way, nearly free of the obscuring effects of interstellar dust, that is revealing the true distribution of luminous mass and thus the largest structures over the extent of the Galaxy.

The first all-sky photometric census of galaxies brighter than Ks=13.5 mag, including galaxies in the 60 degree-wide "Zone of Avoidance," where dust within the Milky Way renders optical galaxy surveys incomplete. The final Catalog of >1,500,000 galaxies provides a rich statistical database, including photometric measurements in three wavelengths and a few structural parameters for large samples of galaxies in differing environments, measured at wavelengths which are sensitive to the stellar populations dominating the luminous mass.

The statistical basis to search for rare, but astrophysically important, objects, which are either cool, and thus extremely red (e.g., extremely low-luminosity stars and brown dwarfs), or heavily obscured at optical wavelengths (e.g., dust-obscured AGNs and globular clusters located in the Galactic plane).

Please include the following standard acknowledgment in any published material that makes use of 2MASS data products:

"This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation."

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA3 Dataset • Cryogenic Release 3 • Dec 2003 to May 2009

Capak; Peter

The Spitzer Science Center and IRSA have released a set of Enhanced Imaging Products (SEIP) from the Spitzer Heritage Archive. These include Super Mosaics (combining data from multiple programs where appropriate) and a Source List of photometry for compact sources. The primary requirement on the Source List is very high reliability -- with areal coverage, completeness, and limiting depth being secondary considerations. The SEIP include data from the four channels of IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8 microns) and the 24 micron channel of MIPS. The full set of products for the Spitzer cryogenic mission includes around 42 million sources.

Cryogenic Release 3 includes Spitzer data taken during commissioning and cryogenic operations (Dec 2003 to May 2009), including calibration data.

To ensure high reliability, strict cuts are placed on extracted sources, and some legitimate sources may appear to be missing. These sources are removed by cuts in size, compactness, blending, shape, and SNR, along with multi-band detection requirements. In most fields, the completeness of the source list is well matched to expectations for a SNR=10 cut off. However, in extremely difficult regions, the list may be highly incomplete, especially in areas of high surface brightness and/or high source surface density (e.g. galactic star forming regions, the areas around bright sources, and areas in extended nearby galaxies).

Please include the following standard acknowledgment in any published material that makes use of this data product:

"This work is based [in part] on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA."

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA4 Dataset • 1983 January 26 - 1983 November 22

Neugebauer, G.; Habing, H. J.; van Duinen, R.; Aumann, H. H.; Baud, B.; Beichman, C. A.; Beintema, D. A.; Boggess, N.; Clegg, P. E.; de Jong, T.; Emerson, J. P.; Gautier, T. N.; Gillett, F. C.; Harris, S.; Hauser, M. G.; Houck, J. R.; Jennings, R. E.; Low, F. J.; Marsden, P. L.; Miley, G.; Olnon, F. M.; Pottasch, S. R.; Raimond, E.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Soifer, B. T.; Walker, R. G.; Wesselius, P. R.; Young, E.

The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) was a joint project of the US, UK and the Netherlands. The IRAS mission performed an unbiased, sensitive all sky survey at 12, 25, 60 and 100 microns. The Point Source Catalog includes 245,889 well-confirmed point sources, i.e., sources with angular extents less than approximately 0.5', 0.5', 1.0', and 2.0' in the in-scan direction at 12, 25, 60, and 100 micron, respectively. Positions, flux densities, uncertainties, associations with known astronomical objects and various cautionary flags are given for each object. Away from confused regions of the sky, the survey is complete to about 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, and 1.0 Jy at 12, 25, 60, and 100 micron. Typical position uncertainties are about 2" to 6" in-scan and about 8" to 16" cross-scan.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA5 Dataset • Sep 2013 - Mar 2015

Lotz, J. M.; Koekemoer, A.; Coe, D.; Grogin, N.; Capak, P.; Mack, J.; Anderson, J.; Avila, R.; Barker, E. A.; Borncamp, D.; Brammer, G.; Durbin, M.; Gunning, H.; Hilbert, B.; Jenkner, H.; Khandrika, H.; Levay, Z.; Lucas, R. A.; MacKenty, J.; Ogaz, S.; Porterfield, B.; Reid, N.; Robberto, M.; Royle, P.; Smith, L. J.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Sunnquist, B.; Surace, J.; Taylor, D. C.; Williams, R.; Bullock, J.; Dickinson, M.; Finkelstein, S.; Natarajan, P.; Richard, J.; Robertson, B.; Tumlinson, J.; Zitrin, A.; Flanagan, K.; Sembach, K.; Soifer, B. T.; Mountain, M.

The Frontier Fields is a Spitzer and HST Director's Discretionary program of six deep fields centered on strong lensing galaxy clusters in parallel with six deep "blank fields". The second release of the Spitzer Frontier Fields data comprises the Director's Discretionary Time (DDT) and public archival data available for the Frontier Fields clusters as of Dec 1, 2015. These are the deepest observations of clusters and their lensed galaxies ever obtained by Spitzer, and the second deepest observations of blank fields.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA6 Dataset

K. Sandstrom

A GALEX+WISE matched resolution image atlas for around 10,000 nearby galaxies.This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA7 Dataset

R. M. Rich

HERON used a dedicated 0.7-m telescope to image the haloes of 119 galaxies in the Local Volume to surface brightnesses of 28-30 mag/arcsec^2. The sample is primarily from the Two Micron All Sky Survey Large Galaxy Atlas and extended to include nearby dwarf galaxies and more distant giant ellipticals, and spans fully the galaxy color-magnitude diagram including the blue cloud and red sequence.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA8 Dataset

Steve Price (PI, Air Force Research Laboratory); Mike Egan (AFRL); Sean Carey (Boston College); Don Mizuno (BC); Tom Kuchar (BC); Dale Sinclair (AFRL)

The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX), a Ballistic Missile Defense Organization satellite, was launched in April 1996. The first ten months of the mission were devoted to mid-infrared observations with a solid hydrogen-cooled telescope. This instrument had five line-scanned focal plane arrays that spanned the spectral region from 4.2 to 26 microns.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA9 Dataset

MSX team

Version 2.3 of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) Point Source Catalog (PSC), which supercedes the version (1.2) that was released in 1999, contains over 100,000 more sources than the previous version. The photometry is based on co-added image plates, as opposed to single-scan data, which results in improved sensitivity and hence reliability in the fluxes. Comparison with Tycho-2 positions indicates that the astrometric accuracy of the new catalog is more than 1'' better than that in Version 1.2. In addition to the Galactic plane, Areas Missed by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), and the Large Magellanic Cloud, which were included in the previous catalog, Version 2.3 includes data from the Small Magellanic Cloud, eight nearby galaxies, and several molecular clouds and star forming regions.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA10 Dataset

The IRAS Sky Survey Atlas (ISSA) is a survey of 98% of the sky in four bands with effective wavelengths of 12, 25, 60 and 100 microns, which was done during a ten month period from January to November, 1983. The ISSA covers the sky with 430 fields. Each field is a 12.5 deg. by 12.5 deg. region centered every 10 deg. along declination bands which are spaced 10 deg. apart.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA11 Dataset

IPAC

The Faint Source Survey (FSS) is the definitive IRAS data set for faint point sources. The FSS was produced by point-source filtering the individual detector data streams and then coadding those data streams using a trimmed-average algorithm. The resulting images, or plates, give the best estimate from the IRAS survey data of the point source flux density at every surveyed point of the sky. The Faint Source Catalog (FSC) is a compilation of the sources extracted from the FSS plates that have met reasonable reliability requirements. Averaged over the whole catalog, the FSC is at least 98.5% reliable at 12 and 25 microns, and ~94% at 60 microns. For comparison, the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC) is > 99.997% reliable, but the sensitivity of the FSC exceeds that of the PSC by about a factor of 2.5. The FSC contains data for 173,044 point sources in unconfused regions with flux densities typically greater than 0.2 Jy at 12, 25, and 60 microns and greater than 1.0 Jy at 100 microns.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA12 Dataset

Gaia Collaboration

The Gaia DR2 Source Catalogue contains positions and brightnesses for 1.693 billion stars, including distances and proper motions for more than 1.3 billion stars. For more details, see the Gaia documentation, particularly the Source Catalogue columns description.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA13 Dataset

BLAST team

The Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a

2-m telescope that conducted the first wide-area (> many square

degrees) sub-mm surveys at wavelengths 250--500 um. Built and flown by

an international collaboration headed by the University of

Pennsylvania (P.I. Mark Devlin), the telescope uses a prototype of the

SPIRE camera for the Herschel satellite. Despite parts of this band

being available to ground-based telescopes from high-altitude sites

such as Mauna Kea (e.g. JCMT) and Chile (e.g. future ALMA site), BLAST

surveys are currently un-matched in sensitivity and area given the

comparatively negligible atmospheric water vapour at 38 km

altitude.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA14 Dataset

Gaia Collaboration

This table has an entry for all sources in the auxiliary QSO solution matched to the ICRF2 sources and passing all quality filters discussed in the corresponding documentation.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA15 Dataset

Gaia Collaboration

This table is a subset of gaia_source comprising those stars in the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 Catalogues for which a full 5-parameter astrometric solution has been possible in Gaia Data Release 1. This is possible because the early Hipparcos epoch positions break some degeneracies due to the limited Gaia time coverage. This table contains a substantial fraction of the around 2.5 million stars in the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogue. Many stars have been excluded due to several reasons, such as saturation, cross-match errors or bad astrometric solution.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA16 Dataset

Gaia Collaboration

Gaia is a mission designed to chart a three dimensional map of the Milky Way. Gaia will provide unprecedented positional measurements for about one billion stars in our Galaxy, together with radial velocity measurements for the brightest 150 million objects.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA17 Dataset

Zacharias et al.

UCAC4 is a compiled, all-sky star catalog covering mainly the 8 to 16 magnitude range in a single bandpass between V and R. Positional errors are about 15 to 20 mas for stars in the 10 to 14 mag range. Proper motions have been derived for most of the about 113 million stars utilizing about 140 other star catalogs with significant epoch difference to the UCAC CCD observations. These data are supplemented by 2MASS photometric data for about 110 million stars and 5-band (B,V,g,r,i) photometry from the APASS (AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey) for over 50 million stars. UCAC4 also contains error estimates and various flags. All bright stars not observed with the astrograph have been added to UCAC4 from a set of Hipparcos and Tycho-2 stars. Thus UCAC4 should be complete from the brightest stars to about R=16, with the source of data indicated in flags.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA18 Dataset

Monet et al.

This all-sky catalog, described in Monet et al. (2003), consists of positions, proper motions, magnitudes, and other measured quantities for 1,045,175,762 objects. The data were derived from digitizing scans of almost 7,500 photographic plates taken from various sky surveys during the interval from 1949 to 2002. The originating plate material includes five complete coverages of the northern sky and four of the southern sky.

To be included in the catalog, an object must have been detected on two different surveys because isolated, single-survey detections are unreliable. For the earlier USNO-A catalog (which was essentially a two-color, one-epoch catalog), this meant that the object must have had detectable fluxes on both the red and blue plates, and this led to the exclusion of many faint objects with non-neutral colors. Also, the larger epoch difference in the southern survey coverage meant that objects with larger proper motions tended to be excluded. USNO-B1.0 attempts to fix both of these problems. An object detected in the same band at two epochs will be included in USNO-B1.0, as will objects that have significant proper motions, although it is still the case that objects with large motions and extreme colors may be omitted. The selection algorithm requires that spatially coincident detections must be made on any two of the surveys for an object to be classified as real and be included in the catalog.

The catalog is expected to be complete down to V=21. Estimated positional accuracies are 0.2 arcsec, photographic magnitude accuracies are 0.3 mag, and the accuracy for distinguishing stars from non-stellar objects is 85%.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA19 Dataset

Zacharias et al. (2015)

URAT is a follow-up project to the successful UCAC project using the same astrograph but with a much larger focal plane array and a bandpass shifted further to the red. Longer integration times and more sensitive, backside CCDs allowed for a substantial increase in limiting magnitude, resulting in about 4-fold increase in the average number of stars per square degree as compared to UCAC. Additional observations with an objective grating largely extend the dynamic range to include observations of stars as bright as about 3rd magnitude. Multiple sky overlaps per year result in a significant improvement in positional precision as compared to UCAC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA20 Dataset

USNO

The US Naval Observatory (USNO) has a long history of providing accurate astrometric data for millions of stars from their own observations plus other data. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) project utiized the "redlens" 20 cm aperture astrograph in an all-sky observing program between 1997 and 2004 (CTIO in the south, NOFS in the north) with a limiting magnitude of about R = 16.5. The previous release, UCAC4, became available in 2012. The 1st Gaia data release provides proper motions for only about 2 million stars (TGAS subset of the Tycho-2 stars) in the mainly 6 to 11.5 magnitude range. Gaia DR2 which will contain proper motions of about a billion stars is scheduled for release in April 2018. In the meantime the astronomical community would benefit from proper motions of millions of stars fainter than the Tycho-2 limit, if a substantial improvement in precision and accuraccy could be made beyond what was available in the pre-Gaia era. Re-reduction of UCAC + combine with Gaia DR1 provides proper motions for over 107 million stars on the 1 to 5 mas/yr level, strongly depending on magnitude. UCAC observations (mean epoch 2001) provide positions with 10 to 70 mas precision, and about 14 years of epoch difference to Gaia DR1.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA21 Dataset

IRSA

This is IRSA's implementation of the VO Table Access Protocol (TAP). Our TAP service allows a rich variety of searches against IRSA's varied holdings.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA22 Dataset

IRSA

This is IRSA's implementation of version 2 of the IVOA Simple Image Access (SIA) protocol. Our SIA v2 service allows a rich variety of searches against IRSA's varied holdings.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA23 Dataset

Harvey et al. (2013)

The Auriga-California molecular cloud is a large region of relatively modest star formation that is part of the Gould Belt. The "Auriga-California Molecular Cloud" (ACMC) Herschel program observed a 14.5 square degree area in five far-infrared bands.

The ACMC catalog provides photometry for the 60 point-like and very compact sources in each band: PACS 70 and 160 microns, SPIRE 250, 350, and 500 microns.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA24 Dataset

Hi-GAL team

The Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) covers the Galactic plane at five wavelengths from 70 to 500 microns. Hi-GAL DR1 is limited to the inner Milky Way in the longitude range +68d > l > -70d and latitude range 1d > b > -1d. The generation of the Hi-GAL photometric catalogs is discussed in detail in Molinari et al. (2016).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA25 Dataset

Hi-GAL team

The Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) covers the Galactic plane at five wavelengths from 70 to 500 microns. Hi-GAL DR1 is limited to the inner Milky Way in the longitude range +68d > l > -70d and latitude range 1d > b > -1d. The generation of the Hi-GAL photometric catalogs is discussed in detail in Molinari et al. (2016).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA26 Dataset

Hi-GAL team

The Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) covers the Galactic plane at five wavelengths from 70 to 500 microns. Hi-GAL DR1 is limited to the inner Milky Way in the longitude range +68d > l > -70d and latitude range 1d > b > -1d. The generation of the Hi-GAL photometric catalogs is discussed in detail in Molinari et al. (2016).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA27 Dataset

Hi-GAL team

The Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) covers the Galactic plane at five wavelengths from 70 to 500 microns. Hi-GAL DR1 is limited to the inner Milky Way in the longitude range +68d > l > -70d and latitude range 1d > b > -1d. The generation of the Hi-GAL photometric catalogs is discussed in detail in Molinari et al. (2016).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA28 Dataset

Hi-GAL team

The Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) covers the Galactic plane at five wavelengths from 70 to 500 microns. Hi-GAL DR1 is limited to the inner Milky Way in the longitude range +68d > l > -70d and latitude range 1d > b > -1d. The generation of the Hi-GAL photometric catalogs is discussed in detail in Molinari et al. (2016).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA29 Dataset

PEP team

The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP, Lutz et al. 2011) is a Herschel guaranteed time deep extragalactic survey (KPGT_dlutz_1) targeting six among the most popular "blank fields", ten lensing clusters of galaxies, and two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 100, and 160 microns. PEP includes SPIRE observations of the two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 250, 350, and 500 microns. SPIRE coverage of all other fields is available from the HerMES survey (Oliver et al. 2010). In addition, deep SPIRE GOODS-N data are provided by the GOODS-Herschel program (Elbaz et al. 2011).

PEP used the Starfinder IDL code (Diolaiti et al. 2000a,b) to blindly extract the PACS catalogs, by means of PSF-fitting. PEP adopted the "direct" noise maps and extracted PSFs directly from the observed maps (see documentation). The released catalogs include all sources above a S/N threshold of 3 sigma, derived directly from the measured fluxes and flux uncertainties. Users should keep in mind that the error estimate does not take into account confusion noise. PEP recommends to use any flux below 0.6 mJy in the green band and below 2.0 mJy in the red band with care.

The GOODS-S 70 micron catalog omits the Field and Flag_PGH_* columns, and coverage has units of s/pix.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA30 Dataset

PEP team

The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP, Lutz et al. 2011) is a Herschel guaranteed time deep extragalactic survey (KPGT_dlutz_1) targeting six among the most popular "blank fields", ten lensing clusters of galaxies, and two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 100, and 160 microns. PEP includes SPIRE observations of the two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 250, 350, and 500 microns. SPIRE coverage of all other fields is available from the HerMES survey (Oliver et al. 2010). In addition, deep SPIRE GOODS-N data are provided by the GOODS-Herschel program (Elbaz et al. 2011).

The PACS blind catalogs extracted using Starfinder have been matched to the available 24 micron source lists by means of a maximum likelihood analysis (Ciliegi et al. 2001; Sutherland & Saunders 1992), taking advantage of the available 24 micron fluxes. See the documentation for details.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA31 Dataset

PEP team

The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP, Lutz et al. 2011) is a Herschel guaranteed time deep extragalactic survey (KPGT_dlutz_1) targeting six among the most popular "blank fields", ten lensing clusters of galaxies, and two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 100, and 160 microns. PEP includes SPIRE observations of the two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 250, 350, and 500 microns. SPIRE coverage of all other fields is available from the HerMES survey (Oliver et al. 2010). In addition, deep SPIRE GOODS-N data are provided by the GOODS-Herschel program (Elbaz et al. 2011).

PEP used the Starfinder IDL code (Diolaiti et al. 2000a,b) to blindly extract the PACS catalogs, by means of PSF-fitting. PEP adopted the "direct" noise maps and extracted PSFs directly from the observed maps (see documentation). The released catalogs include all sources above a S/N threshold of 3 sigma, derived directly from the measured fluxes and flux uncertainties. Users should keep in mind that the error estimate does not take into account confusion noise. PEP recommends to use any flux below 0.6 mJy in the green band and below 2.0 mJy in the red band with care.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA32 Dataset

PEP team

The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP, Lutz et al. 2011) is a Herschel guaranteed time deep extragalactic survey (KPGT_dlutz_1) targeting six among the most popular "blank fields", ten lensing clusters of galaxies, and two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 100, and 160 microns. PEP includes SPIRE observations of the two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 250, 350, and 500 microns. SPIRE coverage of all other fields is available from the HerMES survey (Oliver et al. 2010). In addition, deep SPIRE GOODS-N data are provided by the GOODS-Herschel program (Elbaz et al. 2011).

In addition to the blind catalogs extracted with Starfinder, PEP also provides a catalog obtained using 24 micron position priors and PSF-fitting. The catalogs of priors used for each blank field are listed in Table 16 of the documentation, and are mostly based on an extraction driven by IRAC source positions. Priors extraction of PACS fluxes is obtained following the method described in Magnelli et al. (2009). Users should keep in mind that the error estimate does not take into account confusion noise. PEP recommends to use any flux below 0.6 mJy in the green band and below 2.0 mJy in the red band with care.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA33 Dataset

PEP team

The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP, Lutz et al. 2011) is a Herschel guaranteed time deep extragalactic survey (KPGT_dlutz_1) targeting six among the most popular "blank fields", ten lensing clusters of galaxies, and two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 100, and 160 microns. PEP includes SPIRE observations of the two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 250, 350, and 500 microns. SPIRE coverage of all other fields is available from the HerMES survey (Oliver et al. 2010). In addition, deep SPIRE GOODS-N data are provided by the GOODS-Herschel program (Elbaz et al. 2011).

PEP used the Starfinder IDL code (Diolaiti et al. 2000a,b) to blindly extract the PACS catalogs, by means of PSF-fitting. PEP adopted the "direct" noise maps and extracted PSFs directly from the observed maps (see documentation). The released catalogs include all sources above a S/N threshold of 3 sigma, derived directly from the measured fluxes and flux uncertainties. Users should keep in mind that the error estimate does not take into account confusion noise. PEP recommends to use any flux below 0.6 mJy in the green band and below 2.0 mJy in the red band with care.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA34 Dataset

PEP team

The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP, Lutz et al. 2011) is a Herschel guaranteed time deep extragalactic survey (KPGT_dlutz_1) targeting six among the most popular "blank fields", ten lensing clusters of galaxies, and two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 100, and 160 microns. PEP includes SPIRE observations of the two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 250, 350, and 500 microns. SPIRE coverage of all other fields is available from the HerMES survey (Oliver et al. 2010). In addition, deep SPIRE GOODS-N data are provided by the GOODS-Herschel program (Elbaz et al. 2011).

PEP used the Starfinder IDL code (Diolaiti et al. 2000a,b) to blindly extract the PACS catalogs, by means of PSF-fitting. PEP adopted the "direct" noise maps and extracted PSFs directly from the observed maps (see documentation). The released catalogs include all sources above a S/N threshold of 3 sigma, derived directly from the measured fluxes and flux uncertainties. Users should keep in mind that the error estimate does not take into account confusion noise. PEP recommends to use any flux below 0.6 mJy in the green band and below 2.0 mJy in the red band with care.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA35 Dataset

PEP team

The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP, Lutz et al. 2011) is a Herschel guaranteed time deep extragalactic survey (KPGT_dlutz_1) targeting six among the most popular "blank fields", ten lensing clusters of galaxies, and two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 100, and 160 microns. PEP includes SPIRE observations of the two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 250, 350, and 500 microns. SPIRE coverage of all other fields is available from the HerMES survey (Oliver et al. 2010). In addition, deep SPIRE GOODS-N data are provided by the GOODS-Herschel program (Elbaz et al. 2011).

The list of 24 micron priors adopted in the LH field belongs to a preliminary, private catalog, soon to be replaced by an official public release (E. Egami, January 29th 2013, private communication). The PEP DR1 data package includes this catalog, providing cross-IDs between the list of priors and the new 24 micron catalog soon to become public. See the documentation for more information.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA36 Dataset

PEP team

The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP, Lutz et al. 2011) is a Herschel guaranteed time deep extragalactic survey (KPGT_dlutz_1) targeting six among the most popular "blank fields", ten lensing clusters of galaxies, and two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 100, and 160 microns. PEP includes SPIRE observations of the two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 250, 350, and 500 microns. SPIRE coverage of all other fields is available from the HerMES survey (Oliver et al. 2010). In addition, deep SPIRE GOODS-N data are provided by the GOODS-Herschel program (Elbaz et al. 2011).

PEP used the Starfinder IDL code (Diolaiti et al. 2000a,b) to blindly extract the PACS catalogs, by means of PSF-fitting. PEP adopted the "direct" noise maps and extracted PSFs directly from the observed maps (see documentation). The released catalogs include all sources above a S/N threshold of 3 sigma, derived directly from the measured fluxes and flux uncertainties. Users should keep in mind that the error estimate does not take into account confusion noise. PEP recommends to use any flux below 0.6 mJy in the green band and below 2.0 mJy in the red band with care.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA37 Dataset

PEP team

The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP, Lutz et al. 2011) is a Herschel guaranteed time deep extragalactic survey (KPGT_dlutz_1) targeting six among the most popular "blank fields", ten lensing clusters of galaxies, and two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 100, and 160 microns. PEP includes SPIRE observations of the two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 250, 350, and 500 microns. SPIRE coverage of all other fields is available from the HerMES survey (Oliver et al. 2010). In addition, deep SPIRE GOODS-N data are provided by the GOODS-Herschel program (Elbaz et al. 2011).

PEP used the Starfinder IDL code (Diolaiti et al. 2000a,b) to blindly extract the PACS catalogs, by means of PSF-fitting. PEP adopted the "direct" noise maps and extracted PSFs directly from the observed maps (see documentation). The released catalogs include all sources above a S/N threshold of 3 sigma, derived directly from the measured fluxes and flux uncertainties. Users should keep in mind that the error estimate does not take into account confusion noise. PEP recommends to use any flux below 0.6 mJy in the green band and below 2.0 mJy in the red band with care.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA38 Dataset

H-ATLAS team

The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) is a survey of 600 deg^2 in five photometric bands - 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 microns - with the Photoconductor Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) cameras. H-ATLAS DR1 includes the survey of three fields on the celestial equator, covering a total area of 161.6 deg^2 and previously observed in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) spectroscopic survey. The data release main catalogue (HATLAS_DR1_CATALOGUE.FITS) contains only the 'best' candidate ID to each SPIRE source (where available). Most users will find in this catalogue everything they will need for their science purposes. A second catalogue is also available (HATLAS_DR1_CATALOGUE_ALLIDS.FITS), which contains all possible counterparts within the search radius of each SPIRE source, and provides the full LR statistics so that these may be independently analysed as the user wishes. To select only sources which have reliable optical IDs, a cut of Reliability#0.8 is recommended, although other cuts on Reliability or LR may be suitable for different purposes as discussed in Bourne et al. (2016).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA39 Dataset

H-ATLAS team

The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) is a survey of 600 deg^2 in five photometric bands - 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 microns - with the Photoconductor Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) cameras. H-ATLAS DR1 includes the survey of three fields on the celestial equator, covering a total area of 161.6 deg^2 and previously observed in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) spectroscopic survey. The data release main catalogue (HATLAS_DR1_CATALOGUE.FITS) contains only the 'best' candidate ID to each SPIRE source (where available). Most users will find in this catalogue everything they will need for their science purposes. A second catalogue is also available (HATLAS_DR1_CATALOGUE_ALLIDS.FITS), which contains all possible counterparts within the search radius of each SPIRE source, and provides the full LR statistics so that these may be independently analysed as the user wishes. To select only sources which have reliable optical IDs, a cut of Reliability#0.8 is recommended, although other cuts on Reliability or LR may be suitable for different purposes as discussed in Bourne et al. (2016).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA40 Dataset

GOODS team

GOODS-Herschel (Elbaz et al, 2011) is in ESA open time key project consisting of the deepest Herschel observations of the two Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields in the Northern and Southern hemispheres.

The GOODS catalogs include photometry from Spitzer IRAC & MIPS and Herschel PACS & SPIRE observations.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA41 Dataset

GOODS team

GOODS-Herschel (Elbaz et al, 2011) is in ESA open time key project consisting of the deepest Herschel observations of the two Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields in the Northern and Southern hemispheres.

The GOODS catalogs include photometry from Spitzer IRAC & MIPS and Herschel PACS & SPIRE observations.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA42 Dataset

HOPS team

The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS, KPOT_tmegeath_2) is a sample of 410 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Orion molecular clouds, selected from Spitzer data. Most objects have near-infrared photometry from 2MASS, mid- and far-infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel, and submillimeter photometry from APEX; thus, the SEDs cover 1.2 - 870 microns and are used to classify the sample into protostellar classes. Of the 410 YSOs, 330 have Spitzer and Herschel data and are mostly protostars; the remaining objects include likely extragalactic contaminants and faint YSOs. Using mid-IR spectral indices and bolometric temperatures, the sample of 330 YSOs is classified into 92 Class 0 protostars, 125 Class I protostars, 102 flat-spectrum sources, and 11 Class II re-main-sequence stars. HOPS also implements a simple protostellar model (including a disk in an infalling envelope with outflow cavities) to generate a grid of 30,400 model SEDs and uses it to determine the best-fit model parameters for each protostar.

This table contains the 2MASS, Spitzer, Herschel, and APEX source fluxes, as well as the rebinned IRS fluxes, of the 410 HOPS sources. Note that not every source has data at all of these wavelengths.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA43 Dataset

HOPS team

The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS, KPOT_tmegeath_2) is a sample of 410 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Orion molecular clouds, selected from Spitzer data. Most objects have near-infrared photometry from 2MASS, mid- and far-infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel, and submillimeter photometry from APEX; thus, the SEDs cover 1.2 - 870 microns and are used to classify the sample into protostellar classes. Of the 410 YSOs, 330 have Spitzer and Herschel data and are mostly protostars; the remaining objects include likely extragalactic contaminants and faint YSOs. Using mid-IR spectral indices and bolometric temperatures, the sample of 330 YSOs is classified into 92 Class 0 protostars, 125 Class I protostars, 102 flat-spectrum sources, and 11 Class II re-main-sequence stars. HOPS also implements a simple protostellar model (including a disk in an infalling envelope with outflow cavities) to generate a grid of 30,400 model SEDs and uses it to determine the best-fit model parameters for each protostar.

This table contains the SED class, bolometric luminosity and temperature, mid-IR spectral index, and best-fit model parameters for the 330 YSOs with Spitzer and Herschel data.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA44 Dataset

NHSC

The Herschel-SPIRE instrument mapped about 9% of the sky in Submillimeter broad-band filters centered at 250, 350, and 500 microns (1199, 857, 600 GHz) with spatial resolutions of 17.9", 24.2", 35.4" respectively. In total, we used the 6878 standard configuration scan maps that are available, including calibration observations. The SPIRE Point Source Catalog contains the result of a systematic and homogeneous source extraction on those maps using 4 different photometry extraction methods. Only regions affected by strong Galactic emission, mostly in the Galactic Plane, were excluded, as they tested the limits of the available source extraction methods. Aimed primarily at point sources, that allow for the best photometric accuracy, the catalog contains also significant fractions of slightly extended sources up to a limit. With most SPIRE maps being confusion limited, uncertainties in flux densities were established as a function of structure noise and flux density, based on the results of artificial source insertion experiments into real data along a range of celestial backgrounds. Many sources have been rejected that do not pass the imposed SNR threshold, especially at flux densities approaching the extragalactic confusion limit. A range of additional flags provide information on the reliability of the flux information, as well as the spatial extent and orientation of a source. Users are encouraged to check the flux density estimates of all 4 methods and follow the guidelines given in the Explanatory Supplement regarding their interpretation for point- and extended sources. For tracing back catalog objects to the originally contributing detections in SPIRE observations, a cross identification table is available that provides the relevant observation identifiers used by the Herschel Science Archive. For further details on catalog construction, detailed content, and validation, please see the Explanatory Supplement.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA45 Dataset

NHSC

The Herschel-SPIRE instrument mapped about 9% of the sky in Submillimeter broad-band filters centered at 250, 350, and 500 microns (1199, 857, 600 GHz) with spatial resolutions of 17.9", 24.2", 35.4" respectively. In total, we used the 6878 standard configuration scan maps that are available, including calibration observations. The SPIRE Point Source Catalog contains the result of a systematic and homogeneous source extraction on those maps using 4 different photometry extraction methods. Only regions affected by strong Galactic emission, mostly in the Galactic Plane, were excluded, as they tested the limits of the available source extraction methods. Aimed primarily at point sources, that allow for the best photometric accuracy, the catalog contains also significant fractions of slightly extended sources up to a limit. With most SPIRE maps being confusion limited, uncertainties in flux densities were established as a function of structure noise and flux density, based on the results of artificial source insertion experiments into real data along a range of celestial backgrounds. Many sources have been rejected that do not pass the imposed SNR threshold, especially at flux densities approaching the extragalactic confusion limit. A range of additional flags provide information on the reliability of the flux information, as well as the spatial extent and orientation of a source. Users are encouraged to check the flux density estimates of all 4 methods and follow the guidelines given in the Explanatory Supplement regarding their interpretation for point- and extended sources. For tracing back catalog objects to the originally contributing detections in SPIRE observations, a cross identification table is available that provides the relevant observation identifiers used by the Herschel Science Archive. For further details on catalog construction, detailed content, and validation, please see the Explanatory Supplement.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA46 Dataset

NHSC

The Herschel-SPIRE instrument mapped about 9% of the sky in Submillimeter broad-band filters centered at 250, 350, and 500 microns (1199, 857, 600 GHz) with spatial resolutions of 17.9", 24.2", 35.4" respectively. In total, we used the 6878 standard configuration scan maps that are available, including calibration observations. The SPIRE Point Source Catalog contains the result of a systematic and homogeneous source extraction on those maps using 4 different photometry extraction methods. Only regions affected by strong Galactic emission, mostly in the Galactic Plane, were excluded, as they tested the limits of the available source extraction methods. Aimed primarily at point sources, that allow for the best photometric accuracy, the catalog contains also significant fractions of slightly extended sources up to a limit. With most SPIRE maps being confusion limited, uncertainties in flux densities were established as a function of structure noise and flux density, based on the results of artificial source insertion experiments into real data along a range of celestial backgrounds. Many sources have been rejected that do not pass the imposed SNR threshold, especially at flux densities approaching the extragalactic confusion limit. A range of additional flags provide information on the reliability of the flux information, as well as the spatial extent and orientation of a source. Users are encouraged to check the flux density estimates of all 4 methods and follow the guidelines given in the Explanatory Supplement regarding their interpretation for point- and extended sources. For tracing back catalog objects to the originally contributing detections in SPIRE observations, a cross identification table is available that provides the relevant observation identifiers used by the Herschel Science Archive. For further details on catalog construction, detailed content, and validation, please see the Explanatory Supplement.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA47 Dataset

HerMES team

The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) is a legacy programme (KPGT_soliver1) designed to map a set of nested fields totalling 380 sq. deg. Fields range in size from 0.01 to 20 sq. deg., using SPIRE at 250, 350 and 500 microns. These bands cover the peak of the redshifted thermal spectral energy distribution from interstellar dust and thus capture the reprocessed optical and ultraviolet radiation from star formation that has been absorbed by dust, and are critical for forming a complete multiwavelength understanding of galaxy formation and evolution.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA48 Dataset

HerMES team

The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) is a legacy programme (KPGT_soliver1) designed to map a set of nested fields totalling 380 sq. deg. Fields range in size from 0.01 to 20 sq. deg., using SPIRE at 250, 350 and 500 microns. These bands cover the peak of the redshifted thermal spectral energy distribution from interstellar dust and thus capture the reprocessed optical and ultraviolet radiation from star formation that has been absorbed by dust, and are critical for forming a complete multiwavelength understanding of galaxy formation and evolution.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA49 Dataset

HerMES team

The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) is a legacy programme (KPGT_soliver1) designed to map a set of nested fields totalling 380 sq. deg. Fields range in size from 0.01 to 20 sq. deg., using SPIRE at 250, 350 and 500 microns. These bands cover the peak of the redshifted thermal spectral energy distribution from interstellar dust and thus capture the reprocessed optical and ultraviolet radiation from star formation that has been absorbed by dust, and are critical for forming a complete multiwavelength understanding of galaxy formation and evolution.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA50 Dataset

HerMES team

The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) is a legacy programme (KPGT_soliver1) designed to map a set of nested fields totalling 380 sq. deg. Fields range in size from 0.01 to 20 sq. deg., using SPIRE at 250, 350 and 500 microns. These bands cover the peak of the redshifted thermal spectral energy distribution from interstellar dust and thus capture the reprocessed optical and ultraviolet radiation from star formation that has been absorbed by dust, and are critical for forming a complete multiwavelength understanding of galaxy formation and evolution.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA51 Dataset

HerMES team

The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) is a legacy programme (KPGT_soliver1) designed to map a set of nested fields totalling 380 sq. deg. Fields range in size from 0.01 to 20 sq. deg., using SPIRE at 250, 350 and 500 microns. These bands cover the peak of the redshifted thermal spectral energy distribution from interstellar dust and thus capture the reprocessed optical and ultraviolet radiation from star formation that has been absorbed by dust, and are critical for forming a complete multiwavelength understanding of galaxy formation and evolution.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA52 Dataset

HerMES team

The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) is a legacy programme (KPGT_soliver1) designed to map a set of nested fields totalling 380 sq. deg. Fields range in size from 0.01 to 20 sq. deg., using SPIRE at 250, 350 and 500 microns. These bands cover the peak of the redshifted thermal spectral energy distribution from interstellar dust and thus capture the reprocessed optical and ultraviolet radiation from star formation that has been absorbed by dust, and are critical for forming a complete multiwavelength understanding of galaxy formation and evolution.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA53 Dataset

HerMES team

The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) is a legacy programme (KPGT_soliver1) designed to map a set of nested fields totalling 380 sq. deg. Fields range in size from 0.01 to 20 sq. deg., using SPIRE at 250, 350 and 500 microns. These bands cover the peak of the redshifted thermal spectral energy distribution from interstellar dust and thus capture the reprocessed optical and ultraviolet radiation from star formation that has been absorbed by dust, and are critical for forming a complete multiwavelength understanding of galaxy formation and evolution.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA54 Dataset

HerMES team

The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) is a legacy programme (KPGT_soliver1) designed to map a set of nested fields totalling 380 sq. deg. Fields range in size from 0.01 to 20 sq. deg., using SPIRE at 250, 350 and 500 microns. These bands cover the peak of the redshifted thermal spectral energy distribution from interstellar dust and thus capture the reprocessed optical and ultraviolet radiation from star formation that has been absorbed by dust, and are critical for forming a complete multiwavelength understanding of galaxy formation and evolution.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA55 Dataset

DUNES team

DUst around NEarby Stars (DUNES, Eiroa et al. 2013) is a Herschel open time deep key program to perform a deep and systematic survey for faint, cold debris disks. A sample of 133 nearby (d<25 pc) main sequence stars between 0.2 and 2 solar masses were observed with PACS and SPIRE.

The DUNES catalog provides Herschel photometry, links to the Herschel images and SED plot, as well as quantities from ancillary data and other missions.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA56 Dataset

HERITAGE team

The HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) open time key program mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns using Herschel's PACS and SPIRE instruments. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA57 Dataset

HERITAGE team

The HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) open time key program mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns using Herschel's PACS and SPIRE instruments. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA58 Dataset

Seale et al. (2014)

Observations from the HERschel Inventory of the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) have been used to identify dusty populations of sources in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC).

The study used the HERITAGE catalogs of point sources from both the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS; 100 and 160 microns) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE; 250, 350, and 500 microns) cameras. These catalogs are matched to each other to create a Herschel band-merged catalog and then further matched to archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS catalogs from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) and SAGE-SMC surveys to create single mid- to far-infrared (far-IR) point source catalogs that span the wavelength range from 3.6 to 500 microns. There are 35,322 unique sources in the LMC and 7503 in the SMC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA59 Dataset

HERITAGE team

The HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) open time key program mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns using Herschel's PACS and SPIRE instruments. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA60 Dataset

Seale et al. (2014)

Observations from the HERschel Inventory of the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) have been used to identify dusty populations of sources in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC).

The study used the HERITAGE catalogs of point sources from both the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS; 100 and 160 microns) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE; 250, 350, and 500 microns) cameras. These catalogs are matched to each other to create a Herschel band-merged catalog and then further matched to archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS catalogs from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) and SAGE-SMC surveys to create single mid- to far-infrared (far-IR) point source catalogs that span the wavelength range from 3.6 to 500 microns. There are 35,322 unique sources in the LMC and 7503 in the SMC.

The Band-Matched Classification Tables identify matches to literature catalogs of previously classified LMC and SMC objects.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA61 Dataset

HERITAGE team

The HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) open time key program mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns using Herschel's PACS and SPIRE instruments. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA62 Dataset

HERITAGE team

The HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) open time key program mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns using Herschel's PACS and SPIRE instruments. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA63 Dataset

HERITAGE team

The HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) open time key program mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns using Herschel's PACS and SPIRE instruments. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA64 Dataset

HERITAGE team

The HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) open time key program mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns using Herschel's PACS and SPIRE instruments. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA65 Dataset

HERITAGE team

The HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) open time key program mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns using Herschel's PACS and SPIRE instruments. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA66 Dataset

HERITAGE team

The HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) open time key program mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns using Herschel's PACS and SPIRE instruments. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA67 Dataset

HERITAGE team

The HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) open time key program mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns using Herschel's PACS and SPIRE instruments. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA68 Dataset

Seale et al. (2014)

Observations from the HERschel Inventory of the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) have been used to identify dusty populations of sources in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC).

The study used the HERITAGE catalogs of point sources from both the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS; 100 and 160 microns) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE; 250, 350, and 500 microns) cameras. These catalogs are matched to each other to create a Herschel band-merged catalog and then further matched to archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS catalogs from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) and SAGE-SMC surveys to create single mid- to far-infrared (far-IR) point source catalogs that span the wavelength range from 3.6 to 500 microns. There are 35,322 unique sources in the LMC and 7503 in the SMC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA69 Dataset

Seale et al. (2014)

Observations from the HERschel Inventory of the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) have been used to identify dusty populations of sources in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC).

The study used the HERITAGE catalogs of point sources from both the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS; 100 and 160 microns) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE; 250, 350, and 500 microns) cameras. These catalogs are matched to each other to create a Herschel band-merged catalog and then further matched to archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS catalogs from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) and SAGE-SMC surveys to create single mid- to far-infrared (far-IR) point source catalogs that span the wavelength range from 3.6 to 500 microns. There are 35,322 unique sources in the LMC and 7503 in the SMC.

The Band-Matched Classification Tables identify matches to literature catalogs of previously classified LMC and SMC objects.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA70 Dataset

HeVICS team

HeViCS is a survey of about 55 sq deg of the nearby Virgo galaxy cluster, obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory using the instruments PACS and SPIRE in parallel mode. It provides a wavelength coverage in five bands from about 100 to 600 microns. The science goals include: a) The detection of dust in the intra-cluster medium, b) Extended cold dust around galaxies, c) FIR-submm luminosity functions, d) The UV to sub-mm spectral energy distribution of galaxies of various morphological types, e) The detection of dust in dwarf and giant elliptical galaxies.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA71 Dataset

KINGFISH team

KINGFISH is an imaging and spectroscopic survey of 61 nearby (d<30 Mpc) galaxies, chosen to cover a wide range of galaxy properties and local interstellar medium (ISM) environments found in the nearby universe. Its broad goals are to characterize the ISM of present-day galaxies, the heating and cooling of their gaseous and dust components, and to better understand the physical processes linking star formation and the ISM.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA72 Dataset

HGBS team

The Herschel Gould Belt Survey is one of the largest Herschel Key Projects. It conducted extensive far-infrared and submillimeter mapping of nearby molecular clouds with both the SPIRE and PACS instruments. It covered the bulk of the nearest (d <= 0.5 kpc) cloud complexes in the Galaxy, which are mostly located in the Gould Belt, a giant (700 pc by 1000 pc), flat structure inclined by 20d to the Galactic plane.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA73 Dataset

Harvey et al. (2013)

The Auriga-California molecular cloud is a large region of relatively modest star formation that is part of the Gould Belt. The Herschel Space Observatory program OT1_pharvey01_3 ("The Auriga-California Molecular Cloud: A Massive Nearby Cloud With Powerful Diagnostics For Early Stages of Star Formation", PI Paul Harvey) observed a 14.5 square degree area of the cloud in five far-infrared bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA74 Dataset

Groenewegen et al. (2011)

Herschel data from the "Mass-loss of Evolved StarS" (MESS) Guaranteed-Time Key Program are available here. IRSA is serving the MESS PACS imaging of 108 evolved stars. This is Herschel program KPGT_mgroen01_1.

The sample of AGB stars has been selected to cover all chemical types (M-, S-, C-stars), variability types (irregular, semi-regular, Miras) and periods, and mass-loss rates. Stars have been selected to have high IRAS fluxes and low background levels.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA75 Dataset

Fritz et al. (2012)

HELGA observed Andromeda on a 5.5x2.5 degree field, an area ~4.5 larger with respect to any previous IR observations, with SPIRE and PACS fast scan Parallel Mode, thus obtaining the most complete FIR survey of this galaxy both in terms of spatial mapping and spectral coverage.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA76 Dataset

HERITAGE team

The HERschel Inventory of The Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) open time key program mapped the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns using Herschel's PACS and SPIRE instruments. The overriding science goal of HERITAGE is to study the life cycle of matter as traced by dust in the LMC and SMC.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA77 Dataset

SAG-4 team

The goal of the "Evolution of interstellar dust" guaranteed time key project (PI: A. Abergel & A. Zavagno) is to explore with Herschel the far-infrared (FIR) to submillimeter (submm) emission properties of dust particles in a wide range of regions within our Galaxy, from very diffuse clouds to sites of star formation and proto-stars. Photometric data taken with SPIRE and PACS are complemented with spectroscopy using the FTS of SPIRE and PACS to derive the physical conditions of the gas from the lines of [CI], the high-level rotational lines of CO, and the major cooling lines of [CII] and [OI].

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA78 Dataset

HerMES team

The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) is a legacy programme (KPGT_soliver1) designed to map a set of nested fields totalling 380 sq. deg. Fields range in size from 0.01 to 20 sq. deg., using SPIRE at 250, 350 and 500 microns. These bands cover the peak of the redshifted thermal spectral energy distribution from interstellar dust and thus capture the reprocessed optical and ultraviolet radiation from star formation that has been absorbed by dust, and are critical for forming a complete multiwavelength understanding of galaxy formation and evolution.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA79 Dataset

HSA

The Herschel High Level Images (HHLI) are a subset of the data in the Herschel Science Archive (HSA), the entire contents of which are accessible at IRSA through the Herschel Data Search tool. The HHLI represent PACS and SPIRE image products that have been processed to the highest level available through the Standard Product Generation (SPG) pipeline, version 14.0. They are provided here as a convenient way for users to quickly visualize PACS and SPIRE imaging for any given region on the sky observed by these two instruments.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA80 Dataset

DUNES team

The DUst around NEarby Stars (DUNES, Eiroa et al. 2013) Herschel Open Time Key Program (KPOT_ceiroa_1) is a survey of 133 stars in 130 fields with the Herschel/PACS photometer. All target stars were observed with the PACS 100 and 160 micron filters. A subset of stars were additionally observed with the PACS 70 micron filter and the SPIRE 250, 350 and 500 micron filters.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA81 Dataset

VNGS team

The Very Nearby Galaxy Survey (VNGS) is a Herschel Key Program (KPGT_cwilso01_1) to measure the emission spectrum from dust as well as important cooling lines from the gaseous interstellar medium in a sample of 13 very nearby galaxies (M51, M81, NGC2403, NGC891, M83, M82, Arp220, NGC4038/39, NGC1068, NGC4151, CenA, NGC4125, and NGC205). These galaxies have been chosen to probe as wide a region in galaxy parameter space as possible while maximizing the achievable spatial resolution and are already well-studied from X-ray and optical through to radio wavelengths. The far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths probed by Herschel are absolutely crucial for understanding the physical processes and properties of the interstellar medium, the interplay between star formation and the interstellar medium in galaxies, and how they may depend on the wider galaxian environment.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA82 Dataset

PHPDP team

All Herschel observations are processed through an automatic pipeline, which corrects a number of instrumental artifacts. The Highly Processed Data Products (HPDP) have gone through additional interactive processing, and represent an improvement over the standard products. HPDP from Herschel's Photoconductor Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) are available for JScanam maps, Unimap maps, and Red Leak Spectra.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA83 Dataset

PEP team

The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP, Lutz et al. 2011) is a Herschel guaranteed time deep extragalactic survey (KPGT_dlutz_1) targeting six among the most popular "blank fields", ten lensing clusters of galaxies, and two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 100 and 160 microns. PEP includes SPIRE observations of the two z ~1 clusters at wavelengths of 250, 350, and 500 microns. SPIRE coverage of all other fields is available from the HerMES survey (Oliver et al. 2010). In addition, deep SPIRE GOODS-N data are provided by the GOODS-Herschel program (Elbaz et al. 2011).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA84 Dataset

H-ATLAS team

The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) is a survey of 600 deg^2 in five photometric bands - 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 microns - with the Photoconductor Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) cameras. H-ATLAS DR1 includes the survey of three fields on the celestial equator, covering a total area of 161.6 deg^2 and previously observed in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) spectroscopic survey.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA85 Dataset

Exter et al.

Herschel far-infrared imaging and spectroscopy were taken at several epochs to probe the central point source and the extended environment of the stellar outburst object V838 Monocerotis.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA86 Dataset

HerM33es team

Herschel PACS and SPIRE images of M33

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA87 Dataset

HOPS team

The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS, KPOT_tmegeath_2) is a sample of 410 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Orion molecular clouds, selected from Spitzer data. Most objects have near-infrared photometry from 2MASS, mid- and far-infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel, and submillimeter photometry from APEX; thus, the SEDs cover 1.2 - 870 microns and are used to classify the sample into protostellar classes. Of the 410 YSOs, 330 have Spitzer and Herschel data and are mostly protostars; the remaining objects include likely extragalactic contaminants and faint YSOs. Using mid-IR spectral indices and bolometric temperatures, the sample of 330 YSOs is classified into 92 Class 0 protostars, 125 Class I protostars, 102 flat-spectrum sources, and 11 Class II pre-main-sequence stars. HOPS also implements a simple protostellar model (including a disk in an infalling envelope with outflow cavities) to generate a grid of 30,400 model SEDs and uses it to determine the best-fit model parameters for each protostar.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA88 Dataset

Morris et al.

Herschel's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) produced far-infrared spectral maps. HIFI data products automatically processed with the Standard Product Generation (SPG) pipeline are available through the Herschel Data Search. In contrast, the HIFI Highly Processed Data Products (HPDPs) available here have been produced by HIFI instrument scientists using the Herschel Interactive Processing Environment (HIPE), and can be regarded as being as close to science-ready as possible. HPDPs are available for observations taken in the On-The-Fly (OTF) and Dual Beam Switch (DBS) Raster modes during science programs and calibration campaigns, over the Routine and Check-Out phases. The first HPDP delivery (DR1, Nov. 2016) consists of Band 6 and 7 maps.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA89 Dataset

Cold Cores team

Herschel Data from the "Galactic Cold Cores: A Herschel Survey of the Source Populations Revealed by Planck" (Cold Cores) Open-Time Key Program are available here. IRSA is serving the Cold Cores imaging of 115 PACS and 116 SPIRE fields containing Planck cold dust detections. This is Herschel program KPOT_mjuvela_1.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA90 Dataset

GOODS team

The Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) aims to unite extremely deep observations from NASA's Great Observatories (Spitzer, Hubble and Chandra), ESA's Herschel and XMM-Newton, and the most powerful ground-based facilities. The aim is to survey the distant universe to the faintest flux limits across the broadest range of wavelengths.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA91 Dataset

IRSA

This is IRSA's implementation of the IVOA Simple Spectral Access (SSA) protocol. Our SSA service allows a rich variety of searches against IRSA's varied holdings.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA92 Dataset

Charles R. Kerton as part of the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey

The Extended IRAS Galaxy Atlas (EIGA) is an extension of the original IRAS Galaxy Atlas (IGA) to b = 6.7 deg.. High resolution images at 60 microns and 100 microns have been produced to match the latitude coverage of radio continuum observations obtained as part of the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS). Also associated with the EIGA and IGA is the Mid-Infrared Galaxy Atlas (MIGA).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA93 Dataset

HIRES Project at IRSA

The IRAS Galaxy Atlas (IGA) is a high resolution image atlas of the Galactic plane at 60 and 100 microns, it has been produced using the IRAS satellite data. The HIRES program was developed by the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) to produce high resolution (~ 1 arcmin) images from IRAS data using the Maximum Correlation Method (H.H. Aumann, J.W. Fowler and M. Melnyk, 1990, Astronomical Journal, 99, 1674).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA94 Dataset

Miville-Deschenes & Lagache

This new generation of IRAS images, called IRIS, benefits from better zodiacal light subtraction, calibration and zero levels compatible with DIRBE, and better destriping. At 100 microns, the IRIS product is also a significant improvement over the Schlegel et al. (1998) maps. IRIS keeps the full ISSA resolution, includes well calibrated point sources, and the diffuse emission calibration at scales smaller than 1 degree was corrected for the variation of the IRAS detector responsivity with scale and brightness. The uncertainty on the IRIS calibration and zero levels is dominated by the uncertainty of the DIRBE calibration and the accuracy of the zodiacal light model.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA95 Dataset

Charles R. Kerton as part of the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey

The Mid-Infrared Galaxy Atlas (MIGA) is a high resolution image atlas of the Galactic plane at 12 microns and 25 microns, it has been produced using the HIRES processed infrared data from the IRAS satellite. It is a counterpart to the far-infrared IRAS Galaxy Atlas (IGA) and the Extended IRAS Galaxy Atlas (EIGA).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA96 Dataset

Roeser, Demleitner, & Schilbach

PPMXL is a catalog of positions, proper motions, 2MASS- and optical photometry of 900 million stars and galaxies, aiming to be complete down to about V=20 full-sky. It is the result of a re-reduction of USNO-B1 together with 2MASS to the ICRS as represented by PPMX.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA97 Dataset

Two-Micron All Sky Survey Science Team

2MASS has uniformly scanned the entire sky in three near-infrared bands to detect and characterize point sources brighter than about 1 mJy in each band, with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) greater than 1.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA98 Dataset

2MASS team

The 2MASS Survey Point and Extended Source "Reject" Tables (PSRT and XSRT) contain the 843,988,897 point and 943,441 extended source measurements from the Survey WDBs that were not selected for inclusion in the All-Sky Release Catalogs. The characteristics of entries in the Reject Tables differs between scans that were and were not selected for inclusion in the All-Sky Release:

In the 10,981 survey scans that were not selected for the All-Sky Release, the Reject Tables contain all point and extended source extractions. These include reliable detections of real astrophysical sources, spurious extractions of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) events, image artifacts and transients such as cosmic rays and meteor trails.

In the 59,731 survey scans that were selected for the All-Sky Release, the Reject Tables contain only those extractions from the Survey WDBs that did not satisfy the source selection criteria used to construct the uniform and reliable All-Sky Release Catalogs. These include detections of faint sources and noise events that are below the Catalog flux and SNR thresholds, and spurious detections of image artifacts and transients. The Reject Tables also contain detections of brighter sources in the overlap regions between adjacent tiles that were removed during the Catalog multiple detection resolution process.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA99 Dataset

2MASS team

The 2MASS Large Galaxy Atlas consists of galaxies ranging in size from 2 to 30 arcmin, with a typical resolution of ~3 arcsec (w/ 1 arcsec pixels) in the 2MASS IR bands (J, H, Ks). The completed atlas provides the aggregate flux for each galaxy and a detailed view of the infrared morphology.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA100 Dataset

2MASS team

Photometric calibration for 2MASS was performed using observations of calibration fields made at regular intervals during each night of survey operations. Measurements of standard stars in the fields were used to derive the photometric zero point offsets as a function of time during each night. Atmospheric extinction coefficients were derived from 2MASS observations made over long periods.

2MASS calibration fields, or tiles, are 1° long in declination and approximately 8.5' wide in right ascension. There are 35 regular survey calibration fields distributed at approximately two hour intervals in right ascension near declinations of approximately -30°, 0° and +30°. An additional five calibration fields were defined in and around the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to support the deep observation (6x) campaign towards the end of survey operations.

Over the course of the survey, the regular calibration fields were scanned between 562 and 3692 times in nominally photometric conditions. Equatorial fields were observed from both observatories, so were observed more frequently than those near ±30° which were observed with only one telescope. The special Magellanic Cloud calibration fields were observed 108 to 468 times between November 2000 and February 2001.

The following table contains brief descriptions of the entries in the Survey, 6x and Calibration Merged Point Source Information Tables. The merged source tables contain the mean positions magnitudes and uncertainties for sources detected multiple times in each of the 2MASS data sets. The merging was carried out using an autocorrelation of the respective databases to identify groups of extractions that are positionally associated with each other, all lying within a 1.5" radius circular region. A number of confirmation statistics are also provided in the tables that can be used to test for source motion and/or variability, and the general quality of the merge.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA101 Dataset

2MASS team

The merged source tables contain the mean positions magnitudes and uncertainties for sources detected multiple times in each of the 2MASS data sets. The merging was carried out using an autocorrelation of the respective databases to identify groups of extractions that are positionally associated with each other, all lying within a 1.5" radius circular region. A number of confirmation statistics are also provided in the tables that can be used to test for source motion and/or variability, and the general quality of the merge.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA102 Dataset

2MASS team

During the final months of 2MASS observatory operations, a campaign of targeted "long exposure" observations was carried out during times when no previously unscanned parts of the sky were available for the main survey. These observations used the same freeze-frame scanning technique employed for the survey, but with READ2-READ1 exposures six times longer than was used for normal survey observations (hence they are referred to as "6x" observations). The 2MASS 6x measurements were intended to probe ~1 magnitude deeper than the main survey in unconfused regions.

Approximately 590 deg2 of sky distributed in 30 targeted regions were scanned at least once using the long exposures. Most of this area is concentrated in two large, comprehensive surveys of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, 383 deg2 and 127 deg2, respectively. Twenty-eight additional smaller fields were mapped in the 6x mode from both observatories, covering targets that include the Pleiades open cluster, galactic star formation complexes, M31, nearby galaxy clusters and the Lockman Hole.

Data processing produced a 6x Image Atlas and 6x point and extended source Working Databases (6x-PSWDB and 6x-XSWDB), analogous to those from the main survey. "Catalogs" of point and extended source detections (6x-PSC and 6x-XSC) that represent uniform, higher reliability single-epoch snapshots of the near infrared sky were drawn from the 6x WDBs using SNR and quality criteria similar to those used to construct the All-Sky Release PSC and XSC (A3.6.c). The 6x-PSC and 6x-XSC have not received the same level of scrutiny and validation as the 2MASS All-Sky PSC and XSC, though.

Unlike the All-Sky Release Catalogs, the 6x Catalogs are not released as separate tables. The 6x Point and Extended Source Catalogs are instead integrated into the respective 6x Point and Extended Source WDBs. Sources comprising the Catalogs are denoted in the WDBs with the cat flag, and have cat="1".

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA103 Dataset

2MASS team

During the final months of 2MASS observatory operations, a campaign of targeted "long exposure" observations was carried out during times when no previously unscanned parts of the sky were available for the main survey. These observations used the same freeze-frame scanning technique employed for the survey, but with READ2-READ1 exposures six times longer than was used for normal survey observations (hence they are referred to as "6x" observations). The 2MASS 6x measurements were intended to probe ~1 magnitude deeper than the main survey in unconfused regions.

Approximately 590 deg2 of sky distributed in 30 targeted regions were scanned at least once using the long exposures. Most of this area is concentrated in two large, comprehensive surveys of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, 383 deg2 and 127 deg2, respectively. Twenty-eight additional smaller fields were mapped in the 6x mode from both observatories, covering targets that include the Pleiades open cluster, galactic star formation complexes, M31, nearby galaxy clusters and the Lockman Hole.

Data processing produced a 6x Image Atlas and 6x point and extended source Working Databases (6x-PSWDB and 6x-XSWDB), analogous to those from the main survey. "Catalogs" of point and extended source detections (6x-PSC and 6x-XSC) that represent uniform, higher reliability single-epoch snapshots of the near infrared sky were drawn from the 6x WDBs using SNR and quality criteria similar to those used to construct the All-Sky Release PSC and XSC (A3.6.c). The 6x-PSC and 6x-XSC have not received the same level of scrutiny and validation as the 2MASS All-Sky PSC and XSC, though.

Unlike the All-Sky Release Catalogs, the 6x Catalogs are not released as separate tables. The 6x Point and Extended Source Catalogs are instead integrated into the respective 6x Point and Extended Source WDBs. Sources comprising the Catalogs are denoted in the WDBs with the cat flag, and have cat="1".

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA104 Dataset

2MASS team

Photometric calibration for 2MASS was performed using observations of calibration fields made at regular intervals during each night of survey operations. Measurements of standard stars in the fields were used to derive the photometric zero point offsets as a function of time during each night. Atmospheric extinction coefficients were derived from 2MASS observations made over long periods.

2MASS calibration fields, or tiles, are 1° long in declination and approximately 8.5' wide in right ascension. There are 35 regular survey calibration fields distributed at approximately two hour intervals in right ascension near declinations of approximately -30°, 0° and +30°. An additional five calibration fields were defined in and around the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to support the deep observation (6x) campaign towards the end of survey operations.

Over the course of the survey, the regular calibration fields were scanned between 562 and 3692 times in nominally photometric conditions. Equatorial fields were observed from both observatories, so were observed more frequently than those near ±30° which were observed with only one telescope. The special Magellanic Cloud calibration fields were observed 108 to 468 times between November 2000 and February 2001.

The Combined Calibration Field Source Table contains the positions, aperture photometry, uncertainties, quality flags and cross-references to entries in the All-Sky Point and Extended Source Catalogs.

A source was required to be detected on both the combined north-going and south-going images to be included in the extracted source database for a field. The positions and photometry provided are the average values measured on the north- and south-going combined images.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA105 Dataset

2MASS team

Photometric calibration for 2MASS was performed using observations of calibration fields made at regular intervals during each night of survey operations. Measurements of standard stars in the fields were used to derive the photometric zero point offsets as a function of time during each night. Atmospheric extinction coefficients were derived from 2MASS observations made over long periods.

2MASS calibration fields, or tiles, are 1° long in declination and approximately 8.5' wide in right ascension. There are 35 regular survey calibration fields distributed at approximately two hour intervals in right ascension near declinations of approximately -30°, 0° and +30°. An additional five calibration fields were defined in and around the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to support the deep observation (6x) campaign towards the end of survey operations.

Over the course of the survey, the regular calibration fields were scanned between 562 and 3692 times in nominally photometric conditions. Equatorial fields were observed from both observatories, so were observed more frequently than those near ±30° which were observed with only one telescope. The special Magellanic Cloud calibration fields were observed 108 to 468 times between November 2000 and February 2001.

The following table contains brief descriptions of the entries in the Survey, 6x and Calibration Merged Point Source Information Tables. The merged source tables contain the mean positions magnitudes and uncertainties for sources detected multiple times in each of the 2MASS data sets. The merging was carried out using an autocorrelation of the respective databases to identify groups of extractions that are positionally associated with each other, all lying within a 1.5" radius circular region. A number of confirmation statistics are also provided in the tables that can be used to test for source motion and/or variability, and the general quality of the merge.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA106 Dataset

2MASS team

Photometric calibration for 2MASS was performed using observations of calibration fields made at regular intervals during each night of survey operations. Measurements of standard stars in the fields were used to derive the photometric zero point offsets as a function of time during each night. Atmospheric extinction coefficients were derived from 2MASS observations made over long periods.

2MASS calibration fields, or tiles, are 1° long in declination and approximately 8.5' wide in right ascension. There are 35 regular survey calibration fields distributed at approximately two hour intervals in right ascension near declinations of approximately -30°, 0° and +30°. An additional five calibration fields were defined in and around the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to support the deep observation (6x) campaign towards the end of survey operations.

Over the course of the survey, the regular calibration fields were scanned between 562 and 3692 times in nominally photometric conditions. Equatorial fields were observed from both observatories, so were observed more frequently than those near ±30° which were observed with only one telescope. The special Magellanic Cloud calibration fields were observed 108 to 468 times between November 2000 and February 2001.

Calibration scan Atlas Images, and Point and Extended Source Working Databases (Cal-PSWDB and Cal-XSWDB), analogous to those from the main survey, were produced from the calibration scan pipeline data reduction. The calibration Image Atlas and WDBs are the fundamental processing archives of the data from 73,230 calibration scans taken in photometric conditions during 2MASS survey operations. The Cal-WDBs contain positions, magnitudes and characteristics of 191,464,020 and 403,811 point and extended "source" extractions, respectively. The calibration Image Atlas contains 878,769 FITS images in the three survey bandpasses redundantly covering ~5 deg2 of sky. Unlike the main survey and 6x observations, "Catalogs" have not been derived from the Calibration WDBs.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA107 Dataset

2MASS team

Photometric calibration for 2MASS was performed using observations of calibration fields made at regular intervals during each night of survey operations. Measurements of standard stars in the fields were used to derive the photometric zero point offsets as a function of time during each night. Atmospheric extinction coefficients were derived from 2MASS observations made over long periods.

2MASS calibration fields, or tiles, are 1° long in declination and approximately 8.5' wide in right ascension. There are 35 regular survey calibration fields distributed at approximately two hour intervals in right ascension near declinations of approximately -30°, 0° and +30°. An additional five calibration fields were defined in and around the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to support the deep observation (6x) campaign towards the end of survey operations.

Over the course of the survey, the regular calibration fields were scanned between 562 and 3692 times in nominally photometric conditions. Equatorial fields were observed from both observatories, so were observed more frequently than those near ±30° which were observed with only one telescope. The special Magellanic Cloud calibration fields were observed 108 to 468 times between November 2000 and February 2001.

The 2MASS Calibration Scan Information Table provides basic metadata for each survey mode scan taken during 2MASS operations.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA108 Dataset

2MASS team

During the final months of 2MASS observatory operations, a campaign of targeted "long exposure" observations was carried out during times when no previously unscanned parts of the sky were available for the main survey. These observations used the same freeze-frame scanning technique employed for the survey, but with READ2-READ1 exposures six times longer than was used for normal survey observations (hence they are referred to as "6x" observations). The 2MASS 6x measurements were intended to probe ~1 magnitude deeper than the main survey in unconfused regions.

Approximately 590 deg2 of sky distributed in 30 targeted regions were scanned at least once using the long exposures. Most of this area is concentrated in two large, comprehensive surveys of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, 383 deg2 and 127 deg2, respectively. Twenty-eight additional smaller fields were mapped in the 6x mode from both observatories, covering targets that include the Pleiades open cluster, galactic star formation complexes, M31, nearby galaxy clusters and the Lockman Hole.

The 6X Scan Information Table provides basic metadata for each survey mode scan taken during 2MASS 6x observations.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA109 Dataset

2MASS team

Photometric calibration for 2MASS was performed using observations of calibration fields made at regular intervals during each night of survey operations. Measurements of standard stars in the fields were used to derive the photometric zero point offsets as a function of time during each night. Atmospheric extinction coefficients were derived from 2MASS observations made over long periods.

2MASS calibration fields, or tiles, are 1° long in declination and approximately 8.5' wide in right ascension. There are 35 regular survey calibration fields distributed at approximately two hour intervals in right ascension near declinations of approximately -30°, 0° and +30°. An additional five calibration fields were defined in and around the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to support the deep observation (6x) campaign towards the end of survey operations.

Over the course of the survey, the regular calibration fields were scanned between 562 and 3692 times in nominally photometric conditions. Equatorial fields were observed from both observatories, so were observed more frequently than those near ±30° which were observed with only one telescope. The special Magellanic Cloud calibration fields were observed 108 to 468 times between November 2000 and February 2001.

The following table contains brief descriptions of the entries in the Survey, 6x and Calibration Merged Point Source Information Tables. The merged source tables contain the mean positions magnitudes and uncertainties for sources detected multiple times in each of the 2MASS data sets. The merging was carried out using an autocorrelation of the respective databases to identify groups of extractions that are positionally associated with each other, all lying within a 1.5" radius circular region. A number of confirmation statistics are also provided in the tables that can be used to test for source motion and/or variability, and the general quality of the merge.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA110 Dataset

2MASS team

The merged source tables contain the mean positions magnitudes and uncertainties for sources detected multiple times in each of the 2MASS data sets. The merging was carried out using an autocorrelation of the respective databases to identify groups of extractions that are positionally associated with each other, all lying within a 1.5" radius circular region. A number of confirmation statistics are also provided in the tables that can be used to test for source motion and/or variability, and the general quality of the merge.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA111 Dataset

2MASS team

The 2MASS Scan Information Table provides basic data for each scan in the 2MASS All Sky Release. The table is organized according to the broad function and utility of the parameters: positional information, photometric information, source detection statistics, etc.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA112 Dataset

2MASS team

Photometric calibration for 2MASS was performed using observations of calibration fields made at regular intervals during each night of survey operations. Measurements of standard stars in the fields were used to derive the photometric zero point offsets as a function of time during each night. Atmospheric extinction coefficients were derived from 2MASS observations made over long periods.

2MASS calibration fields, or tiles, are 1° long in declination and approximately 8.5' wide in right ascension. There are 35 regular survey calibration fields distributed at approximately two hour intervals in right ascension near declinations of approximately -30°, 0° and +30°. An additional five calibration fields were defined in and around the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to support the deep observation (6x) campaign towards the end of survey operations.

Over the course of the survey, the regular calibration fields were scanned between 562 and 3692 times in nominally photometric conditions. Equatorial fields were observed from both observatories, so were observed more frequently than those near ±30° which were observed with only one telescope. The special Magellanic Cloud calibration fields were observed 108 to 468 times between November 2000 and February 2001.

The following table contains brief descriptions of the entries in the Survey, 6x and Calibration Merged Point Source Information Tables. The merged source tables contain the mean positions magnitudes and uncertainties for sources detected multiple times in each of the 2MASS data sets. The merging was carried out using an autocorrelation of the respective databases to identify groups of extractions that are positionally associated with each other, all lying within a 1.5" radius circular region. A number of confirmation statistics are also provided in the tables that can be used to test for source motion and/or variability, and the general quality of the merge.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA113 Dataset

2MASS team

During the final months of 2MASS observatory operations, a campaign of targeted "long exposure" observations was carried out during times when no previously unscanned parts of the sky were available for the main survey. These observations used the same freeze-frame scanning technique employed for the survey, but with READ2-READ1 exposures six times longer than was used for normal survey observations (hence they are referred to as "6x" observations). The 2MASS 6x measurements were intended to probe ~1 magnitude deeper than the main survey in unconfused regions.

Approximately 590 deg2 of sky distributed in 30 targeted regions were scanned at least once using the long exposures. Most of this area is concentrated in two large, comprehensive surveys of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, 383 deg2 and 127 deg2, respectively. Twenty-eight additional smaller fields were mapped in the 6x mode from both observatories, covering targets that include the Pleiades open cluster, galactic star formation complexes, M31, nearby galaxy clusters and the Lockman Hole.

The merged source tables contain the mean positions magnitudes and uncertainties for sources detected multiple times in each of the 2MASS data sets. The merging was carried out using an autocorrelation of the respective databases to identify groups of extractions that are positionally associated with each other, all lying within a 1.5" radius circular region. A number of confirmation statistics are also provided in the tables that can be used to test for source motion and/or variability, and the general quality of the merge.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA114 Dataset

2MASS team

Photometric calibration for 2MASS was performed using observations of calibration fields made at regular intervals during each night of survey operations. Measurements of standard stars in the fields were used to derive the photometric zero point offsets as a function of time during each night. Atmospheric extinction coefficients were derived from 2MASS observations made over long periods.

2MASS calibration fields, or tiles, are 1° long in declination and approximately 8.5' wide in right ascension. There are 35 regular survey calibration fields distributed at approximately two hour intervals in right ascension near declinations of approximately -30°, 0° and +30°. An additional five calibration fields were defined in and around the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to support the deep observation (6x) campaign towards the end of survey operations.

Over the course of the survey, the regular calibration fields were scanned between 562 and 3692 times in nominally photometric conditions. Equatorial fields were observed from both observatories, so were observed more frequently than those near ±30° which were observed with only one telescope. The special Magellanic Cloud calibration fields were observed 108 to 468 times between November 2000 and February 2001.

The 2MASS Calibration Scan Information Table provides basic metadata for each survey mode scan taken during 2MASS operations.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA115 Dataset

2MASS team

Photometric calibration for 2MASS was performed using observations of calibration fields made at regular intervals during each night of survey operations. Measurements of standard stars in the fields were used to derive the photometric zero point offsets as a function of time during each night. Atmospheric extinction coefficients were derived from 2MASS observations made over long periods.

2MASS calibration fields, or tiles, are 1° long in declination and approximately 8.5' wide in right ascension. There are 35 regular survey calibration fields distributed at approximately two hour intervals in right ascension near declinations of approximately -30°, 0° and +30°. An additional five calibration fields were defined in and around the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to support the deep observation (6x) campaign towards the end of survey operations.

Over the course of the survey, the regular calibration fields were scanned between 562 and 3692 times in nominally photometric conditions. Equatorial fields were observed from both observatories, so were observed more frequently than those near ±30° which were observed with only one telescope. The special Magellanic Cloud calibration fields were observed 108 to 468 times between November 2000 and February 2001.

Calibration scan Atlas Images, and Point and Extended Source Working Databases (Cal-PSWDB and Cal-XSWDB), analogous to those from the main survey, were produced from the calibration scan pipeline data reduction. The calibration Image Atlas and WDBs are the fundamental processing archives of the data from 73,230 calibration scans taken in photometric conditions during 2MASS survey operations. The Cal-WDBs contain positions, magnitudes and characteristics of 191,464,020 and 403,811 point and extended "source" extractions, respectively. The calibration Image Atlas contains 878,769 FITS images in the three survey bandpasses redundantly covering ~5 deg2 of sky. Unlike the main survey and 6x observations, "Catalogs" have not been derived from the Calibration WDBs.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA116 Dataset

2MASS team

Photometric calibration for 2MASS was performed using observations of calibration fields made at regular intervals during each night of survey operations. Measurements of standard stars in the fields were used to derive the photometric zero point offsets as a function of time during each night. Atmospheric extinction coefficients were derived from 2MASS observations made over long periods.

2MASS calibration fields, or tiles, are 1° long in declination and approximately 8.5' wide in right ascension. There are 35 regular survey calibration fields distributed at approximately two hour intervals in right ascension near declinations of approximately -30°, 0° and +30°. An additional five calibration fields were defined in and around the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to support the deep observation (6x) campaign towards the end of survey operations.

Over the course of the survey, the regular calibration fields were scanned between 562 and 3692 times in nominally photometric conditions. Equatorial fields were observed from both observatories, so were observed more frequently than those near ±30° which were observed with only one telescope. The special Magellanic Cloud calibration fields were observed 108 to 468 times between November 2000 and February 2001.

Calibration scan Atlas Images, and Point and Extended Source Working Databases (Cal-PSWDB and Cal-XSWDB), analogous to those from the main survey, were produced from the calibration scan pipeline data reduction. The calibration Image Atlas and WDBs are the fundamental processing archives of the data from 73,230 calibration scans taken in photometric conditions during 2MASS survey operations. The Cal-WDBs contain positions, magnitudes and characteristics of 191,464,020 and 403,811 point and extended "source" extractions, respectively. The calibration Image Atlas contains 878,769 FITS images in the three survey bandpasses redundantly covering ~5 deg2 of sky. Unlike the main survey and 6x observations, "Catalogs" have not been derived from the Calibration WDBs.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA117 Dataset

2MASS team

The 2MASS Survey Point and Extended Source "Reject" Tables (PSRT and XSRT) contain the 843,988,897 point and 943,441 extended source measurements from the Survey WDBs that were not selected for inclusion in the All-Sky Release Catalogs. The characteristics of entries in the Reject Tables differs between scans that were and were not selected for inclusion in the All-Sky Release:

In the 10,981 survey scans that were not selected for the All-Sky Release, the Reject Tables contain all point and extended source extractions. These include reliable detections of real astrophysical sources, spurious extractions of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) events, image artifacts and transients such as cosmic rays and meteor trails.

In the 59,731 survey scans that were selected for the All-Sky Release, the Reject Tables contain only those extractions from the Survey WDBs that did not satisfy the source selection criteria used to construct the uniform and reliable All-Sky Release Catalogs. These include detections of faint sources and noise events that are below the Catalog flux and SNR thresholds, and spurious detections of image artifacts and transients. The Reject Tables also contain detections of brighter sources in the overlap regions between adjacent tiles that were removed during the Catalog multiple detection resolution process.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA118 Dataset

2MASS team

Photometric calibration for 2MASS was performed using observations of calibration fields made at regular intervals during each night of survey operations. Measurements of standard stars in the fields were used to derive the photometric zero point offsets as a function of time during each night. Atmospheric extinction coefficients were derived from 2MASS observations made over long periods.

2MASS calibration fields, or tiles, are 1° long in declination and approximately 8.5' wide in right ascension. There are 35 regular survey calibration fields distributed at approximately two hour intervals in right ascension near declinations of approximately -30°, 0° and +30°. An additional five calibration fields were defined in and around the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to support the deep observation (6x) campaign towards the end of survey operations.

Over the course of the survey, the regular calibration fields were scanned between 562 and 3692 times in nominally photometric conditions. Equatorial fields were observed from both observatories, so were observed more frequently than those near ±30° which were observed with only one telescope. The special Magellanic Cloud calibration fields were observed 108 to 468 times between November 2000 and February 2001.

Calibration scan Atlas Images, and Point and Extended Source Working Databases (Cal-PSWDB and Cal-XSWDB), analogous to those from the main survey, were produced from the calibration scan pipeline data reduction. The calibration Image Atlas and WDBs are the fundamental processing archives of the data from 73,230 calibration scans taken in photometric conditions during 2MASS survey operations. The Cal-WDBs contain positions, magnitudes and characteristics of 191,464,020 and 403,811 point and extended "source" extractions, respectively. The calibration Image Atlas contains 878,769 FITS images in the three survey bandpasses redundantly covering ~5 deg2 of sky. Unlike the main survey and 6x observations, "Catalogs" have not been derived from the Calibration WDBs.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA119 Dataset

2MASS team

During the final months of 2MASS observatory operations, a campaign of targeted "long exposure" observations was carried out during times when no previously unscanned parts of the sky were available for the main survey. These observations used the same freeze-frame scanning technique employed for the survey, but with READ2-READ1 exposures six times longer than was used for normal survey observations (hence they are referred to as "6x" observations). The 2MASS 6x measurements were intended to probe ~1 magnitude deeper than the main survey in unconfused regions.

Approximately 590 deg2 of sky distributed in 30 targeted regions were scanned at least once using the long exposures. Most of this area is concentrated in two large, comprehensive surveys of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, 383 deg2 and 127 deg2, respectively. Twenty-eight additional smaller fields were mapped in the 6x mode from both observatories, covering targets that include the Pleiades open cluster, galactic star formation complexes, M31, nearby galaxy clusters and the Lockman Hole.

The merged source tables contain the mean positions magnitudes and uncertainties for sources detected multiple times in each of the 2MASS data sets. The merging was carried out using an autocorrelation of the respective databases to identify groups of extractions that are positionally associated with each other, all lying within a 1.5" radius circular region. A number of confirmation statistics are also provided in the tables that can be used to test for source motion and/or variability, and the general quality of the merge.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA120 Dataset

These Lockman Hole (LH) data represent a preliminary analysis of the deep 2MASS observations of this region, and are not a product endorsed by the 2MASS project. These data are described in The Astronomical Journal, Volume 125, Issue 5, pp. 2521-2530 "A Deep 2MASS survey of the Lockman Hole" by Beichman et al.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA121 Dataset

This service provides access to and information about the 2MASS All-Sky Atlas Images. Atlas Images delivered by this service are in FITS format and contain full WCS information in their headers. Additionally, the image headers contain photometric zero point information. 2MASS Atlas Images are suitable for quantitative photometric measurements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA122 Dataset

T.H. Jarrett, T. Chester, R. Cutri (IPAC/Caltech); S. Schneider (UMASS); J.P. Huchra (Harvard/CfA)

The high sensitivity and angular resolution of the 2MASS Large Galaxy Atlas (LGA) images allows closer inspection of diverse stellar populations, large-scale structures such as spirals, bulges, warps and bars, star formation regions and evolution of galaxies. This image atlas represents the first uniform, all-sky, view of galaxies as seen in the near-infrared wavelength window that is most sensitive to the dominant mass component of galaxies.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA123 Dataset

This service provides access to and information about the 2MASS All-Sky Quicklook Images. The Quicklook Images delivered by this service are restored from lossy-compressed files in FITS format with full WCS information contained in the image headers. These images are suitable for position measurements, finding charts and visual inspection of the near-infrared sky.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA124 Dataset

WISE Team

The NEOWISE Post-Cryo Single-exposure Source Database contains 7,337,642,955 measurements of positions and brightness information, uncertainties, time of observation and assorted quality flags made on the individual WISE 7.7s (W1 and W2) Single-exposure images. Because WISE scanned every point on the sky multiple times, the Single-exposure Database contains multiple, independent measurements of objects on the sky.

Entries in the Single-exposure Source Database include detections of real astrophysical objects, as well as spurious detections of low SNR noise excursions, transient events such as hot pixels, charged particle strikes and satellite streaks, and image artifacts light from bright sources including the moon. Many of the unreliable detections are flagged in the Single-exposure Database, but they have not been filtered out as they were for the All-Sky Release Source Catalog. Therefore, the Database must be used with caution. Users are strongly encouraged to read the Cautionary Notes before using the Database.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA125 Dataset

WISE Team

The NEOWISE Post-Cryo Data Release products were generated using data taken during the mission's Post-Cryo survey phase. This phase covers the time following the exhaustion of solid hydrogen in the WISE payload inner cryogen tank, when the detectors and optics gradually warmed until they reached a stable equilibrium temperature near 73.5 K. During this time, WISE's W1 and W2 detectors continued to acquire high quality imaging data with sensitivities close to that during the mission's cryogenic survey phases. The W3 and W4 detectors were fully saturated by the thermal emission from the warming telescope. WISE scanned approximately 70% of the sky during the Post-Cryo survey phase continuing with the same strategy that was used during the full cryogenic survey.

The Known Solar System Object Possible Associations List is a compendium of asteroids and comets, with orbits known at the time of WISE second-pass data processing, that were predicted to be within the field-of-view at the time of individual WISE exposures. Individual objects were observed multiple times, so may have multiple entries in the list. When the predicted position of a solar system object is in proximity to a detection in the WISE single-exposures, the WISE source position and brightness information are also provided.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA126 Dataset

CatWISE team

The CatWISE Preliminary catalog contains positions and brightnesses for 900,849,014 sources selected from combined WISE and NEOWISE all-sky survey data collected from 2010 to 2016 at 3.4 and 4.6 microns (W1 and W2). CatWISE adapts AllWISE software to measure the sources in co-added images created from six month subsets of these data, each representing one coverage of the inertial sky, or epoch. The catalog includes the measured motion of sources in 8 epochs over the 6 year span of the data.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA127 Dataset

WISE Team

The WISE 3-Band Cryo Single Exposure (L1b) Source Table contains positions and photometry in the 3.4, 4.6 and 12 μm bands for 3,703,319,374 sources extracted from observations made during the WISE 3-Band Cryo survey phase, 6 August 2010 through 29 September 2010. WISE scanned approximately 30% of the sky during this period when the telescope and focal planes operated at a slightly higher temperature, but were still cooled by solid hydrogen in the inner cryogen tank.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA128 Dataset

WISE Team

The WISE 3-Band Cryo Data Release products are comprised of data taken during the mission's 3-Band Cryo survey phase. This phase covers the time following the exhaustion of solid hydrogen in the WISE payload outer cryogen tank, while the detectors and telescope were still cooled by the inner cryogen tank. During this time, WISE's W1, W2 and W3 bands were operational and continued to acquire useful data, but the W4 detector was saturated by thermal emission from the warming telescope. The sensitivity achieved in the W1 and W2 bands was similar to that during the full cryogenic mission phase. The W3 measurement sensitivity was degraded and decreased steadily during the 3-Band Cryo phase because of the increasing telescope temperature and decreasing exposure times. WISE scanned approximately 30% of the sky during the 3-Band Cryo survey phase continuing with the same strategy that was used during the full cryogenic survey.

The following table contains brief descriptions of all metadata information that is relevant to the processing of Single-exposure (level 1) images and the extraction of sources from the corresponding Single-exposure images. The table contains the unique scan ID for a specific scan frame and the reconstructed right ascension and declination of the level 1b frame center. Much of the information in this table is processing-specific, and may not be of interest to general users (e.g. flags indicating whether frames have been processed or not, and the date and time for starting of the pipeline, etc.). The metadata table also contains some characterization and derived statistics of the Single-expsoure image frames, basic photometric parameters used for photometry and derived statistics for extracted sources and artifacts. For example, it contains median pixel values of the coadded sky coverage map, the number of sources with profile-fit photometry Signal-to-Noise (SNR) greater than 3, and the total number of real sources affected by artifacts such as electronic ghosts, etc.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA129 Dataset

WISE Team

The WISE 3-Band Cryo Source Working Database (WDB) contains positions and photometry in the 3.4, 4.6 and 12 μm bands for 261,418,479 sources extracted from observations made during the WISE 3-Band Cryo survey phase, 6 August 2010 through 29 September 2010. WISE scanned approximately 30% of the sky during this period when the telescope and focal planes operated at a slightly higher temperature, but were still cooled by solid hydrogen in the inner cryogen tank.

CAUTION: The 3-Band Cryo Source WDB is not a well-vetted, reliable list of infrared sources like the WISE All-Sky Release Source Catalog. The WDB contains both detections of real astronomical objects, as well as spurious detections of image artifacts, noise excursions, transient events such as cosmic rays, satellite trails and hot pixels. The WDB also contains redundant extractions of objects that fall in the overlap region between the 3-Band Cryo Atlas Tiles.

The WISE 3-Band Cryo Source WDB is best used as a resource to learn more about objects that are found in the All-Sky Release Source Catalog. The 3-Band Cryo observations offer a second, independent epoch of measurement for objects in 30% of the sky, so can be used to test for object motion, flux variability and reliability in the case of very faint sources. 3-Band Cryo WDB entries have been cross-correlated with the All-Sky Catalog and associated Catalog source information is provided in the 3-Band Cryo WDB records.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA130 Dataset

WISE Team

The WISE 3-Band Cryo Single Exposure (L1b) Source Table contains positions and photometry in the 3.4, 4.6 and 12 μm bands for 3,703,319,374 sources extracted from observations made during the WISE 3-Band Cryo survey phase, 6 August 2010 through 29 September 2010. WISE scanned approximately 30% of the sky during this period when the telescope and focal planes operated at a slightly higher temperature, but were still cooled by solid hydrogen in the inner cryogen tank.

The Known Solar System Object Possible Associations List is a compendium of asteroids and comets, with orbits known at the time of WISE second-pass data processing, that were predicted to be within the field-of-view at the time of individual WISE exposures. Individual objects were observed multiple times, so may have multiple entries in the list. When the predicted position of a solar system object is in proximity to a detection in the WISE single-exposures, the WISE source position and brightness information are also provided.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA131 Dataset

WISE Team

The WISE 3-Band Cryo Data Release products are comprised of data taken during the mission's 3-Band Cryo survey phase. This phase covers the time following the exhaustion of solid hydrogen in the WISE payload outer cryogen tank, while the detectors and telescope were still cooled by the inner cryogen tank. During this time, WISE's W1, W2 and W3 bands were operational and continued to acquire useful data, but the W4 detector was saturated by thermal emission from the warming telescope. The sensitivity achieved in the W1 and W2 bands was similar to that during the full cryogenic mission phase. The W3 measurement sensitivity was degraded and decreased steadily during the 3-Band Cryo phase because of the increasing telescope temperature and decreasing exposure times. WISE scanned approximately 30% of the sky during the 3-Band Cryo survey phase continuing with the same strategy that was used during the full cryogenic survey.

The following table contains brief descriptions of all metadata information that is relevant to the production of the Atlas images and Source Catalog. The table contains the (RA, DEC) of the center of the Tile. Much of the information in this table is processing-specific and may not be of interest to general users (e.g., flags indicating whether frames have been processed successfully or not, and the date and time of the start of the pipeline processing, etc.). The metadata table also contains some characterization and derived statistics of the coadd image Tile, basic photometric parameters used for photometry and derived statistics for extracted sources and artifacts. For example, it contains median pixel values of the coadded sky coverage map, the number of sources with profile-fit photometry Signal-to-Noise (SNR) greater than 3, and the total number of real sources affected by artifacts such as optical ghosts, etc.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA132 Dataset

WISE

The WISE Preliminary Release includes data from the first 105 days of WISE survey observations, 14 January 2010 to 29 April 2010, that were processed with initial calibrations and reduction algorithms. Primary release data products include an Atlas of 10,464 calibrated, coadded Image Sets, a Source Catalog containing positional and photometric information for over 257 million objects detected on the WISE images, and an Explanatory Supplement that provides a user's guide to the WISE mission and format, content, characteristics and cautionary notes for the Release products. Ancillary release products include an archive of over 754,000 Single-exposure Image sets and database of over 2.2 billion source extractions from those images, and moving object tracklets identified as part of the NEOWISE program (Mainzer et al. 2011).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA133 Dataset

CatWISE team

The CatWISE Preliminary catalog contains positions and brightnesses for 900,849,014 sources selected from combined WISE and NEOWISE all-sky survey data collected from 2010 to 2016 at 3.4 and 4.6 microns (W1 and W2). CatWISE adapts AllWISE software to measure the sources in co-added images created from six month subsets of these data, each representing one coverage of the inertial sky, or epoch. The catalog includes the measured motion of sources in 8 epochs over the 6 year span of the data.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA134 Dataset

WISE Team

The AllWISE program builds upon the work of the successful Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) by combining data from the WISE cryogenic and NEOWISE (Mainzer et al. 2011 ApJ, 731, 53) post-cryogenic survey phases to form the most comprehensive view of the full mid-infrared sky currently available. By combining the data from two complete sky coverage epochs using an advanced data processing system, AllWISE has generated new products that have enhanced photometric sensitivity and accuracy, and improved astrometric precision compared to the 2012 WISE All-Sky Data Release. Exploiting the 6 to 12 month baseline between the WISE sky coverage epochs enables AllWISE to measure source motions for the first time, and to compute improved flux variability statistics.

The AllWISE Multiepoch Photometry (MEP) Database is a compendium of time-tagged fluxes measured on the individual Single-exposure image sets forced at the position of each deep source extraction that is in the AllWISE Source Catalog and Reject Table.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA135 Dataset

WISE Team

The AllWISE program builds upon the work of the successful Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) by combining data from the WISE cryogenic and NEOWISE (Mainzer et al. 2011 ApJ, 731, 53) post-cryogenic survey phases to form the most comprehensive view of the full mid-infrared sky currently available. By combining the data from two complete sky coverage epochs using an advanced data processing system, AllWISE has generated new products that have enhanced photometric sensitivity and accuracy, and improved astrometric precision compared to the 2012 WISE All-Sky Data Release. Exploiting the 6 to 12 month baseline between the WISE sky coverage epochs enables AllWISE to measure source motions for the first time, and to compute improved flux variability statistics.

The AllWISE Atlas Metadata Table contains brief descriptions of all metadata information that is relevant to the production of the Atlas images and Source Catalog. The table contains the (RA, DEC) of the center of the Tile. Much of the information in this table is processing-specific and may not be of interest to general users (e.g., flags indicating whether frames have been processed successfully or not, and the date and time of the start of the pipeline processing, etc.). The metadata table also contains some characterization and derived statistics of the coadd image Tile, basic photometric parameters used for photometry and derived statistics for extracted sources and artifacts.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA136 Dataset

WISE Team

The AllWISE program builds upon the work of the successful Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) by combining data from the WISE cryogenic and NEOWISE (Mainzer et al. 2011 ApJ, 731, 53) post-cryogenic survey phases to form the most comprehensive view of the full mid-infrared sky currently available. By combining the data from two complete sky coverage epochs using an advanced data processing system, AllWISE has generated new products that have enhanced photometric sensitivity and accuracy, and improved astrometric precision compared to the 2012 WISE All-Sky Data Release. Exploiting the 6 to 12 month baseline between the WISE sky coverage epochs enables AllWISE to measure source motions for the first time, and to compute improved flux variability statistics.

The AllWISE Reject Table contains the source extractions that do not meet the uniqueness and/or reliability criteria required for inclusion in the Source Catalog.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA137 Dataset

WISE Team

NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) mapped the sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm (W1, W2, W3, W4) in 2010 with an angular resolution of 6.1", 6.4", 6.5", & 12.0" in the four bands. WISE achieved 5σ point source sensitivities better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in the four bands. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodiacal background.

The All-Sky Release includes all data taken during the WISE full cryogenic mission phase, 7 January 2010 to 6 August 2010, that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms. Release data products include an Atlas of 18,240 match-filtered, calibrated and coadded image sets, a Source Catalog containing positional and photometric information for over 563 million objects detected on the WISE images, and an Explanatory Supplement that is a guide to the format, content, characteristics and cautionary notes for the WISE All-Sky Release products.

The Known Solar System Object Possible Associations List is a compendium of asteroids, comets, planets or planetary satellites, with orbits known at the time of WISE second-pass data processing, that were predicted to be within the field-of-view at the time of individual WISE exposures. Individual objects were observed multiple times, so may have multiple entries in the list. When the predicted position of a solar system object is in proximity to a detection in the WISE single-exposures, the WISE source position and brightness information are also provided.

The WISE All-Sky Data Release Single-exposure Source Working Database contains positions and brightness information, uncertainties, time of observation and assorted quality flags for 9,479,433,101 "sources" detected on the individual WISE 7.7s (W1 and W2) and 8.8s (W3 and W4) Single-exposure images. Because WISE scanned every point on the sky multiple times, the Single-exposure Database contains multiple, independent measurements of objects on the sky.

Entries in the Single-exposure Source Table include detections of real astrophysical objects, as well as spurious detections of low SNR noise excursions, transient events such as hot pixels, charged particle strikes and satellite streaks, and image artifacts light from bright sources including the moon. Many of the unreliable detections are flagged in the Single-exposure Table, but they have not been filtered out as they were for the Source Catalog. Therefore, the Table must be used with caution. Users are strongly encouraged to read the Cautionary Notes before using the Table.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA138 Dataset

WISE Team

NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) mapped the sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm (W1, W2, W3, W4) in 2010 with an angular resolution of 6.1", 6.4", 6.5", & 12.0" in the four bands. WISE achieved 5σ point source sensitivities better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in the four bands. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodiacal background.

The All-Sky Release includes all data taken during the WISE full cryogenic mission phase, 7 January 2010 to 6 August 2010, that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms. Release data products include an Atlas of 18,240 match-filtered, calibrated and coadded image sets, a Source Catalog containing positional and photometric information for over 563 million objects detected on the WISE images, and an Explanatory Supplement that is a guide to the format, content, characteristics and cautionary notes for the WISE All-Sky Release products.

The WISE All-Sky Data Release Single-exposure Source Working Database contains positions and brightness information, uncertainties, time of observation and assorted quality flags for 9,479,433,101 "sources" detected on the individual WISE 7.7s (W1 and W2) and 8.8s (W3 and W4) Single-exposure images. Because WISE scanned every point on the sky multiple times, the Single-exposure Database contains multiple, independent measurements of objects on the sky.

Entries in the Single-exposure Source Table include detections of real astrophysical objects, as well as spurious detections of low SNR noise excursions, transient events such as hot pixels, charged particle strikes and satellite streaks, and image artifacts light from bright sources including the moon. Many of the unreliable detections are flagged in the Single-exposure Table, but they have not been filtered out as they were for the Source Catalog. Therefore, the Table must be used with caution. Users are strongly encouraged to read the Cautionary Notes before using the Table.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA139 Dataset

WISE Team

NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) mapped the sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm (W1, W2, W3, W4) in 2010 with an angular resolution of 6.1", 6.4", 6.5", & 12.0" in the four bands. WISE achieved 5σ point source sensitivities better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in the four bands. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodiacal background.

The All-Sky Release includes all data taken during the WISE full cryogenic mission phase, 7 January 2010 to 6 August 2010, that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms. Release data products include an Atlas of 18,240 match-filtered, calibrated and coadded image sets, a Source Catalog containing positional and photometric information for over 563 million objects detected on the WISE images, and an Explanatory Supplement that is a guide to the format, content, characteristics and cautionary notes for the WISE All-Sky Release products.

The WISE All-Sky Data Release Single-exposure Source Working Database contains positions and brightness information, uncertainties, time of observation and assorted quality flags for 9,479,433,101 "sources" detected on the individual WISE 7.7s (W1 and W2) and 8.8s (W3 and W4) Single-exposure images. Because WISE scanned every point on the sky multiple times, the Single-exposure Database contains multiple, independent measurements of objects on the sky.

Entries in the Single-exposure Source Table include detections of real astrophysical objects, as well as spurious detections of low SNR noise excursions, transient events such as hot pixels, charged particle strikes and satellite streaks, and image artifacts light from bright sources including the moon. Many of the unreliable detections are flagged in the Single-exposure Table, but they have not been filtered out as they were for the Source Catalog. Therefore, the Table must be used with caution. Users are strongly encouraged to read the Cautionary Notes before using the Table.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA140 Dataset

WISE Team

NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) mapped the sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm (W1, W2, W3, W4) in 2010 with an angular resolution of 6.1", 6.4", 6.5", & 12.0" in the four bands. WISE achieved 5σ point source sensitivities better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in the four bands. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodiacal background.

The All-Sky Release includes all data taken during the WISE full cryogenic mission phase, 7 January 2010 to 6 August 2010, that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms. Release data products include an Atlas of 18,240 match-filtered, calibrated and coadded image sets, a Source Catalog containing positional and photometric information for over 563 million objects detected on the WISE images, and an Explanatory Supplement that is a guide to the format, content, characteristics and cautionary notes for the WISE All-Sky Release products.

The WISE All-Sky Data Release Single-exposure Source Working Database contains positions and brightness information, uncertainties, time of observation and assorted quality flags for 9,479,433,101 "sources" detected on the individual WISE 7.7s (W1 and W2) and 8.8s (W3 and W4) Single-exposure images. Because WISE scanned every point on the sky multiple times, the Single-exposure Database contains multiple, independent measurements of objects on the sky.

Entries in the Single-exposure Source Table include detections of real astrophysical objects, as well as spurious detections of low SNR noise excursions, transient events such as hot pixels, charged particle strikes and satellite streaks, and image artifacts light from bright sources including the moon. Many of the unreliable detections are flagged in the Single-exposure Table, but they have not been filtered out as they were for the Source Catalog. Therefore, the Table must be used with caution. Users are strongly encouraged to read the Cautionary Notes before using the Table.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA141 Dataset

WISE Team

NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) mapped the sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm (W1, W2, W3, W4) in 2010 with an angular resolution of 6.1", 6.4", 6.5", & 12.0" in the four bands. WISE achieved 5σ point source sensitivities better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in the four bands. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodiacal background.

The All-Sky Release includes all data taken during the WISE full cryogenic mission phase, 7 January 2010 to 6 August 2010, that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms. Release data products include an Atlas of 18,240 match-filtered, calibrated and coadded image sets, a Source Catalog containing positional and photometric information for over 563 million objects detected on the WISE images, and an Explanatory Supplement that is a guide to the format, content, characteristics and cautionary notes for the WISE All-Sky Release products.

The WISE All-Sky Data Release Single-exposure Source Working Database contains positions and brightness information, uncertainties, time of observation and assorted quality flags for 9,479,433,101 "sources" detected on the individual WISE 7.7s (W1 and W2) and 8.8s (W3 and W4) Single-exposure images. Because WISE scanned every point on the sky multiple times, the Single-exposure Database contains multiple, independent measurements of objects on the sky.

Entries in the Single-exposure Source Table include detections of real astrophysical objects, as well as spurious detections of low SNR noise excursions, transient events such as hot pixels, charged particle strikes and satellite streaks, and image artifacts light from bright sources including the moon. Many of the unreliable detections are flagged in the Single-exposure Table, but they have not been filtered out as they were for the Source Catalog. Therefore, the Table must be used with caution. Users are strongly encouraged to read the Cautionary Notes before using the Table.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA142 Dataset

WISE Team

NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) mapped the sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm (W1, W2, W3, W4) in 2010 with an angular resolution of 6.1", 6.4", 6.5", & 12.0" in the four bands. WISE achieved 5σ point source sensitivities better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in the four bands. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodiacal background.

The All-Sky Release includes all data taken during the WISE full cryogenic mission phase, 7 January 2010 to 6 August 2010, that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms. Release data products include an Atlas of 18,240 match-filtered, calibrated and coadded image sets, a Source Catalog containing positional and photometric information for over 563 million objects detected on the WISE images, and an Explanatory Supplement that is a guide to the format, content, characteristics and cautionary notes for the WISE All-Sky Release products.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA143 Dataset

NEOWISE Team

The Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer Reactivation Mission (NEOWISE; Mainzer et al. 2014, ApJ, 792, 30) is a NASA Planetary Science Division space-based survey to detect, track and characterize asteroids and comets, and to learn more about the population of near-Earth objects that could pose an impact hazard to the Earth. NEOWISE systematically images the sky at 3.4 and 4.6 μm, obtaining multiple independent observations on each location that enable detection of previously known and new solar system small bodies by virtue of the their motion. Because it is an infrared survey, NEOWISE detects asteroid thermal emission and is equally sensitive to high and low albedo objects.

The following table contains brief descriptions of all metadata information that is relevant to the processing of Single-exposure (level 1) images and the extraction of sources from the corresponding Single-exposure images. The table contains the unique scan ID and frame number for specific each single-exposure image and the reconstructed right ascension and declination of the image center. Much of the information in this table is processing-specific, and may not be of interest to general users (e.g. flags indicating whether frames have been processed or not, and the date and time for starting of the pipeline etc). The metadata table also contains some characterization and derived statistics of the Single-exposure image frames, basic parameters used for photometry and derived statistics for extracted sources and artifacts. For example, it contains the number of sources with profile-fit photometry Signal-to-Noise (SNR) greater than 3, and the total number of real sources affected by artifacts such as latent images and electronic ghosts.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA144 Dataset

NEOWISE Team

The Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer Reactivation Mission (NEOWISE; Mainzer et al. 2014, ApJ, 792, 30) is a NASA Planetary Science Division space-based survey to detect, track and characterize asteroids and comets, and to learn more about the population of near-Earth objects that could pose an impact hazard to the Earth. NEOWISE systematically images the sky at 3.4 and 4.6 μm, obtaining multiple independent observations on each location that enable detection of previously known and new solar system small bodies by virtue of the their motion. Because it is an infrared survey, NEOWISE detects asteroid thermal emission and is equally sensitive to high and low albedo objects.

The Single-exposure Source Database is a compendium of position and flux information for source detections made on the individual NEOWISE 7.7s W1 and W2 Single-exposure images. Because NEOWISE scanned the same region of the sky multiple times, the Single-exposure Database contains multiple, independent measurements of objects. Positions, magnitudes in the two NEOWISE bands, astrometric and photometric uncertainties, flags indicating measurement quality, the time of observations and associations with the AllWISE Source Catalog and 2MASS Point Source Catalog are presented for entries in the Database.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA145 Dataset

NEOWISE Team

The Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer Reactivation Mission (NEOWISE; Mainzer et al. 2014, ApJ, 792, 30) is a NASA Planetary Science Division space-based survey to detect, track and characterize asteroids and comets, and to learn more about the population of near-Earth objects that could pose an impact hazard to the Earth. NEOWISE systematically images the sky at 3.4 and 4.6 μm, obtaining multiple independent observations on each location that enable detection of previously known and new solar system small bodies by virtue of the their motion. Because it is an infrared survey, NEOWISE detects asteroid thermal emission and is equally sensitive to high and low albedo objects.

The Known Solar-System Object Possible Associations List is a compendium of asteroids, comets, planets or planetary satellites, with orbits known at the time of NEOWISE data processing, that were predicted to be within the field-of-view at the time of individual NEOWISE Single-exposures. Individual objects were observed multiple times, so may have multiple entries in the list. When the predicted position of a solar system object is in proximity to a detection in the NEOWISE Single-exposures, the NEOWISE detection position and brightness information are also provided.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA146 Dataset

Anderson et al.

The WISE Catalog of Galactic HII Regions consists of 8000 Galactic HII regions and HII region candidates selected by searching for their characteristic mid-infrared (MIR) morphology. WISE has sufficient sensitivity to detect the MIR emission from HII regions located anywhere in the Galactic disk. This is the most complete catalog yet of regions forming massive stars in the Milky Way. Of the ~8000 cataloged sources, ~1500 have measured radio recombination line (RRL) or Halpha emission, and are thus known to be HII regions. This sample improves on previous efforts by resolving HII region complexes into multiple sources and by removing duplicate entries. There are ~2500 candidate HII regions in the catalog that are spatially coincident with radio continuum emission. Previous RRL studies show that ~95% of such targets are HII regions. Approximately 500 of these candidates are also positionally associated with known HII region complexes, so the probability of their being bona fide HII regions is even higher. At the sensitivity limits of existing surveys, ~4000 catalog sources show no radio continuum emission. Distances for ~1500 catalog sources and molecular velocities for ~1500 HII region candidates are taken from the literature.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA147 Dataset

NEOWISE-R team

The Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer Reactivation Mission (NEOWISE; Mainzer et al. 2014, ApJ, 792, 30) is a NASA Planetary Science Division space-based survey to detect, track and characterize asteroids and comets, and to learn more about the population of near-Earth objects that could pose an impact hazard to the Earth. NEOWISE systematically images the sky at 3.4 and 4.6 μm, obtaining multiple independent observations on each location that enable detection of previously known and new solar system small bodies by virtue of the their motion. Because it is an infrared survey, NEOWISE detects asteroid thermal emission and is equally sensitive to high and low albedo objects.

The NEOWISE 2015 Data Release is the first annual release of Single-exposure data, and contains all observations from the first year of survey operations, 13 December 2013 to 13 December 2014 UTC. NEOWISE scanned the sky nearly two complete times during this period, accumulating 24 or more independent exposures on each point on the sky.

The 2015 NEOWISE Release data products include single-exposure Images - 2,497,867 calibrated 1016x1016 pix @2.75"/pix FITS image sets for the individual 7.7 sec W1 and W2 NEOWISE survey exposures. Each image set consists of two intensity images, noise maps, and bit-masks indicating pixel use status, one each for the W1 and W2 bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA148 Dataset

WISE team

The WISE 3-Band Cryo Data Release products are comprised of data taken during the mission's 3-Band Cryo survey phase. This phase covers the time following the exhaustion of solid hydrogen in the WISE payload outer cryogen tank, while the detectors and telescope were still cooled by the inner cryogen tank. During this time, WISE's W1, W2 and W3 bands were operational and continued to acquire useful data, but the W4 detector was saturated by thermal emission from the warming telescope. The sensitivity achieved in the W1 and W2 bands was similar to that during the full cryogenic mission phase. The W3 measurement sensitivity was degraded and decreased steadily during the 3-Band Cryo phase because of the increasing telescope temperature and decreasing exposure times.

The NEOWISE Post-Cryo Data Release products were generated using data taken during the mission's Post-Cryo survey phase. This phase covers the time following the exhaustion of solid hydrogen in the WISE payload inner cryogen tank, when the detectors and optics gradually warmed until they reached a stable equilibrium temperature near 73.5 K (VIII.1.a.i). During this time, WISE's W1 and W2 detectors continued to acquire high quality imaging data with sensitivities close to that during the mission's cryogenic survey phases. The W3 and W4 detectors were fully saturated by the thermal emission from the warming telescope.

WISE scanned approximately 70% of the sky during the Post-Cryo survey phase continuing with the same strategy that was used during the full cryogenic survey. WISE scanned along lines of constant ecliptic longitude from near one ecliptic pole to near the other pole with a scan rate close to the orbital rate of 3.8 arc-minutes/second in order to always point away from the Earth. Each semi-circular track from ecliptic pole to ecliptic pole is called a scan. During each scan WISE took a frameset every 11 seconds. Each Post-Cryo frameset contains two images, one for each of the W1 and W2 bands, both observing the same 47x47 arc-minute square patch of sky.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA149 Dataset

WISE team

The WISE 3-Band Cryo Data Release products are comprised of data taken during the mission's 3-Band Cryo survey phase. This phase covers the time following the exhaustion of solid hydrogen in the WISE payload outer cryogen tank, while the detectors and telescope were still cooled by the inner cryogen tank. During this time, WISE's W1, W2 and W3 bands were operational and continued to acquire useful data, but the W4 detector was saturated by thermal emission from the warming telescope. The sensitivity achieved in the W1 and W2 bands was similar to that during the full cryogenic mission phase. The W3 measurement sensitivity was degraded and decreased steadily during the 3-Band Cryo phase because of the increasing telescope temperature and decreasing exposure times.

The WISE 3-Band Cryo Release Single-Exposure images consist of 392,879 photometrically and astrometrically calibrated 1016x1016 pix at 2.75"/pix FITS image sets for each individual WISE exposure taken between 6 August and 29 September 2010. Each image set consists of intensity images, noise maps, and bit-masks indicating pixel use status, one each for the W1, W2, and W3 bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA150 Dataset

WISE team

The WISE 3-Band Cryo Data Release products are comprised of data taken during the mission's 3-Band Cryo survey phase. This phase covers the time following the exhaustion of solid hydrogen in the WISE payload outer cryogen tank, while the detectors and telescope were still cooled by the inner cryogen tank. During this time, WISE's W1, W2 and W3 bands were operational and continued to acquire useful data, but the W4 detector was saturated by thermal emission from the warming telescope. The sensitivity achieved in the W1 and W2 bands was similar to that during the full cryogenic mission phase. The W3 measurement sensitivity was degraded and decreased steadily during the 3-Band Cryo phase because of the increasing telescope temperature and decreasing exposure times.

The WISE 3-Band Cryo Image Atlas is comprised of 5,649 4095x4095 pix at 1.375"/pix FITS format image sets. Each image set consists of intensity images, coverage maps, and uncertainty maps, one each for the W1, W2, and W3 bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA151 Dataset

NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive

NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm (W1, W2, W3, W4) with an angular resolution of 6.1", 6.4", 6.5", & 12.0" in the four bands. The WISE All-Sky Image Atlas is comprised of 18,240 4095x4095 pix at 1.375"/pix 18,240 match-filtered, calibrated and coadded FITS format image sets.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA152 Dataset

NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive

NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm (W1, W2, W3, W4) with an angular resolution of 6.1", 6.4", 6.5", & 12.0" in the four bands. The WISE All-Sky Release Single-Exposure images consist of 1,491,686 photometrically and astrometrically calibrated 1016x1016 pix at 2.75"/pix FITS image sets for each individual WISE exposure taken between 7 January and 6 August 2010.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA153 Dataset

WISE team

The AllWISE program builds upon the work of the successful Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission (WISE; Wright et al. 2010) by combining data from the WISE cryogenic and NEOWISE (Mainzer et al. 2011 ApJ, 731, 53) post-cryogenic survey phases to form the most comprehensive view of the full mid-infrared sky currently available. By combining the data from two complete sky coverage epochs using an advanced data processing system, AllWISE has generated new products that have enhanced photometric sensitivity and accuracy, and improved astrometric precision compared to the 2012 WISE All-Sky Data Release. Exploiting the 6 to 12 month baseline between the WISE sky coverage epochs enables AllWISE to measure source motions for the first time, and to compute improved flux variability statistics.

The AllWISE Images Atlas is comprised of 18,240 4-band calibrated 1.56°x1.56° FITS images, depth-of-coverage and noise maps, and image metadata produced by coadding nearly 7.9 million Single-exposure images from all survey phases.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA154 Dataset

The MAST Spectral/Image Scrapbook is designed to allow users to take a quick look at sample data in the MAST archive of a particular astronomical object of interest. It is set up here as an interoperability project between IRSA and MAST.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA155 Dataset

PTF team

PTF is a fully-automated, wide-field survey aimed at a systematic exploration of the optical transient sky. Level 1 data are processed single exposure images.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA156 Dataset

PTF team

PTF is a fully-automated, wide-field survey aimed at a systematic exploration of the optical transient sky. Level 2 data are coadds of Level 1 images.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA157 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

The IRAC 4-channel Photometry Catalog includes photometry in the 4 IRAC channels for all those sources that have a measured flux in IRAC Channel 1 above 1 uJy.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA158 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

This is a COSMOS X-ray group membership catalog, combining X-ray group properties from Finoguenov et al. (2007) with estimates for masses and radii calibrated from weak lensing (Leauthaud et al. 2010), and member galaxy information (George et al. 2011). Group redshifts have been determined by searching for red sequence overdensities within 500 kpc of the X-ray centers and are refined by using spectroscopic redshifts when available. We use groups with z<1 to ensure good optical identifications and small photoz uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA159 Dataset

Smolcic et al.

The catalog lists the counterpart IDs, properties, as well as the individual criteria used to classify the radio sources. For more information, see Smolcic et al. (2017).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA160 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

This catalog contains the measurements presented in:

1. Scarlata, Carollo, Lilly et al 2007, ApJS, 172, 406 (i.e., the Zurich Estimator of Structural Type [ZEST] catalog; measurements down to a limiting magnitude of I_AB=24. ZEST measurements for galaxies with half-light radii < 0 .17" are unreliable, especially for galaxies with a steep light profile)

2. Sargent, Carollo, Lilly et al 2007, ApJS, 172, 434 (i.e., Single-Sersic GIM2D fits; measurements down to a limiting magnitude of I_AB=22.5;formal GIM2D fits are also listed for approx. 2650 compulsory zCOSMOS-Bright x-ray, radio, etc. sources with I_AB > 22.5 - however, the quality of the fits deteriorates for sources substantially fainter than ~I_AB~23)

This v1.0 catalog is based on the May 2006 release of Alexie Leauthaud's ACS catalog (cut at the limits mentioned above).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA161 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA162 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

This is an I band selected multi-color catalog for 2 square degrees centered on the COSMOS field at 10:00:28.6, +02:12:21. A detailed description of the catalog is given in Capak et. al. (2007) and it is recomended that you read this paper before using the catalog.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA163 Dataset

Leauthaud et al.

The COSMOS weak lensing source catalog from Leauthaud et al. (2007).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA164 Dataset

Delvecchio et al.

The VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz AGN catalog includes classification and selected physical properties for the 3 GHz radio sample with optical/NIR counterparts (7 903 sources in total). For more information see Delvecchio et al. (2017).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA165 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

The 90 cm Very Large Array imaging of the COSMOS field comprises a circular area of 3.14 square degrees at 8.0 arcsec by 6.0 arcsec angular resolution with an average rms of 0.5 mJy/beam. The extracted catalogue contains 182 sources (down to 5.5 sigma), 30 of which are multicomponent sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA166 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

This catalog was created using u*-band priors and the EM-algorithm. Appropriate references for a description of the method are: Guillaume, M. et al. 2006, Proceedings of the SPIE, Volume 6064, pp. 332-341. This is the current reference, and contains all the basics of the method and algorithm. A more specific reference for this catalog is Zamojski et al. (2008).

The algorithm was run on the four NUV and the four FUV GALEX images covering the COSMOS field. It was run on the "-int" images (intensity maps) obtained as a product of the GALEX pipeline processing, version 1.61. The u*-band mosaic image and SExtractor catalog used as priors in this run were generously provided by Henry McCracken (IAP) and are based on CFHT-u* observations of the COSMOS field.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA167 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

The COSMOS Tasca Morphology Catalog includes morphological parameters computed using Morpheus 2005. Morphological types are estimated in three different ways; for more details see Tasca et al. (2009).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA168 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA169 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

This is the ACS catalog for the COSMOS survey that has been constructed from 575 ACS pointings. Please see Leauthaud et al. 2006, ApJ, for project and data details.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA170 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

Objects in this catalog were selected from the 2005 release of the ground-based photometry catalog, with the criterion that their I-band (auto) magnitude had to be <= 23. The IDs, ra and dec provided in this catalog correspond to those of that 2005 release.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA171 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

The reference for this catalog is George et al. (2011). This is a group membership catalog drawn from the COSMOS ACS galaxy catalog, similar to the one presented in Leauthaud et al. (2007). The main difference between this catalog and the Leauthaud et al 2007 one is that the raw ACS images have now been corrected for the effects of charge transfer inefficiency (CTI, see Massey et al. 2010 for further details). Since the CTI correction scheme slightly changes the noise properties of the raw images, the detections have also changed. For this reason, the GAL_ID field in this catalog can not be used to match to objects in the 2007 catalog. The pixel scale for this catalog is 0.03". To reference this ACS catalog please reference Leauthaud 2007 with updates presented in Leauthaud et al (in prep). This catalog is truncated at F814W (MAG_AUTO) < 24.2 due to the K-band completeness limit for stellar masses and because photoz uncertainties rise near this limit. Objects within ACS masks have also been removed (these are the same masks as in Leauthaud et al. 2007) and a variety of bad detections have been removed ("clean"=1 and "mu_class"=1) as well as galaxies without stellar masses.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA172 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

The MIPS 70 and 160 micron catalogs are described in Frayer et al. (2009).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA173 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

The COSMOS Cassata Morphology Catalog includes concentration, asymmetry, gini, and M20 measurements within the Petrosian radius. The morphological parameters are combined to classify galaxies as early-types, disks and irregulars.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA174 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

This is version 2.1 of the C-COSMOS Bright Source Catalog which consists of 1761 sources detected at uniform confidence in the 0.5 - 7 keV band of the Chandra-COSMOS survey. Details of the survey and initial results are found in the C-COSMOS catalog paper (Elvis et al. 2009, Paper I). The methods used to detect sources and generate the catalog are described in detail in Puccetti et al. 2009 (Paper II). Nearly 100%-complete multiwavelength source identification is discussed in Civano et al. 2009 (Paper III).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA175 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

These VLA data represent the additional 62 hrs of 1.4 GHz (20cm) observations of the central 7 pointings already imaged by the large project in A-configuration in February/March 2006. The observations have been combined with the large project in which the 2 square degree COSMOS field with the position given above as the center of the field was surveyed for 275 hours. The observations of the large project were performed at 1.4 GHz (20 cm), using the VLA in its A- and C-configuration between September 2004 and September 2005. The final combined survey has reached a sensitivity of an rms of uJy/beam in the central 30' at a resolution of 2.5"x2.5".

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA176 Dataset

Smolcic et al.

The catalog contains sources selected down to a 5 sigma (sigma~2.3 uJy/beam) threshold. This catalog can be used for statistical analyses, accompanied with the corrections given in the data & catalog release paper (Smolcic et al. 2016). All completeness & bias corrections and source counts presented in Smolcic et al. (2016) were calculated using this sample. The total fraction of spurious sources in the COSMOS 2 sq.deg. is below 2.7% within this catalog. However, an increase of spurious sources (up to 24% at 5.0<S/N<5.5) is present (for details see Sec. 5.2., Fig. 16 and Tab 3 in the data & catalog release paper). A subsample with a minimal spurious source fraction can be selected by requiring a signal-to-noise ratio SNR # 5.5 (see Sec. 5.2., Fig. 16 and Tab 3 in the data & catalog release paper). The total fraction of spurious sources in the COSMOS 2 sq.deg. within such a selected sample is below 0.4%, and the fraction of spurious sources is below 3% even at the lowest SNR (=5.5).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA177 Dataset

COSMOS team

COSMOS is an astronomical survey designed to probe the formation and evolution of galaxies as a function of cosmic time (redshift) and large scale structural environment. The survey covers a 2 square degree equatorial field with imaging by most of the major space-based telescopes (Hubble, Spitzer, GALEX, XMM, Chandra) and a number of large ground based telescopes (Subaru, VLA, ESO-VLT, UKIRT, NOAO, CFHT, and others). Over 2 million galaxies are detected, spanning 75% of the age of the universe.

The MIPS 70 and 160 micron catalogs are described in Frayer et al. (2009).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA178 Dataset

COSMOS Project

The COSMOS Archive serves data taken for the Cosmic Evolution Survey with HST (COSMOS) project, using IRSA's general search service, Atlas. COSMOS is an HST Treasury Project to survey a 2 square degree equatorial field with the ACS camera.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA179 Dataset

Hiroshi Murakami, Masahiro Tanaka, Issei Yamamura

The Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS) is a cryogenically cooled, small infrared telescope that flew from March - April in 1995. It surveyed approximately 10% of the sky with a relatively wide beam during its 20 day mission.

Four focal-plane instruments , the Near-Infrared Spectrometer (NIRS), the Mid-Infrared Spectrometer (MIRS), the Far-Infrared Line Mapper (FILM), and the Far-Infrared Photometer (FIRP) made simultaneous observations of the sky at wavelengths ranging from 1 to 1000 um.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA180 Dataset

AKARI team

The AKARI/FIS Bright Source Catalogue Version 1.0 provides the positions and fluxes of 427,071 point sources in the four far-infrared wavelengths centred at 65, 90, 140, and 160 microns. The sensitivity in the 90 micron band is about 0.55 Jy.

The Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) instrument scanned 98 percent of the entire sky more than twice during the 16 months of the cryogenic mission phase. The AKARI/FIS Bright Source Catalogue is the primary data product from the AKARI survey. The catalogue is designed to have a uniform detection limit (corresponding to per scan sensitivity) over the entire sky (except for high background regions where a different data acquisition mode was used). Redundant observations are used to increase the reliability of the detection.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA181 Dataset

AKARI team

The AKARI/IRC Point Source Catalogue Version 1.0 provides positions and fluxes of 870,973 sources (844,649 sources in 9 micron band and 194,551 sources in 18 micron band) in the Mid-Infrared wavelengths.

The IRC scanned 96 / 97 percent of the entire sky in 9 / 18 micron band twice or more during the 16 months of the cryogenic mission phase. The Point Source Catalogue is the primary catalogue from the AKARI IRC survey. The catalogue is designed to have a uniform detection limit over the entire sky, based on the uniform source detection limit per scan observation. Redundant observations are used to increase the reliability of the detection.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA182 Dataset

IRSA

This is IRSA's Hierarchical Progressive Survey (HiPS) node. HiPS is a hierarchical scheme for the description, stoage, and access of sky survey data. The system is based on hierarchical tiling of sky regions at finer and finer spatial resolution which facilitates a progressive view of a survey, and supports multi-resolution zooming and panning.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA183 Dataset

GOALS team

The GOALS sample consists of a total of 179 LIRGs (log (L_IR/L_sun) = 11.0-11.99) and 22 ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs: log (L_IR/L_sun) > 12.0) selected from the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample; these 201 objects comprise a statistically complete flux-limited sample of infrared-luminous galaxies in the local universe. The GOALS objects have been the subject of an intense multi-wavelength observing campaign, including space-based imaging and spectroscopy from Spitzer and Herschel.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA184 Dataset

Ardila et al.

The Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra presents IRS Short-Low and Long-Low spectra of 159 stars selected to provide a complete sampling of the HR diagram.

The SASS Catalog presents the spectral type, luminosity type, color, metallicity, and photometry for each star in the Atlas.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA185 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

Objects in the single band catalogs are not required to have any counterparts in the other band. They are cut at CSNR > 5 and also have the low coverage areas at the edges of the survey omitted (POLY=1), resulting in a single-band reliability flag REL=1. They are thus deeper than the 2-band high reliability catalogs. These should be used if you are matching with a reliable catalog from another band (e.g. near-infrared), and simply want as many matches as possible, or are doing a statistical study.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA186 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

Objects in the single band catalogs are not required to have any counterparts in the other band. They are cut at CSNR > 5 and also have the low coverage areas at the edges of the survey omitted (POLY=1), resulting in a single-band reliability flag REL=1. They are thus deeper than the 2-band high reliability catalogs. These should be used if you are matching with a reliable catalog from another band (e.g. near-infrared), and simply want as many matches as possible, or are doing a statistical study.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA187 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

Objects in the single band catalogs are not required to have any counterparts in the other band. They are cut at CSNR > 5 and also have the low coverage areas at the edges of the survey omitted (POLY=1), resulting in a single-band reliability flag REL=1. They are thus deeper than the 2-band high reliability catalogs. These should be used if you are matching with a reliable catalog from another band (e.g. near-infrared), and simply want as many matches as possible, or are doing a statistical study.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA188 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

Objects in the single band catalogs are not required to have any counterparts in the other band. They are cut at CSNR > 5 and also have the low coverage areas at the edges of the survey omitted (POLY=1), resulting in a single-band reliability flag REL=1. They are thus deeper than the 2-band high reliability catalogs. These should be used if you are matching with a reliable catalog from another band (e.g. near-infrared), and simply want as many matches as possible, or are doing a statistical study.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA189 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

Objects in the single band catalogs are not required to have any counterparts in the other band. They are cut at CSNR > 5 and also have the low coverage areas at the edges of the survey omitted (POLY=1), resulting in a single-band reliability flag REL=1. They are thus deeper than the 2-band high reliability catalogs. These should be used if you are matching with a reliable catalog from another band (e.g. near-infrared), and simply want as many matches as possible, or are doing a statistical study.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA190 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

Objects in the single band catalogs are not required to have any counterparts in the other band. They are cut at CSNR > 5 and also have the low coverage areas at the edges of the survey omitted (POLY=1), resulting in a single-band reliability flag REL=1. They are thus deeper than the 2-band high reliability catalogs. These should be used if you are matching with a reliable catalog from another band (e.g. near-infrared), and simply want as many matches as possible, or are doing a statistical study.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA191 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

The 2-band high reliability catalogs are matched [3.6] and [4.5] catalogs, with the low coverage areas near the edges of the survey omitted (POLY_12=1). These catalogs should be used if you are using SERVS to select your sample, as objects in this catalog should be highly reliable (>99.9%). To appear in the catalog objects must appear in both bands, and the detection in one band must be > 10-sigma in CSNR, where CSNR is the coverage-weighted signal-to-noise ratio.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA192 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

The 2-band high reliability catalogs are matched [3.6] and [4.5] catalogs, with the low coverage areas near the edges of the survey omitted (POLY_12=1). These catalogs should be used if you are using SERVS to select your sample, as objects in this catalog should be highly reliable (>99.9%). To appear in the catalog objects must appear in both bands, and the detection in one band must be > 10-sigma in CSNR, where CSNR is the coverage-weighted signal-to-noise ratio.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA193 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

Objects in the single band catalogs are not required to have any counterparts in the other band. They are cut at CSNR > 5 and also have the low coverage areas at the edges of the survey omitted (POLY=1), resulting in a single-band reliability flag REL=1. They are thus deeper than the 2-band high reliability catalogs. These should be used if you are matching with a reliable catalog from another band (e.g. near-infrared), and simply want as many matches as possible, or are doing a statistical study.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA194 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

The 2-band high reliability catalogs are matched [3.6] and [4.5] catalogs, with the low coverage areas near the edges of the survey omitted (POLY_12=1). These catalogs should be used if you are using SERVS to select your sample, as objects in this catalog should be highly reliable (>99.9%). To appear in the catalog objects must appear in both bands, and the detection in one band must be > 10-sigma in CSNR, where CSNR is the coverage-weighted signal-to-noise ratio.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA195 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

Objects in the single band catalogs are not required to have any counterparts in the other band. They are cut at CSNR > 5 and also have the low coverage areas at the edges of the survey omitted (POLY=1), resulting in a single-band reliability flag REL=1. They are thus deeper than the 2-band high reliability catalogs. These should be used if you are matching with a reliable catalog from another band (e.g. near-infrared), and simply want as many matches as possible, or are doing a statistical study.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA196 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

Objects in the single band catalogs are not required to have any counterparts in the other band. They are cut at CSNR > 5 and also have the low coverage areas at the edges of the survey omitted (POLY=1), resulting in a single-band reliability flag REL=1. They are thus deeper than the 2-band high reliability catalogs. These should be used if you are matching with a reliable catalog from another band (e.g. near-infrared), and simply want as many matches as possible, or are doing a statistical study.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA197 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

Objects in the single band catalogs are not required to have any counterparts in the other band. They are cut at CSNR > 5 and also have the low coverage areas at the edges of the survey omitted (POLY=1), resulting in a single-band reliability flag REL=1. They are thus deeper than the 2-band high reliability catalogs. These should be used if you are matching with a reliable catalog from another band (e.g. near-infrared), and simply want as many matches as possible, or are doing a statistical study.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA198 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

Objects in the single band catalogs are not required to have any counterparts in the other band. They are cut at CSNR > 5 and also have the low coverage areas at the edges of the survey omitted (POLY=1), resulting in a single-band reliability flag REL=1. They are thus deeper than the 2-band high reliability catalogs. These should be used if you are matching with a reliable catalog from another band (e.g. near-infrared), and simply want as many matches as possible, or are doing a statistical study.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA199 Dataset

SERVS team

The "Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey" (SERVS) Exploration Science program conducted deep IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations of five extragalactic fields (ELAIS-N1, Lockman Hole, XMM, ELAIS-S1, and CDFS).

Objects in the single band catalogs are not required to have any counterparts in the other band. They are cut at CSNR > 5 and also have the low coverage areas at the edges of the survey omitted (POLY=1), resulting in a single-band reliability flag REL=1. They are thus deeper than the 2-band high reliability catalogs. These should be used if you are matching with a reliable catalog from another band (e.g. near-infrared), and simply want as many matches as possible, or are doing a statistical study.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA200 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSEII) imaged longitudes ±10◦ of the central region of the Galaxy. The latitude coverage is ±1◦ from |l| =10◦to 5◦, ±1.5◦ from |l| =5◦to 2◦, and ±2◦ from |l| =2◦to 0◦. GLIMPSEII coverage excludes the Galactic center region l=±1◦, b=±0.75◦ observed by the GALCEN GO program (PID=3677). GLIMPSEII had two-epoch coverage for a total of three visits on the sky. The observations consisted of two 1.2 second integrations at each position in the first epoch of data taking (September 2005) and a single 1.2 second integration at each position six months later (April 2006).

The GLIMPSEII Catalog (GLMIIC, or the "Catalog") consists of point sources whose selection criteria are determined by the requirement that the reliability be >99.5%. There is a range of limiting magnitudes depending on whether the source is in a sparsely populated or low background region or in a region of high diffuse background or high source density. The photometric uncertainty is typically < 0.2 mag.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA201 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

Deep GLIMPSE is the sixth in a series of large area projects to map regions of the Galactic plane using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). Deep GLIMPSE is a Warm Mission Spitzer Cycle 8 Exploration Science Program (PIDs 80074 and 80253) that mapped 125 degrees of longitude of the Far Side of the Galaxy. Warm Mission Spitzer has two IRAC bands, centered at approximately 3.6 and 4.5 μm. The Galactic longitudes covered by Deep GLIMPSE are l=265◦-350◦and 25◦-65◦. The latitude width is about 2.1◦. The latitude center follows the Galactic warp at a Galactocentric distance of 13 kpc to survey the Far Outer Galaxy.

The Deep GLIMPSE Archive (GLMDPA or the “Archive”) consists of point sources with less stringent selection critera than the Catalog. The information provided is in the same format as the Catalog. The Catalog is a subset of the Archive, but the entries for a particular source might not be the same due to additional nulling of magnitudes in the Catalog because of the more stringent requirements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA202 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The APOGLIMPSE project re-images 53 square degrees of the inner Galactic plane that have also been targeted by the APOGEE/APOGEE-2 surveys - Sloan III and IV programs to obtain high resolution H band spectroscopy for hundreds of thousands of red giants. The data will be combined with the original GLIMPSE observations of the Galactic plane in 2004-2005 to measure the proper motions of the sources along the Galactic plane over the past decade.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA203 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

GLIMPSE3D is the third in a series of large area projects to map selected regions of the Galactic plane using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). GLIMPSEI1 covered the Galactic plane from |l| = 10◦ to 65◦ and |b| < 1◦; GLIMPSEII filled in the inner 20 degrees of the Galactic plane, |l| < 10◦, with vertical extensions up to ±1.5◦ for |l| =5◦to 2◦, and up to ±2◦ from |l| =2◦to 0◦. GLIMPSE3D adds vertical extensions, generally up to |b| < 3◦, but up to |b| < 4.2◦ in the center of the Galaxy. The goal of this coverage is to provide data to study the vertical stellar and interstellar

The GLIMPSE3D Archive (GLM3DA or the “Archive”) consists of point sources with a signal- to-noise > 5 in at least one band and less stringent selection critera than the Catalog. The photometric uncertainty is typically < 0.3 mag. The GLIMPSE3D Catalog is a subset of the Archive, but note that the entries for a particular source might not be the same due to additional nulling of magnitudes in the Catalog because of the more stringent requirements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA204 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

Vela-Carina is the fourth in a series of large area projects to map selected regions of the Galactic plane using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). The Vela-Carina project (PID=40791) (Majewski et al. 2007, Zasowski et al. 2009) extended GLIMPSE-style coverage (two 1.2 second integrations at each position) to Galactic longitudes 255◦< l < 295◦ covering 86 square degrees of the Carina and Vela regions of the Galactic plane.

The Vela-Carina Archive (VelaCarA or the “Archive”), consists of point sources with a signal- to-noise > 5 in at least one band and less stringent selection critera than the Catalog. The photometric uncertainty is typically < 0.3 mag. The information provided is in the same format as the Catalog. The Catalog is a subset of the Archive, but note that the entries for a particular source might not be the same due to additional nulling of magnitudes in the Catalog because of the more stringent requirements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA205 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

GLIMPSE360 is a Warm Mission Spitzer Cycle 6 Exploration Science Program (PIDs 60020, 61070, 61071, 61072, 61073, 70072) that mapped 187 degrees of longitude of the Galactic plane that have not been mapped by previous Spitzer Galactic Plane surveys (GLIMPSE, GLIMPSEII, GALCEN, GLIMPSE3D, Vela Carina, SMOG and Cygnus-X). The specific Galactic longitudes covered by GLIMPSE360 are l=65◦-76◦, 82◦-102◦, and 109◦-265◦. The latitude range is about 2.8◦. The latitude center follows the Galactic warp. GLIMPSE360 completes the full circle of the Galactic plane.

The GLIMPSE360 Archive (GLM360A or the “Archive”) consists of point sources with less stringent selection critera than the Catalog. The information provided is in the same format as the Catalog. The Catalog is a subset of the Archive, but the entries for a particular source might not be the same due to additional nulling of magnitudes in the Catalog because of the more stringent requirements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA206 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSEII) imaged longitudes ±10◦ of the central region of the Galaxy. The latitude coverage is ±1◦ from |l| =10◦to 5◦, ±1.5◦ from |l| =5◦to 2◦, and ±2◦ from |l| =2◦to 0◦. GLIMPSEII coverage excludes the Galactic center region l=±1◦, b=±0.75◦ observed by the GALCEN GO program (PID=3677). GLIMPSEII had two-epoch coverage for a total of three visits on the sky. The observations consisted of two 1.2 second integrations at each position in the first epoch of data taking (September 2005) and a single 1.2 second integration at each position six months later (April 2006).

The GLIMPSEII Archive (GLMIIA or the “Archive”) consists of point sources with a signal- to-noise > 5 in at least one band and less stringent selection critera than the Catalog. The photometric uncertainty is typically < 0.3 mag. The GLIMPSEII Catalog is a subset of the Archive, but note that the entries for a particular source might not be the same due to additional nulling of magnitudes in the Catalog because of the more stringent requirements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA207 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The GLIMPSE Proper project re-images about 43 square degrees of the Galactic center to measure the proper motions of millions of sources within 5 degrees of the Galactic center over the last decade.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA208 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

GLIMPSE3D is the third in a series of large area projects to map selected regions of the Galactic plane using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). GLIMPSEI1 covered the Galactic plane from |l| = 10◦ to 65◦ and |b| < 1◦; GLIMPSEII filled in the inner 20 degrees of the Galactic plane, |l| < 10◦, with vertical extensions up to ±1.5◦ for |l| =5◦to 2◦, and up to ±2◦ from |l| =2◦to 0◦. GLIMPSE3D adds vertical extensions, generally up to |b| < 3◦, but up to |b| < 4.2◦ in the center of the Galaxy. The goal of this coverage is to provide data to study the vertical stellar and interstellar

The GLIMPSE3D More Reliable Archive (GLM3DMRA) consists of the higher reliability point sources than the Archive. It was produced for the single visit epoch 2 only source lists to provide a higher reliability source list than the Archive. No highly reliable Catalog is produced for this dataset since it requires a source be detected twice in one band. The sources in the More Reliable Archive have the same stringent criteria as the Catalog except two detections are not required in a single band. Two detections in adjacent bands are required (the “1” can include the 2MASS Ks band); for example one detection in band 1 and one detection in band 2.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA209 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The GLIMPSE Proper project re-images about 43 square degrees of the Galactic center to measure the proper motions of millions of sources within 5 degrees of the Galactic center over the last decade.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA210 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSEI), using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) surveyed approximately 220 square degrees of the Galactic plane, covering a latitude range of ±1◦, and a longitude range of |l| =10◦−65◦, plus the Observation Strategy Validation (OSV) region at l=284◦. The observations consisted of two 1.2 second integrations at each position, for a total of over 77,000 pointings and ∼310,000 IRAC frames in 400 hours total survey time. The survey consists of a point source Catalog, a point source Archive, and mosaicked images.

The GLIMPSEI Archive (GLMIA or the “Archive”) consists of point sources with a signal- to-noise > 5 in at least one band and less stringent selection critera than the Catalog. The photometric uncertainty is typically < 0.3 mag. The GLIMPSEI Catalog is a subset of the Archive, but note that the entries for a particular source might not be the same due to additional nulling of magnitudes in the Catalog because of the more stringent requirements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA211 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

GLIMPSE3D is the third in a series of large area projects to map selected regions of the Galactic plane using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). GLIMPSEI1 covered the Galactic plane from |l| = 10◦ to 65◦ and |b| < 1◦; GLIMPSEII filled in the inner 20 degrees of the Galactic plane, |l| < 10◦, with vertical extensions up to ±1.5◦ for |l| =5◦to 2◦, and up to ±2◦ from |l| =2◦to 0◦. GLIMPSE3D adds vertical extensions, generally up to |b| < 3◦, but up to |b| < 4.2◦ in the center of the Galaxy. The goal of this coverage is to provide data to study the vertical stellar and interstellar

The GLIMPSE3D Archive (GLM3DA or the “Archive”) consists of point sources with a signal- to-noise > 5 in at least one band and less stringent selection critera than the Catalog. The photometric uncertainty is typically < 0.3 mag. The GLIMPSE3D Catalog is a subset of the Archive, but note that the entries for a particular source might not be the same due to additional nulling of magnitudes in the Catalog because of the more stringent requirements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA212 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSEII) imaged longitudes ±10◦ of the central region of the Galaxy. The latitude coverage is ±1◦ from |l| =10◦to 5◦, ±1.5◦ from |l| =5◦to 2◦, and ±2◦ from |l| =2◦to 0◦. GLIMPSEII coverage excludes the Galactic center region l=±1◦, b=±0.75◦ observed by the GALCEN GO program (PID=3677). GLIMPSEII had two-epoch coverage for a total of three visits on the sky. The observations consisted of two 1.2 second integrations at each position in the first epoch of data taking (September 2005) and a single 1.2 second integration at each position six months later (April 2006).

The GLIMPSEII Epoch 2 More Reliable Archive (GLMIIEp2MRA) consists of higher reliability point sources than the Archive. It was produced for the single visit epoch 2 only source lists to provide a higher reliability source list than the Archive. No highly reliable Catalog is produced for this dataset since it requires a source be detected twice in one band. The sources in the More Reliable Archive have the same stringent criteria as the Catalog except two detections are not required in a single band. Two detections in adjacent bands are required (the “1” can include the 2MASS Ks band); for example one detection in band 1 and one detection in band 2.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA213 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

Vela-Carina is the fourth in a series of large area projects to map selected regions of the Galactic plane using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). The Vela-Carina project (PID=40791) (Majewski et al. 2007, Zasowski et al. 2009) extended GLIMPSE-style coverage (two 1.2 second integrations at each position) to Galactic longitudes 255◦< l < 295◦ covering 86 square degrees of the Carina and Vela regions of the Galactic plane.

The Vela-Carina Catalog (VelaCarC, or the “Catalog”), consists of the highest reliability point sources. To be in the Catalog, sources must be detected at least twice in one IRAC band and at least once in an adjacent band, which we call a “2+1” criterion, where the “1” can include the 2MASS Ks band. This yields a Vela-Carina Catalog with a reliability greater than 99.5%; that is, only five sources in a thousand are expected to be spurious. For each IRAC band the Catalog provides fluxes (with uncertainties), positions (with uncer- tainties), the areal density of local point sources, the local sky brightness, and a flag that provides information on source quality and known anomalies present in the data.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA214 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

GLIMPSE360 is a Warm Mission Spitzer Cycle 6 Exploration Science Program (PIDs 60020, 61070, 61071, 61072, 61073, 70072) that mapped 187 degrees of longitude of the Galactic plane that have not been mapped by previous Spitzer Galactic Plane surveys (GLIMPSE, GLIMPSEII, GALCEN, GLIMPSE3D, Vela Carina, SMOG and Cygnus-X). The specific Galactic longitudes covered by GLIMPSE360 are l=65◦-76◦, 82◦-102◦, and 109◦-265◦. The latitude range is about 2.8◦. The latitude center follows the Galactic warp. GLIMPSE360 completes the full circle of the Galactic plane.

The GLIMPSE360 Catalog (GLM360C, or the “Catalog”) consists of the highest reliability point sources. For each IRAC band the Catalog provides fluxes (with uncertainties), positions (with uncertainties), the areal density of local point sources, the local sky brightness, and a flag that provides information on source quality and known anomalies present in the data.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA215 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The APOGLIMPSE project re-images 53 square degrees of the inner Galactic plane that have also been targeted by the APOGEE/APOGEE-2 surveys - Sloan III and IV programs to obtain high resolution H band spectroscopy for hundreds of thousands of red giants. The data will be combined with the original GLIMPSE observations of the Galactic plane in 2004-2005 to measure the proper motions of the sources along the Galactic plane over the past decade.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA216 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

GLIMPSE3D is the third in a series of large area projects to map selected regions of the Galactic plane using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). GLIMPSEI1 covered the Galactic plane from |l| = 10◦ to 65◦ and |b| < 1◦; GLIMPSEII filled in the inner 20 degrees of the Galactic plane, |l| < 10◦, with vertical extensions up to ±1.5◦ for |l| =5◦to 2◦, and up to ±2◦ from |l| =2◦to 0◦. GLIMPSE3D adds vertical extensions, generally up to |b| < 3◦, but up to |b| < 4.2◦ in the center of the Galaxy. The goal of this coverage is to provide data to study the vertical stellar and interstellar

The GLIMPSE3D Archive (GLM3DA or the “Archive”) consists of point sources with a signal- to-noise > 5 in at least one band and less stringent selection critera than the Catalog. The photometric uncertainty is typically < 0.3 mag. The GLIMPSE3D Catalog is a subset of the Archive, but note that the entries for a particular source might not be the same due to additional nulling of magnitudes in the Catalog because of the more stringent requirements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA217 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

Deep GLIMPSE is the sixth in a series of large area projects to map regions of the Galactic plane using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). Deep GLIMPSE is a Warm Mission Spitzer Cycle 8 Exploration Science Program (PIDs 80074 and 80253) that mapped 125 degrees of longitude of the Far Side of the Galaxy. Warm Mission Spitzer has two IRAC bands, centered at approximately 3.6 and 4.5 μm. The Galactic longitudes covered by Deep GLIMPSE are l=265◦-350◦and 25◦-65◦. The latitude width is about 2.1◦. The latitude center follows the Galactic warp at a Galactocentric distance of 13 kpc to survey the Far Outer Galaxy.

The Deep GLIMPSE Catalog (GLMDPC, or the “Catalog”) consists of the highest reliability point sources. For each IRAC band the Catalog provides fluxes (with uncertainties), positions (with uncertainties), the areal density of local point sources, the local sky brightness, and a flag that provides information on source quality and known anomalies present in the data.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA218 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The Spitzer Mapping of the Outer Galaxy (SMOG; Carey et al. 2008) project mapped a 21 square degree area with IRAC & MIPS (l=102d to 109d , b=0d to 3d) of the Outer Galaxy. The SMOG IRAC data have been processed by the Wisconsin GLIMPSE IRAC pipeline. There are two types of source lists: a high reliability point source Catalog and a more complete point source Archive.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA219 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSEII) imaged longitudes ±10◦ of the central region of the Galaxy. The latitude coverage is ±1◦ from |l| =10◦to 5◦, ±1.5◦ from |l| =5◦to 2◦, and ±2◦ from |l| =2◦to 0◦. GLIMPSEII coverage excludes the Galactic center region l=±1◦, b=±0.75◦ observed by the GALCEN GO program (PID=3677). GLIMPSEII had two-epoch coverage for a total of three visits on the sky. The observations consisted of two 1.2 second integrations at each position in the first epoch of data taking (September 2005) and a single 1.2 second integration at each position six months later (April 2006).

The GLIMPSEII Archive (GLMIIA or the “Archive”) consists of point sources with a signal- to-noise > 5 in at least one band and less stringent selection critera than the Catalog. The photometric uncertainty is typically < 0.3 mag. The GLIMPSEII Catalog is a subset of the Archive, but note that the entries for a particular source might not be the same due to additional nulling of magnitudes in the Catalog because of the more stringent requirements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA220 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSEII) imaged longitudes ±10◦ of the central region of the Galaxy. The latitude coverage is ±1◦ from |l| =10◦to 5◦, ±1.5◦ from |l| =5◦to 2◦, and ±2◦ from |l| =2◦to 0◦. GLIMPSEII coverage excludes the Galactic center region l=±1◦, b=±0.75◦ observed by the GALCEN GO program (PID=3677). GLIMPSEII had two-epoch coverage for a total of three visits on the sky. The observations consisted of two 1.2 second integrations at each position in the first epoch of data taking (September 2005) and a single 1.2 second integration at each position six months later (April 2006).

The GLIMPSEII Archive (GLMIIA or the “Archive”) consists of point sources with a signal- to-noise > 5 in at least one band and less stringent selection critera than the Catalog. The photometric uncertainty is typically < 0.3 mag. The GLIMPSEII Catalog is a subset of the Archive, but note that the entries for a particular source might not be the same due to additional nulling of magnitudes in the Catalog because of the more stringent requirements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA221 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

GLIMPSE3D is the third in a series of large area projects to map selected regions of the Galactic plane using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). GLIMPSEI1 covered the Galactic plane from |l| = 10◦ to 65◦ and |b| < 1◦; GLIMPSEII filled in the inner 20 degrees of the Galactic plane, |l| < 10◦, with vertical extensions up to ±1.5◦ for |l| =5◦to 2◦, and up to ±2◦ from |l| =2◦to 0◦. GLIMPSE3D adds vertical extensions, generally up to |b| < 3◦, but up to |b| < 4.2◦ in the center of the Galaxy. The goal of this coverage is to provide data to study the vertical stellar and interstellar

The GLIMPSE3D Archive (GLM3DA or the “Archive”) consists of point sources with a signal- to-noise > 5 in at least one band and less stringent selection critera than the Catalog. The photometric uncertainty is typically < 0.3 mag. The GLIMPSE3D Catalog is a subset of the Archive, but note that the entries for a particular source might not be the same due to additional nulling of magnitudes in the Catalog because of the more stringent requirements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA222 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The Cygnus-X Catalog and Archive contain sources from longitudes l=76-82d extracted from data processed using the GLIMPSE pipeline. There are two types of source lists: a high reliability point source Catalog and a more complete point source Archive.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA223 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSEI), using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) surveyed approximately 220 square degrees of the Galactic plane, covering a latitude range of ±1◦, and a longitude range of |l| =10◦−65◦, plus the Observation Strategy Validation (OSV) region at l=284◦. The observations consisted of two 1.2 second integrations at each position, for a total of over 77,000 pointings and ∼310,000 IRAC frames in 400 hours total survey time. The survey consists of a point source Catalog, a point source Archive, and mosaicked images.

The GLIMPSEI Catalog (GLMIC, or the “Catalog”) consists of point sources whose selection criteria are determined by the requirement that the reliability be ≥99.5%. There is a range of limiting magnitudes depending on whether the source is in a sparsely populated or low background region or in a region of high diffuse background or high source density. The photometric uncertainty is typically < 0.2 mag.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA224 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

GLIMPSE3D is the third in a series of large area projects to map selected regions of the Galactic plane using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). GLIMPSEI1 covered the Galactic plane from |l| = 10◦ to 65◦ and |b| < 1◦; GLIMPSEII filled in the inner 20 degrees of the Galactic plane, |l| < 10◦, with vertical extensions up to ±1.5◦ for |l| =5◦to 2◦, and up to ±2◦ from |l| =2◦to 0◦. GLIMPSE3D adds vertical extensions, generally up to |b| < 3◦, but up to |b| < 4.2◦ in the center of the Galaxy. The goal of this coverage is to provide data to study the vertical stellar and interstellar

The GLIMPSE3D Archive (GLM3DA or the “Archive”) consists of point sources with a signal- to-noise > 5 in at least one band and less stringent selection critera than the Catalog. The photometric uncertainty is typically < 0.3 mag. The GLIMPSE3D Catalog is a subset of the Archive, but note that the entries for a particular source might not be the same due to additional nulling of magnitudes in the Catalog because of the more stringent requirements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA225 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The Cygnus-X Catalog and Archive contain sources from longitudes l=76-82d extracted from data processed using the GLIMPSE pipeline. There are two types of source lists: a high reliability point source Catalog and a more complete point source Archive.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA226 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The Spitzer Mapping of the Outer Galaxy (SMOG; Carey et al. 2008) project mapped a 21 square degree area with IRAC & MIPS (l=102d to 109d , b=0d to 3d) of the Outer Galaxy. The SMOG IRAC data have been processed by the Wisconsin GLIMPSE IRAC pipeline. There are two types of source lists: a high reliability point source Catalog and a more complete point source Archive.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA227 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSEII) imaged longitudes ±10◦ of the central region of the Galaxy. The latitude coverage is ±1◦ from |l| =10◦to 5◦, ±1.5◦ from |l| =5◦to 2◦, and ±2◦ from |l| =2◦to 0◦. GLIMPSEII coverage excludes the Galactic center region l=±1◦, b=±0.75◦ observed by the GALCEN GO program (PID=3677). GLIMPSEII had two-epoch coverage for a total of three visits on the sky. The observations consisted of two 1.2 second integrations at each position in the first epoch of data taking (September 2005) and a single 1.2 second integration at each position six months later (April 2006).

The GLIMPSEII Archive (GLMIIA or the “Archive”) consists of point sources with a signal- to-noise > 5 in at least one band and less stringent selection critera than the Catalog. The photometric uncertainty is typically < 0.3 mag. The GLIMPSEII Catalog is a subset of the Archive, but note that the entries for a particular source might not be the same due to additional nulling of magnitudes in the Catalog because of the more stringent requirements.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA228 Dataset

YSOVAR team

The YSOVAR (Young Stellar Object VARiability) Spitzer Space Telescope observing program obtained the first extensive mid-infrared (IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron) time series photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster plus smaller fields in 11 other star-forming cores (AFGL 490, NGC 1333, Mon R2, GGD 12-15, NGC 2264, L1688, Serpens Main, Serpens South, IRAS 20050+2720, IC 1396A, and Ceph C). There are ~29,000 unique objects with light curves in either or both IRAC channels in the YSOVAR data set. YSOVAR is a sister project to the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264 (CSI 2264; Cody et al. 2014). Initial YSOVAR results were described in Morales-Calderon et al. (2011). Rebull et al. (2014) describes the details of target selection, data reduction, and other conventions established for this project.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA229 Dataset

YSOVAR team

The YSOVAR (Young Stellar Object VARiability) Spitzer Space Telescope observing program obtained the first extensive mid-infrared (IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron) time series photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster plus smaller fields in 11 other star-forming cores (AFGL 490, NGC 1333, Mon R2, GGD 12-15, NGC 2264, L1688, Serpens Main, Serpens South, IRAS 20050+2720, IC 1396A, and Ceph C). There are ~29,000 unique objects with light curves in either or both IRAC channels in the YSOVAR data set. YSOVAR is a sister project to the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264 (CSI 2264; Cody et al. 2014). Initial YSOVAR results were described in Morales-Calderon et al. (2011). Rebull et al. (2014) describes the details of target selection, data reduction, and other conventions established for this project.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA230 Dataset

YSOVAR team

The YSOVAR (Young Stellar Object VARiability) Spitzer Space Telescope observing program obtained the first extensive mid-infrared (IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron) time series photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster plus smaller fields in 11 other star-forming cores (AFGL 490, NGC 1333, Mon R2, GGD 12-15, NGC 2264, L1688, Serpens Main, Serpens South, IRAS 20050+2720, IC 1396A, and Ceph C). There are ~29,000 unique objects with light curves in either or both IRAC channels in the YSOVAR data set. YSOVAR is a sister project to the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264 (CSI 2264; Cody et al. 2014). Initial YSOVAR results were described in Morales-Calderon et al. (2011). Rebull et al. (2014) describes the details of target selection, data reduction, and other conventions established for this project.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA231 Dataset

YSOVAR team

The YSOVAR (Young Stellar Object VARiability) Spitzer Space Telescope observing program obtained the first extensive mid-infrared (IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron) time series photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster plus smaller fields in 11 other star-forming cores (AFGL 490, NGC 1333, Mon R2, GGD 12-15, NGC 2264, L1688, Serpens Main, Serpens South, IRAS 20050+2720, IC 1396A, and Ceph C). There are ~29,000 unique objects with light curves in either or both IRAC channels in the YSOVAR data set. YSOVAR is a sister project to the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264 (CSI 2264; Cody et al. 2014). Initial YSOVAR results were described in Morales-Calderon et al. (2011). Rebull et al. (2014) describes the details of target selection, data reduction, and other conventions established for this project.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA232 Dataset

YSOVAR team

The YSOVAR (Young Stellar Object VARiability) Spitzer Space Telescope observing program obtained the first extensive mid-infrared (IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron) time series photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster plus smaller fields in 11 other star-forming cores (AFGL 490, NGC 1333, Mon R2, GGD 12-15, NGC 2264, L1688, Serpens Main, Serpens South, IRAS 20050+2720, IC 1396A, and Ceph C). There are ~29,000 unique objects with light curves in either or both IRAC channels in the YSOVAR data set. YSOVAR is a sister project to the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264 (CSI 2264; Cody et al. 2014). Initial YSOVAR results were described in Morales-Calderon et al. (2011). Rebull et al. (2014) describes the details of target selection, data reduction, and other conventions established for this project.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA233 Dataset

YSOVAR team

The YSOVAR (Young Stellar Object VARiability) Spitzer Space Telescope observing program obtained the first extensive mid-infrared (IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron) time series photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster plus smaller fields in 11 other star-forming cores (AFGL 490, NGC 1333, Mon R2, GGD 12-15, NGC 2264, L1688, Serpens Main, Serpens South, IRAS 20050+2720, IC 1396A, and Ceph C). There are ~29,000 unique objects with light curves in either or both IRAC channels in the YSOVAR data set. YSOVAR is a sister project to the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264 (CSI 2264; Cody et al. 2014). Initial YSOVAR results were described in Morales-Calderon et al. (2011). Rebull et al. (2014) describes the details of target selection, data reduction, and other conventions established for this project.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA234 Dataset

YSOVAR team

The YSOVAR (Young Stellar Object VARiability) Spitzer Space Telescope observing program obtained the first extensive mid-infrared (IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron) time series photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster plus smaller fields in 11 other star-forming cores (AFGL 490, NGC 1333, Mon R2, GGD 12-15, NGC 2264, L1688, Serpens Main, Serpens South, IRAS 20050+2720, IC 1396A, and Ceph C). There are ~29,000 unique objects with light curves in either or both IRAC channels in the YSOVAR data set. YSOVAR is a sister project to the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264 (CSI 2264; Cody et al. 2014). Initial YSOVAR results were described in Morales-Calderon et al. (2011). Rebull et al. (2014) describes the details of target selection, data reduction, and other conventions established for this project.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA235 Dataset

YSOVAR team

The YSOVAR (Young Stellar Object VARiability) Spitzer Space Telescope observing program obtained the first extensive mid-infrared (IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron) time series photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster plus smaller fields in 11 other star-forming cores (AFGL 490, NGC 1333, Mon R2, GGD 12-15, NGC 2264, L1688, Serpens Main, Serpens South, IRAS 20050+2720, IC 1396A, and Ceph C). There are ~29,000 unique objects with light curves in either or both IRAC channels in the YSOVAR data set. YSOVAR is a sister project to the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264 (CSI 2264; Cody et al. 2014). Initial YSOVAR results were described in Morales-Calderon et al. (2011). Rebull et al. (2014) describes the details of target selection, data reduction, and other conventions established for this project.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA236 Dataset

Boyer et al. 2015

DUSTiNGS consists of a sample of 50 dwarf galaxies within 1.5 Mpc, which have been mapped with IRAC channels 1 and 2 (3.6 and 4.5 microns). The sample consists of 37 dwarf spheroidal, 8 dwarf irregular, and 5 transition-type galaxies.

The DUSTiNGS data release includes images and source catalogs based on uniform Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations. The catalogs are available in "full" and "good" versions, where quality cuts based on photometric accuracy and source morphology have been applied to the latter. See Boyer et al. (2015) for details.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA237 Dataset

Boyer et al. 2015

DUSTiNGS consists of a sample of 50 dwarf galaxies within 1.5 Mpc, which have been mapped with IRAC channels 1 and 2 (3.6 and 4.5 microns). The sample consists of 37 dwarf spheroidal, 8 dwarf irregular, and 5 transition-type galaxies.

The DUSTiNGS data release includes images and source catalogs based on uniform Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations. The catalogs are available in "full" and "good" versions, where quality cuts based on photometric accuracy and source morphology have been applied to the latter. See Boyer et al. (2015) for details.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA238 Dataset

Bendo et al. (2012)

The MIPS Local Galaxies program compiles the Spitzer MIPS observations of all available galaxies in several Herschel-SPIRE Local Galaxies Guaranteed Time Programs, including the Very Nearby Galaxies Survey (VNGS), Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS), Herschel Reference Survey (HRS), and Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA239 Dataset

Teplitz et al. (2011)

The Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) aims to unite extremely deep observations from NASA's Great Observatories (Spitzer, Hubble and Chandra), ESA's Herschel and XMM-Newton, and the most powerful ground-based facilities. The aim is to survey the distant universe to the faintest flux limits across the broadest range of wavelengths.

GOODS Spitzer IRS 16 micron observations surveyed 150 square arcminutes in each of the two GOODS fields (North and South), to an average 3 sigma depth of 40 and 65 microJy, respectively. These sources have been cross-correlated with Spitzer, Chandra, and HST measurements in other bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA240 Dataset

GOODS team

The Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) aims to unite extremely deep observations from NASA's Great Observatories (Spitzer, Hubble and Chandra), ESA's Herschel and XMM-Newton, and the most powerful ground-based facilities. The aim is to survey the distant universe to the faintest flux limits across the broadest range of wavelengths.

This catalog provides a list of sources for the MIPS 24 micron imaging of the GOODS-N field. It is limited to flux densities greater than 80 microJy, where the source extraction is highly complete and reliable.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA241 Dataset

Teplitz et al. (2011)

The Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) aims to unite extremely deep observations from NASA's Great Observatories (Spitzer, Hubble and Chandra), ESA's Herschel and XMM-Newton, and the most powerful ground-based facilities. The aim is to survey the distant universe to the faintest flux limits across the broadest range of wavelengths.

GOODS Spitzer IRS 16 micron observations surveyed 150 square arcminutes in each of the two GOODS fields (North and South), to an average 3 sigma depth of 40 and 65 microJy, respectively. These sources have been cross-correlated with Spitzer, Chandra, and HST measurements in other bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA242 Dataset

GOODS team

The Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) aims to unite extremely deep observations from NASA's Great Observatories (Spitzer, Hubble and Chandra), ESA's Herschel and XMM-Newton, and the most powerful ground-based facilities. The aim is to survey the distant universe to the faintest flux limits across the broadest range of wavelengths.

This catalog provides a list of sources for the MIPS 24 micron imaging of the GOODS-S field. It is limited to flux densities greater than 80 microJy, where the source extraction is highly complete and reliable.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA243 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The High Reliability OFF-CLOUD Catalog provides the most reliable list of sources in the C2D OFF-CLOUD fields (ChamaeleonII (CHA_II), Lupus (LUP), Ophiuchus (OPH), Perseus (PER) and Serpens (SER)). It is derived from the Full Catalog but requires good signal-to-noise detection in some bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA244 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The Candidate YSO STARS Catalog lists the candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the C2D STARS fields (160 targeted stars). It is derived from the Full Catalog using methodology described in Harvey et al. (2007b).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA245 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The Perseus Transient Sources Catalogs list the transient sources detected above 1.6 mJy in the MIPS observations of the Perseus molecular cloud region.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA246 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The Full CLOUDS Catalog provides the most complete but least reliable list of sources in the C2D CLOUDS fields (ChamaeleonII (CHA_II), Lupus (LUP), Ophiuchus (OPH), Perseus (PER) and Serpens (SER)).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA247 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The Full STARS Catalog provides the most complete but least reliable list of sources in the C2D STARS fields (160 targeted stars).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA248 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The Candidate YSO CORES Catalog lists the candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the C2D CORES fields (82 small cloud cores). It is derived from the Full Catalog using methodology described in Harvey et al. (2007b).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA249 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The Candidate YSO OFF-CLOUD Catalog lists the candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the C2D OFF-CLOUD fields (ChamaeleonII (CHA_II), Lupus (LUP), Ophiuchus (OPH), Perseus (PER) and Serpens (SER)). It is derived from the Full Catalog using methodology described in Harvey et al. (2007b).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA250 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The High Reliability CLOUDS Catalog provides the most reliable list of sources in the C2D CLOUDS fields (ChamaeleonII (CHA_II), Lupus (LUP), Ophiuchus (OPH), Perseus (PER) and Serpens (SER)). It is derived from the Full Catalog but requires good signal-to-noise detection in some bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA251 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The Full CORES Catalog provides the most complete but least reliable list of sources in the C2D CORES fields (82 small cloud cores).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA252 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The Perseus Transient Sources Catalogs list the transient sources detected above 1.6 mJy in the MIPS observations of the Perseus molecular cloud region.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA253 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The Millimeter Sources Catalog lists the sources in the ancillary Bolocam data toward the Ophiuchus (OPH), Perseus (PER) and Serpens (SER) clouds.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA254 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The High Reliability CORES Catalog provides the most reliable list of sources in the C2D CORES fields (82 small cloud cores). It is derived from the Full Catalog but requires good signal-to-noise detection in some bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA255 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The Full OFF-CLOUD Catalog provides the most complete but least reliable list of sources in the C2D OFF-CLOUDS fields (ChamaeleonII (CHA_II), Lupus (LUP), Ophiuchus (OPH), Perseus (PER) and Serpens (SER)).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA256 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The Candidate YSO CLOUDS Catalog lists the candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the C2D CLOUDS fields (ChamaeleonII (CHA_II), Lupus (LUP), Ophiuchus (OPH), Perseus (PER) and Serpens (SER)). It is derived from the Full Catalog using methodology described in Harvey et al. (2007b).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA257 Dataset

C2D team

The Cores to Disks (C2D) Spitzer Legacy Program used all three Spitzer instruments (IRAC, MIPS, and IRS) to observe sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to protoplanetary disks, encompassing a wide range of cloud masses, stellar masses, and star-forming environments. In addition to targeting about 150 known compact cores, it surveyed with IRAC and MIPS (3.6-70 mum) the entire areas of five of the nearest large molecular clouds for new candidate protostars and substellar objects as faint as 0.001 solar luminosities. C2D observed with IRAC and MIPS about 190 systems likely to be in the early stages of planetary system formation (ages up to about 10 Myr), probing the evolution of the circumstellar dust, the raw material for planetary cores.

The High Reliability STARS Catalog provides the most reliable list of sources in the C2D STARS fields (160 targeted stars). It is derived from the Full Catalog but requires good signal-to-noise detection in some bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA258 Dataset

Gutermuth & Heyer (2015)

The MIPSGAL Survey is a Legacy Program of the Spitzer Space Telescope that imaged the 24 and 70 micron emission along the inner disk of the Milky Way (Carey et al. 2009). These mid-infrared bands are sensitive to the thermal emission radiated by interstellar dust grains that reside within a broad range of environments such as the envelopes of evolved stars, circumstellar disks and infalling envelopes surrounding young stellar objects, HII regions, supernova remnants, and the extended domains of dense, interstellar clouds. With its primary 24 micron band, MIPSGAL provides a critical wavelength measurement, which links the near infrared data from 2MASS and GLIMPSE to the far-infrared/submillimeter information for both point sources and diffuse emission.

The MIPSGAL 24 micron Catalog contains the high reliability subset of MIPSGAL sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA259 Dataset

Gutermuth & Heyer (2015)

The MIPSGAL Survey is a Legacy Program of the Spitzer Space Telescope that imaged the 24 and 70 micron emission along the inner disk of the Milky Way (Carey et al. 2009). These mid-infrared bands are sensitive to the thermal emission radiated by interstellar dust grains that reside within a broad range of environments such as the envelopes of evolved stars, circumstellar disks and infalling envelopes surrounding young stellar objects, HII regions, supernova remnants, and the extended domains of dense, interstellar clouds. With its primary 24 micron band, MIPSGAL provides a critical wavelength measurement, which links the near infrared data from 2MASS and GLIMPSE to the far-infrared/submillimeter information for both point sources and diffuse emission.

The MIPSGAL 24 micron Archive contains the most complete list of MIPSGAL sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA260 Dataset

Scott et al.

The Spitzer/MIPS 24 and 70 μm imaging of an 11.5 square degree region near the South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) has been carried out in order to complement sub-millimeter wavelength observations (250-500 μm) of the same region of sky taken with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope (BLAST), with the goal of better characterizing the nature of sub-millimeter selected galaxies and their role in galaxy evolution. This field has also been extensively mapped at other wavelengths, and will be imaged from 100-500 μm as part of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES).

Candidate extended sources were identified by comparing PRF-fitted fluxes to aperture fluxes at 7.4" and 16" radius (24 and 70 microns, respectively). Sources for which the fluxes disagree (3 sigma) and the corrected aperture flux is higher are considered possible extended sources. These candidates are matched to known objects in NED. Sources requiring an aperture larger than 15" (24 microns) or 36" (70 microns) are measured using aperture photometry on the point source subtracted residual image.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA261 Dataset

Scott et al.

The Spitzer/MIPS 24 and 70 μm imaging of an 11.5 square degree region near the South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) has been carried out in order to complement sub-millimeter wavelength observations (250-500 μm) of the same region of sky taken with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope (BLAST), with the goal of better characterizing the nature of sub-millimeter selected galaxies and their role in galaxy evolution. This field has also been extensively mapped at other wavelengths, and will be imaged from 100-500 μm as part of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES).

Source detection and photometry were performed using the APEX software within the MOPEX package. Source candidates with S/N > 6 and reduced chi-squared values less than or equal to three (93% of the sources) are considered reliable detections. The remaining source candidates were then inspected (see Scott et al. 2010 for details) and false positives were removed from the catalog.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA262 Dataset

Baronchelli et al. (2018)

The Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS Extragalactic survey (SIMES) in the South Ecliptic Pole field (SEP) covers an area of 7.74 sq. deg to a depth of ~5.80 microJy (3sigma) at 3.6 microns and 5.25 microJy at 4.5 microns. The 90% and 50% completeness limits are at 14 and 9 microJy, respectively. The multiwavelength catalog includes the WFI-Rc, MIPS-24 micron, SPIRE 250, 350 and 500 micron fluxes of the counterparts that were identified by searching for the closest neighbor.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA263 Dataset

Scott et al.

The Spitzer/MIPS 24 and 70 μm imaging of an 11.5 square degree region near the South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) has been carried out in order to complement sub-millimeter wavelength observations (250-500 μm) of the same region of sky taken with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope (BLAST), with the goal of better characterizing the nature of sub-millimeter selected galaxies and their role in galaxy evolution. This field has also been extensively mapped at other wavelengths, and will be imaged from 100-500 μm as part of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES).

Source detection and photometry were performed using the APEX software within the MOPEX package. Source candidates with S/N > 5 and reduced chi-squared values less than or equal to three (97% of the sources) are considered reliable detections. The remaining source candidates were then inspected (see Scott et al. 2010 for details) and false positives were removed from the catalog. Some sources in the catalog are flagged as possible false positives; see the status field.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA264 Dataset

SIMPLE team

The Spitzer IRAC/MUSYC Public Legacy Survey in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (SIMPLE) consists of deep IRAC observations (several hours per pointing) covering the 0.5 x 0.5 deg area surrounding the GOODS CDF-South. This low-background region of the sky has by far the best supporting data of any cosmological survey field of comparable area, with deep observations from the X-rays to the thermal infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA265 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA266 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA267 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This catalog presents the SDSS and MIPS photometry from Papovich et al. (2006).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA268 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA269 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This catalog presents the SDSS spectroscopic information from Papovich et al. (2006).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA270 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA271 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA272 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This catalog allows advanced queries of the MMT/Hectospec ancillary spectra described in Papovich et al. (2006).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA273 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA274 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA275 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA276 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA277 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This catalog presents line ratio and extinction measurements from the WIYN/Hydra spectra described in Marleau et al. (2007).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA278 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA279 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA280 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA281 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA282 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA283 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This catalog presents line strength and equivalent width measurements from the WIYN/Hydra spectra described in Marleau et al. (2007).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA284 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This catalog presents data on the WIYN/Hydra spectra described in Marleau et al. (2007).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA285 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA286 Dataset

FLS team

The Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930, with extensive ancillary data from ground-based optical and radio telescopes. As one of the first observations made with Spitzer after the completion of Science Verification at the end of 2003 November, the aim of this 67 hr survey was to characterize the extragalactic source populations observed with Spitzer down to sub-millijansky levels in the mid-infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA287 Dataset

Rafiei Ravandi et al. (2016)

Spitzer IRAC Observations of the Extended Disk and Halo of M31 (M31 IRAC) covers the major and minor axes of M31 with total lengths of 6.6 and 4.4 degrees, respectively. The M31 IRAC Catalog includes 426,529 sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA288 Dataset

Cygnus-X team

The Cygnus-X project is a Cycle 4 Legacy program (PID 40184) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The survey imaged a ~24 square degree region centered near 20:30:25, +40:00 (J2000) with IRAC and the MIPS 24 micron band.

Two catalog data products are provided, the Catalog and the Archive. The Catalog has more stringent constraints on S/N and detections in multiple bands, so in principle it is more reliable than the Archive. However, the lists differ mostly in the sources included at the faint end, including more sources that satisfy the S/N criterion in both IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 m bands. A detailed comparison between the Archive sources and the mosaics indicates that most of the sources are likely real, but a conservative estimate of the S/N has pushed them slightly outside of the requirement for inclusion in the Catalog.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA289 Dataset

Cygnus-X team

The Cygnus-X project is a Cycle 4 Legacy program (PID 40184) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The survey imaged a ~24 square degree region centered near 20:30:25, +40:00 (J2000) with IRAC and the MIPS 24 micron band.

Two catalog data products are provided, the Catalog and the Archive. The Catalog has more stringent constraints on S/N and detections in multiple bands, so in principle it is more reliable than the Archive. However, the lists differ mostly in the sources included at the faint end, including more sources that satisfy the S/N criterion in both IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 m bands. A detailed comparison between the Archive sources and the mosaics indicates that most of the sources are likely real, but a conservative estimate of the S/N has pushed them slightly outside of the requirement for inclusion in the Catalog.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA290 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, a source must be detected in at least 60% of the observations at that wavelength, at least 32% of the observations in an adjacent band (the confirming band), and the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 7] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. The 2MASS K_s band is counted as a detection. For a typical source, extracted from 2x12 sec frametime images, the minimum detection criterion amounts to being detected twice in one band (usually band 1 or 2) and once in an adjacent band (sometimes referred to as the 2+1 criterion). For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" are excluded. For more details, see Section 3.3 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA291 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

To be included in each single epoch catalog, each 24 um source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value >0.89. This removed approximately 2/3 of the entries in the single epoch source lists. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. This requirement removed a small number of sources (70). Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise (S/N) values >5. The S/N used was that estimated from the StarFinder code using the mosaic uncertainty image added in quadrature with an 0.6% error due to the background subtraction. This removed 700 sources. The final Epoch 1 catalog likely has a few remaining unreliable sources, estimated to be at less than the 1% level. The Full List contains ALL sources extracted from the MIPS 24 um mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. For more details, see Section 4.1 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA292 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

To be included in each single epoch catalog, each 24 um source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value >0.89. This removed approximately 2/3 of the entries in the single epoch source lists. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. This requirement removed a small number of sources (70). Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise (S/N) values >5. The S/N used was that estimated from the StarFinder code using the mosaic uncertainty image added in quadrature with an 0.6% error due to the background subtraction. This removed 700 sources. The final Epoch 1 catalog likely has a few remaining unreliable sources, estimated to be at less than the 1% level. The Full List contains ALL sources extracted from the MIPS 24 um mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. For more details, see Section 4.1 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA293 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, a source must be detected in at least 60% of the observations at that wavelength, at least 32% of the observations in an adjacent band (the confirming band), and the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 7] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. The 2MASS K_s band is counted as a detection. For a typical source, extracted from 2x12 sec frametime images, the minimum detection criterion amounts to being detected twice in one band (usually band 1 or 2) and once in an adjacent band (sometimes referred to as the 2+1 criterion). For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" are excluded. For more details, see Section 3.3 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA294 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, a source must be detected in at least 60% of the observations at that wavelength, at least 32% of the observations in an adjacent band (the confirming band), and the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 7] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. The 2MASS K_s band is counted as a detection. For a typical source, extracted from 2x12 sec frametime images, the minimum detection criterion amounts to being detected twice in one band (usually band 1 or 2) and once in an adjacent band (sometimes referred to as the 2+1 criterion). For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" are excluded. For more details, see Section 3.3 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA295 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

To be included in each single epoch catalog, each 24 um source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value >0.89. This removed approximately 2/3 of the entries in the single epoch source lists. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. This requirement removed a small number of sources (70). Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise (S/N) values >5. The S/N used was that estimated from the StarFinder code using the mosaic uncertainty image added in quadrature with an 0.6% error due to the background subtraction. This removed 700 sources. The final Epoch 1 catalog likely has a few remaining unreliable sources, estimated to be at less than the 1% level. The Full List contains ALL sources extracted from the MIPS 24 um mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. For more details, see Section 4.1 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA296 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

To be included in each single epoch catalog, each 24 um source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value >0.89. This removed approximately 2/3 of the entries in the single epoch source lists. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. This requirement removed a small number of sources (70). Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise (S/N) values >5. The S/N used was that estimated from the StarFinder code using the mosaic uncertainty image added in quadrature with an 0.6% error due to the background subtraction. This removed 700 sources. The final Epoch 1 catalog likely has a few remaining unreliable sources, estimated to be at less than the 1% level. The Full List contains ALL sources extracted from the MIPS 24 um mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. For more details, see Section 4.1 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA297 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, a source must be detected in at least 60% of the observations at that wavelength, at least 32% of the observations in an adjacent band (the confirming band), and the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 7] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. The 2MASS K_s band is counted as a detection. For a typical source, extracted from 2x12 sec frametime images, the minimum detection criterion amounts to being detected twice in one band (usually band 1 or 2) and once in an adjacent band (sometimes referred to as the 2+1 criterion). For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" are excluded. For more details, see Section 3.3 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA298 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, a source must be detected in at least 60% of the observations at that wavelength, at least 32% of the observations in an adjacent band (the confirming band), and the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 7] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. The 2MASS K_s band is counted as a detection. For a typical source, extracted from 2x12 sec frametime images, the minimum detection criterion amounts to being detected twice in one band (usually band 1 or 2) and once in an adjacent band (sometimes referred to as the 2+1 criterion). For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" are excluded. For more details, see Section 3.3 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA299 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

To be included in each single epoch catalog, each 24 um source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value >0.89. This removed approximately 2/3 of the entries in the single epoch source lists. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. This requirement removed a small number of sources (70). Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise (S/N) values >5. The S/N used was that estimated from the StarFinder code using the mosaic uncertainty image added in quadrature with an 0.6% error due to the background subtraction. This removed 700 sources. The final Epoch 1 catalog likely has a few remaining unreliable sources, estimated to be at less than the 1% level. The Full List contains ALL sources extracted from the MIPS 24 um mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. For more details, see Section 4.1 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA300 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

To be included in each single epoch catalog, each 24 um source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value >0.89. This removed approximately 2/3 of the entries in the single epoch source lists. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. This requirement removed a small number of sources (70). Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise (S/N) values >5. The S/N used was that estimated from the StarFinder code using the mosaic uncertainty image added in quadrature with an 0.6% error due to the background subtraction. This removed 700 sources. The final Epoch 1 catalog likely has a few remaining unreliable sources, estimated to be at less than the 1% level. The Full List contains ALL sources extracted from the MIPS 24 um mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. For more details, see Section 4.1 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA301 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, a source must be detected in at least 60% of the observations at that wavelength, at least 32% of the observations in an adjacent band (the confirming band), and the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 7] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. The 2MASS K_s band is counted as a detection. For a typical source, extracted from 2x12 sec frametime images, the minimum detection criterion amounts to being detected twice in one band (usually band 1 or 2) and once in an adjacent band (sometimes referred to as the 2+1 criterion). For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" are excluded. For more details, see Section 3.3 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA302 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

To be included in each single epoch catalog, each 24 um source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value >0.89. This removed approximately 2/3 of the entries in the single epoch source lists. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. This requirement removed a small number of sources (70). Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise (S/N) values >5. The S/N used was that estimated from the StarFinder code using the mosaic uncertainty image added in quadrature with an 0.6% error due to the background subtraction. This removed 700 sources. The final Epoch 1 catalog likely has a few remaining unreliable sources, estimated to be at less than the 1% level. The Full List contains ALL sources extracted from the MIPS 24 um mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. For more details, see Section 4.1 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA303 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The SAGE-SMC pro ject is a Cycle 4 legacy program on the Spitzer Space Telescope, entitled, SAGE-SMC: Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Disrupted, Low-Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, with Karl Gordon (STScI) as the PI. The project overview and initial results are described in a paper by Gordon et al. (2010, in prep). The SMC was mapped at two different epochs dubbed Epochs 1 and 2 separated by 3 (IRAC) and 9 (MIPS) months, as this provides a 90-degree roll angle in the orientation of the detectors, which optimally removes the striping artifacts in MIPS and artifacts along columns and rows in the IRAC image data. In addition, these two epochs are useful constraints of source variability expected for evolved stars and some young stellar ob jects (YSOs). The IRAC and MIPS observations from the S3MC pathfinder survey of the inner 3 sq. deg. of the SMC (PI: Bolatto, referred to as Epoch 0) have been reduced using the same software.

To be included in each single epoch catalog, each 24 um source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value >0.89. This removed approximately 2/3 of the entries in the single epoch source lists. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. This requirement removed a small number of sources (70). Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise (S/N) values >5. The S/N used was that estimated from the StarFinder code using the mosaic uncertainty image added in quadrature with an 0.6% error due to the background subtraction. This removed 700 sources. The final Epoch 1 catalog likely has a few remaining unreliable sources, estimated to be at less than the 1% level. The Full List contains ALL sources extracted from the MIPS 24 um mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. For more details, see Section 4.1 of the SAGE-SMC Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA304 Dataset

CSI2264 team

The CSI 2264 project performed photometric monitoring of young NGC 2264 cluster members using the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC; Fazio et al. 2004) and the Convection, Rotation and Planetary Transits satellite (CoRoT; Baglin et al. 2006) simultaneously. Thirteen other telescopes monitored the region at different times concurrently with (or closely in time to) the primary Spitzer and CoRoT joint campaign. The CSI 2264 project is described in detail in Cody et al. (2014).

This table contains Spitzer light curves for objects that are very likely NGC 2264 members (using the criteria described in Cody et al. 2014), and that have at least 15 good data points in one of the IRAC bands. Only data from Warm Spitzer cycle 8 program 80040 (Dec. 2011- Jan. 2012) are provided. There are many rows for each object, because each object has many epochs of data. Columns 11, 12, and 13 (the IRAC excess flag and the light curve types) are duplications of information found in our first table, but are repeated here to make it easy for users to, e.g., pull out all of the light curves of a specific type.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA305 Dataset

CSI2264 team

The CSI 2264 project performed photometric monitoring of young NGC 2264 cluster members using the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC; Fazio et al. 2004) and the Convection, Rotation and Planetary Transits satellite (CoRoT; Baglin et al. 2006) simultaneously. Thirteen other telescopes monitored the region at different times concurrently with (or closely in time to) the primary Spitzer and CoRoT joint campaign. The CSI 2264 project is described in detail in Cody et al. (2014).

This table contains CoRoT light curves for objects that are very likely NGC 2264 members (using the criteria described in Cody et al. 2014). There are many rows for each object, because each object has many epochs of data. There are 9 columns in this table, as follows. Columns 7, 8, and 9 (the IRAC excess flag and the light curve types) are duplications of information found in the Object Table, but are repeated here to make it easy for users to, e.g., pull out all of the light curves of a specific type.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA306 Dataset

CSI2264 team

The CSI 2264 project performed photometric monitoring of young NGC 2264 cluster members using the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC; Fazio et al. 2004) and the Convection, Rotation and Planetary Transits satellite (CoRoT; Baglin et al. 2006) simultaneously. Thirteen other telescopes monitored the region at different times concurrently with (or closely in time to) the primary Spitzer and CoRoT joint campaign. The CSI 2264 project is described in detail in Cody et al. (2014).

The Object Table contains one line per object, and covers all of the objects in the greater NGC 2264 region, not just those that have light curves or are members.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA307 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

The main SWIRE catalogs for 24 micron data are the Optical-IRAC-MIPS24 bandmerged catalogs. The bandmerged catalogs require a detection in the shortest IRAC band (3.6 microns). The SWIRE project has produced single-band 24 micron catalogs to cover regions that lie outside the IRAC images, and to include sources that for some reason were not associated with a 3.6 micron detection.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA308 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

The main SWIRE catalogs for 24 micron data are the Optical-IRAC-MIPS24 bandmerged catalogs. The bandmerged catalogs require a detection in the shortest IRAC band (3.6 microns). The SWIRE project has produced single-band 24 micron catalogs to cover regions that lie outside the IRAC images, and to include sources that for some reason were not associated with a 3.6 micron detection.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA309 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

The SWIRE Lockman Hole ISOCAM Deep Field Catalog presents MIPS 24 micron measurements of the sources detected at 14.3 micron in the Lockman Hole Deep Survey by ISO. For more details on the Lockman Hole ISOCAM Deep Survey, see Rodighiero et al. (2004).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA310 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA311 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

The main SWIRE catalogs for 24 micron data are the Optical-IRAC-MIPS24 bandmerged catalogs. The bandmerged catalogs require a detection in the shortest IRAC band (3.6 microns). The SWIRE project has produced single-band 24 micron catalogs to cover regions that lie outside the IRAC images, and to include sources that for some reason were not associated with a 3.6 micron detection.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA312 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

The main SWIRE catalogs for 24 micron data are the Optical-IRAC-MIPS24 bandmerged catalogs. The bandmerged catalogs require a detection in the shortest IRAC band (3.6 microns). The SWIRE project has produced single-band 24 micron catalogs to cover regions that lie outside the IRAC images, and to include sources that for some reason were not associated with a 3.6 micron detection.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA313 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE) is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA314 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA315 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA316 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

The main SWIRE catalogs for 24 micron data are the Optical-IRAC-MIPS24 bandmerged catalogs. The bandmerged catalogs require a detection in the shortest IRAC band (3.6 microns). The SWIRE project has produced single-band 24 micron catalogs to cover regions that lie outside the IRAC images, and to include sources that for some reason were not associated with a 3.6 micron detection.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA317 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

The main SWIRE catalogs for 24 micron data are the Optical-IRAC-MIPS24 bandmerged catalogs. The bandmerged catalogs require a detection in the shortest IRAC band (3.6 microns). The SWIRE project has produced single-band 24 micron catalogs to cover regions that lie outside the IRAC images, and to include sources that for some reason were not associated with a 3.6 micron detection.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA318 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA319 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

The main SWIRE catalogs for 24 micron data are the Optical-IRAC-MIPS24 bandmerged catalogs. The bandmerged catalogs require a detection in the shortest IRAC band (3.6 microns). The SWIRE project has produced single-band 24 micron catalogs to cover regions that lie outside the IRAC images, and to include sources that for some reason were not associated with a 3.6 micron detection.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA320 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

The main SWIRE catalogs for 24 micron data are the Optical-IRAC-MIPS24 bandmerged catalogs. The bandmerged catalogs require a detection in the shortest IRAC band (3.6 microns). The SWIRE project has produced single-band 24 micron catalogs to cover regions that lie outside the IRAC images, and to include sources that for some reason were not associated with a 3.6 micron detection.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA321 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA322 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA323 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

The main SWIRE catalogs for 24 micron data are the Optical-IRAC-MIPS24 bandmerged catalogs. The bandmerged catalogs require a detection in the shortest IRAC band (3.6 microns). The SWIRE project has produced single-band 24 micron catalogs to cover regions that lie outside the IRAC images, and to include sources that for some reason were not associated with a 3.6 micron detection.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA324 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

The SWIRE Lockman Hole ISOCAM Deep Field Catalog presents MIPS 24 micron measurements of the sources detected at 14.3 micron in the Lockman Hole Shallow Survey by ISO. For more details on the Lockman Hole ISOCAM Shallow Survey, see Fadda et al. (2004).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA325 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA326 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA327 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA328 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

The main SWIRE catalogs for 24 micron data are the Optical-IRAC-MIPS24 bandmerged catalogs. The bandmerged catalogs require a detection in the shortest IRAC band (3.6 microns). The SWIRE project has produced single-band 24 micron catalogs to cover regions that lie outside the IRAC images, and to include sources that for some reason were not associated with a 3.6 micron detection.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA329 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA330 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA331 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA332 Dataset

SWIRE team

The Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest Spitzer Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE surveys 6 high-latitude fields, totaling ~50 sq. deg. in all 7 Spitzer bands: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns with IRAC and 24, 70, and 160 microns with MIPS (Lonsdale et al. 2003). The SWIRE Legacy Extragalactic Source Catalogs will eventually contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, from those dominated by the light of stellar populations detected primarily by IRAC, to starbursts, ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and AGN detected also by MIPS.

The main SWIRE catalogs for 24 micron data are the Optical-IRAC-MIPS24 bandmerged catalogs. The bandmerged catalogs require a detection in the shortest IRAC band (3.6 microns). The SWIRE project has produced single-band 24 micron catalogs to cover regions that lie outside the IRAC images, and to include sources that for some reason were not associated with a 3.6 micron detection.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA333 Dataset

SSDF team

The Spitzer-South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) is a wide-area survey using IRAC to cover 94 square degrees of extragalactic sky, making it the largest IRAC survey completed to date outside the Milky Way midplane. The SSDF is centered at 23:30,-55:00, in a region that combines observations spanning a broad wavelength range from numerous facilities. These include millimeter imaging from the South Pole Telescope, far-infrared observations from Herschel/SPIRE, X-ray observations from the XMM XXL survey, near-infrared observations from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey, and radio-wavelength imaging from the Australia Telescope Compact Array, in a panchromatic project designed to address major outstanding questions surrounding galaxy clusters and the baryon budget.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA334 Dataset

SSDF team

The Spitzer-South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) is a wide-area survey using IRAC to cover 94 square degrees of extragalactic sky, making it the largest IRAC survey completed to date outside the Milky Way midplane. The SSDF is centered at 23:30,-55:00, in a region that combines observations spanning a broad wavelength range from numerous facilities. These include millimeter imaging from the South Pole Telescope, far-infrared observations from Herschel/SPIRE, X-ray observations from the XMM XXL survey, near-infrared observations from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey, and radio-wavelength imaging from the Australia Telescope Compact Array, in a panchromatic project designed to address major outstanding questions surrounding galaxy clusters and the baryon budget.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA335 Dataset

S4G team

The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) is a volume-, magnitude-, and size-limited survey of over 2300 nearby galaxies at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. This is an extremely deep survey reaching an unprecedented 1 sigma surface brightness limit of μ3.6(AB) = 27 mag arcsec-2. This translates to a stellar surface density of << 1 Msun pc-2.

The S4G Catalog provides photometry and model parameters derived from the IRAC images, as well as a link to the summary and data access page for each galaxy and a variety of quantities taken from previously published work.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA336 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

To be included in a Catalog, each source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value 0.89. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. There are a small number of sources with 24 um magnitudes between 4 and 8 which have unusually low uncertainties (i.e., high S/N). The origin of these sources is under investigation and seems to be related to edge effects in the AORs. In the meantime, these sources were removed from the 24 um catalogs. Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise values >5. The final catalogs likely have a few remaining unreliable sources, but we estimate this to be at the less than 1% error.

The Full Lists contain ALL the sources extracted from the mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. The full list may be useful to search for the potential counterparts to known sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA337 Dataset

Riebel et al. (2015)

SAGE-Var is a follow-up to the SAGE and SAGE-SMC Legacy programs. The SAGE-Var program obtained 4 epochs of photometry at 3.6 and 4.5 microns covering the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the central region of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in order to probe the variability of extremely red sources missed by variability surveys conducted at shorter wavelengths, and to provide additional epochs of observation for known variables. The 6 total epochs of observations probe infrared variability on 15 different timescales ranging from 20 days to 5 years.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA338 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, the S/N must be greater than [6, 6, 6, 10] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um] for the flux to appear in the corresponding wavelength column. Whereas for the archive, the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 5] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" radius are excluded. The difference in criteria for the catalog and archive creation is more complex and described in Section 5.2 of the SAGE Data Delivery Document.

This catalog contains Epoch 1 only and Epoch 2 only sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA339 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, the S/N must be greater than [6, 6, 6, 10] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um] for the flux to appear in the corresponding wavelength column. Whereas for the archive, the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 5] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" radius are excluded. The difference in criteria for the catalog and archive creation is more complex and described in Section 5.2 of the SAGE Data Delivery Document.

The offset position is a calibration field at RA=82.25d Dec=-45.95d.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA340 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

To be included in a Catalog, each source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value 0.89. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. There are a small number of sources with 24 um magnitudes between 4 and 8 which have unusually low uncertainties (i.e., high S/N). The origin of these sources is under investigation and seems to be related to edge effects in the AORs. In the meantime, these sources were removed from the 24 um catalogs. Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise values >5. The final catalogs likely have a few remaining unreliable sources, but we estimate this to be at the less than 1% error.

The Full Lists contain ALL the sources extracted from the mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. The full list may be useful to search for the potential counterparts to known sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA341 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, the S/N must be greater than [6, 6, 6, 10] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um] for the flux to appear in the corresponding wavelength column. Whereas for the archive, the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 5] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" radius are excluded. The difference in criteria for the catalog and archive creation is more complex and described in Section 5.2 of the SAGE Data Delivery Document.

This catalog contains multi-epoch IRAC data for all the sources detected in both epochs of the IRAC Catalog. Averaged fluxes and the variability indices are provided for each IRAC band.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA342 Dataset

Riebel et al. (2015)

SAGE-Var is a follow-up to the SAGE and SAGE-SMC Legacy programs. The SAGE-Var program obtained 4 epochs of photometry at 3.6 and 4.5 microns covering the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the central region of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in order to probe the variability of extremely red sources missed by variability surveys conducted at shorter wavelengths, and to provide additional epochs of observation for known variables. The 6 total epochs of observations probe infrared variability on 15 different timescales ranging from 20 days to 5 years.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA343 Dataset

Riebel et al. (2015)

SAGE-Var is a follow-up to the SAGE and SAGE-SMC Legacy programs. The SAGE-Var program obtained 4 epochs of photometry at 3.6 and 4.5 microns covering the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the central region of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in order to probe the variability of extremely red sources missed by variability surveys conducted at shorter wavelengths, and to provide additional epochs of observation for known variables. The 6 total epochs of observations probe infrared variability on 15 different timescales ranging from 20 days to 5 years.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA344 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, the S/N must be greater than [6, 6, 6, 10] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um] for the flux to appear in the corresponding wavelength column. Whereas for the archive, the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 5] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" radius are excluded. The difference in criteria for the catalog and archive creation is more complex and described in Section 5.2 of the SAGE Data Delivery Document.

This archive contains Epoch 1 only and Epoch 2 only sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA345 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, the S/N must be greater than [6, 6, 6, 10] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um] for the flux to appear in the corresponding wavelength column. Whereas for the archive, the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 5] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" radius are excluded. The difference in criteria for the catalog and archive creation is more complex and described in Section 5.2 of the SAGE Data Delivery Document.

This archive contains multi-epoch IRAC data for all the sources detected in both epochs of the IRAC Archive. Averaged fluxes and the variability indices are provided for each IRAC band.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA346 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

To be included in a Catalog, each source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value 0.89. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. There are a small number of sources with 24 um magnitudes between 4 and 8 which have unusually low uncertainties (i.e., high S/N). The origin of these sources is under investigation and seems to be related to edge effects in the AORs. In the meantime, these sources were removed from the 24 um catalogs. Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise values >5. The final catalogs likely have a few remaining unreliable sources, but we estimate this to be at the less than 1% error.

The Full Lists contain ALL the sources extracted from the mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. The full list may be useful to search for the potential counterparts to known sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA347 Dataset

Riebel et al. (2015)

SAGE-Var is a follow-up to the SAGE and SAGE-SMC Legacy programs. The SAGE-Var program obtained 4 epochs of photometry at 3.6 and 4.5 microns covering the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the central region of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in order to probe the variability of extremely red sources missed by variability surveys conducted at shorter wavelengths, and to provide additional epochs of observation for known variables. The 6 total epochs of observations probe infrared variability on 15 different timescales ranging from 20 days to 5 years.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA348 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, the S/N must be greater than [6, 6, 6, 10] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um] for the flux to appear in the corresponding wavelength column. Whereas for the archive, the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 5] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" radius are excluded. The difference in criteria for the catalog and archive creation is more complex and described in Section 5.2 of the SAGE Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA349 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

To be included in a Catalog, each source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value 0.89. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. There are a small number of sources with 24 um magnitudes between 4 and 8 which have unusually low uncertainties (i.e., high S/N). The origin of these sources is under investigation and seems to be related to edge effects in the AORs. In the meantime, these sources were removed from the 24 um catalogs. Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise values >5. The final catalogs likely have a few remaining unreliable sources, but we estimate this to be at the less than 1% error.

The Full Lists contain ALL the sources extracted from the mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. The full list may be useful to search for the potential counterparts to known sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA350 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

To be included in a Catalog, each source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value 0.89. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. There are a small number of sources with 24 um magnitudes between 4 and 8 which have unusually low uncertainties (i.e., high S/N). The origin of these sources is under investigation and seems to be related to edge effects in the AORs. In the meantime, these sources were removed from the 24 um catalogs. Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise values >5. The final catalogs likely have a few remaining unreliable sources, but we estimate this to be at the less than 1% error.

The Full Lists contain ALL the sources extracted from the mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. The full list may be useful to search for the potential counterparts to known sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA351 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, the S/N must be greater than [6, 6, 6, 10] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um] for the flux to appear in the corresponding wavelength column. Whereas for the archive, the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 5] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" radius are excluded. The difference in criteria for the catalog and archive creation is more complex and described in Section 5.2 of the SAGE Data Delivery Document.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA352 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

In comparison to the catalog, the archive has more source fluxes (fewer nulled wavelengths) and some more sources but these additions have more uncertainty associated with them. For the catalog, the S/N must be greater than [6, 6, 6, 10] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um] for the flux to appear in the corresponding wavelength column. Whereas for the archive, the S/N must be greater than [5, 5, 5, 5] for IRAC bands [3.6um], [4.5um], [5.8um] and [8.0um]. For the catalog, sources with neighbors within a 2" radius are excluded (culled). For the archive, sources within a 0.5" radius are excluded. The difference in criteria for the catalog and archive creation is more complex and described in Section 5.2 of the SAGE Data Delivery Document.

The offset position is a calibration field at RA=82.25d Dec=-45.95d.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA353 Dataset

SAGE team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud Legacy Project Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) traces the life cycle of observable matter that drives the evolution of a galaxy's appearance. SAGE has revealed over 6 million sources including ~150,000 evolved stars, ~50,000 young stellar objects and the diffuse interstellar medium with column densities > 1.2×1021 cm -2. The data will provide fundamental insights into the physical processes of the interstellar medium, the formation of new stars and the injection of mass by evolved stars and their relationships on the galaxy-wide scale of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

To be included in a Catalog, each source has to meet a number of criteria. The source had to be nearly point like with a correlation value 0.89. In regions where there is a significant structure in the surrounding region (identified as having a sigma > 0.25 in a 120" width square box), the source had to have a correlation value >0.91. There are a small number of sources with 24 um magnitudes between 4 and 8 which have unusually low uncertainties (i.e., high S/N). The origin of these sources is under investigation and seems to be related to edge effects in the AORs. In the meantime, these sources were removed from the 24 um catalogs. Finally, all sources had to have signal-to-noise values >5. The final catalogs likely have a few remaining unreliable sources, but we estimate this to be at the less than 1% error.

The Full Lists contain ALL the sources extracted from the mosaics, thus a user should be aware that it contains spurious sources. The full list may be useful to search for the potential counterparts to known sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA354 Dataset

SAFIRES team

The Spitzer Archival FIR Extragalactic Survey (SAFIRES) is an offshoot of the Spitzer Space Telescope Enhanced Imaging Products (SEIP). SAFIRES applies the SEIP project's methods to the remaining two MIPS bands, located at far-infrared wavelengths of 70 and 160 microns. Due to the complexity of far-infrared observations, these bands require an expansion of SEIP's standard pipeline through the addition of reprocessing tools. These additional steps are required to remove obvious artifacts before extracting useful measurements. As a result, these bands were not included in the SEIP project, but were later funded through an additional NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program (ADAP) grant. To ensure high reliability, the SAFIRES sample includes no fields near the Galactic disk; these observations comprised more than half of the area observed by Spitzer, but the practical drawbacks of Galactic contamination would inhibit the ability to maintain the level of reliability desired in the SAFIRES products. As with SEIP, the SAFIRES source lists contains no extended sources. The remaining sample comprises nearly 1132 fields spanning almost 180 square degrees of sky.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA355 Dataset

SAFIRES team

The Spitzer Archival FIR Extragalactic Survey (SAFIRES) is an offshoot of the Spitzer Space Telescope Enhanced Imaging Products (SEIP). SAFIRES applies the SEIP project's methods to the remaining two MIPS bands, located at far-infrared wavelengths of 70 and 160 microns. Due to the complexity of far-infrared observations, these bands require an expansion of SEIP's standard pipeline through the addition of reprocessing tools. These additional steps are required to remove obvious artifacts before extracting useful measurements. As a result, these bands were not included in the SEIP project, but were later funded through an additional NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program (ADAP) grant. To ensure high reliability, the SAFIRES sample includes no fields near the Galactic disk; these observations comprised more than half of the area observed by Spitzer, but the practical drawbacks of Galactic contamination would inhibit the ability to maintain the level of reliability desired in the SAFIRES products. As with SEIP, the SAFIRES source lists contains no extended sources. The remaining sample comprises nearly 1132 fields spanning almost 180 square degrees of sky.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA356 Dataset

CLASH team

The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program (PI: Marc Postman) completed its Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multiwavelength obsrvations of 25 massive galaxy clusters in 2013 (Postman et al. 2012 describes the full survey). The full HST dataset and associated catalogs and gravitational lens models are available at MAST. A series or programs with Spitzer have covered all CLASH galaxy clusters with IRAC Channels 1 and 2. Several of the targets include Channels 3 and 4 data.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA357 Dataset

CLASH team

The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program (PI: Marc Postman) completed its Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multiwavelength obsrvations of 25 massive galaxy clusters in 2013 (Postman et al. 2012 describes the full survey). The full HST dataset and associated catalogs and gravitational lens models are available at MAST. A series or programs with Spitzer have covered all CLASH galaxy clusters with IRAC Channels 1 and 2. Several of the targets include Channels 3 and 4 data.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA358 Dataset

CLASH team

The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program (PI: Marc Postman) completed its Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multiwavelength obsrvations of 25 massive galaxy clusters in 2013 (Postman et al. 2012 describes the full survey). The full HST dataset and associated catalogs and gravitational lens models are available at MAST. A series or programs with Spitzer have covered all CLASH galaxy clusters with IRAC Channels 1 and 2. Several of the targets include Channels 3 and 4 data.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA359 Dataset

CLASH team

The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program (PI: Marc Postman) completed its Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multiwavelength obsrvations of 25 massive galaxy clusters in 2013 (Postman et al. 2012 describes the full survey). The full HST dataset and associated catalogs and gravitational lens models are available at MAST. A series or programs with Spitzer have covered all CLASH galaxy clusters with IRAC Channels 1 and 2. Several of the targets include Channels 3 and 4 data.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA360 Dataset

SSC/IRSA

The Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) have released a set of Enhanced Imaging Products from the Spitzer Heritage Archive. These include enhanced mosaic images created from multiple AORs where appropriate and a source list (SL) of photometry for compact sources. The enhanced imaging products include data from the four channels of IRAC (3-8 microns) and the 24 micron channel of MIPS.

The Source List was designed to prioritize reliability over completeness. In order to make the Source List reliable, many sources were rejected. Therefore, it is not complete at any flux density. At bright flux densities, nearby galaxies may be rejected for being too extended, or for being too close to a neighboring galaxy. At faint flux densities, sources will be missing because they do not meet the signal-to-noise cut. Although the Source List is useful for many science projects, users who require high levels of completeness are encouraged to use caution. If you are interested in a source that does not appear in the Source List, you should first inspect the Coverage Table to ensure that the data exists, and then consider measuring the photometry on the Super Mosaics yourself.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA361 Dataset

SSC/IRSA

The Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) have released a set of Enhanced Imaging Products from the Spitzer Heritage Archive. These include enhanced mosaic images created from multiple AORs where appropriate and a source list (SL) of photometry for compact sources. The enhanced imaging products include data from the four channels of IRAC (3-8 microns) and the 24 micron channel of MIPS.

The Source List was designed to prioritize reliability over completeness. In order to make the Source List reliable, many sources were rejected. Therefore, it is not complete at any flux density. At bright flux densities, nearby galaxies may be rejected for being too extended, or for being too close to a neighboring galaxy. At faint flux densities, sources will be missing because they do not meet the signal-to-noise cut. Although the Source List is useful for many science projects, users who require high levels of completeness are encouraged to use caution. If you are interested in a source that does not appear in the Source List, you should first inspect the Coverage Table to ensure that the data exists, and then consider measuring the photometry on the Super Mosaics yourself.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA362 Dataset

SSC/IRSA

The Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) have released a set of Enhanced Imaging Products from the Spitzer Heritage Archive. These include enhanced mosaic images created from multiple AORs where appropriate and a source list (SL) of photometry for compact sources. The enhanced imaging products include data from the four channels of IRAC (3-8 microns) and the 24 micron channel of MIPS.

The Traceback Table is designed to allow users to translate between Program ID/AOR number/DCE number (information about pipeline data available from the Spitzer Heritage Archive) and Supermosaic ID/Region ID in the Spitzer Enhanced Imaging Products.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA363 Dataset

Timlin et al. (2016)

The Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES) is a large-area survey of 115 sq. degrees in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field. SpIES achieves 5 sigma depths of 6.13 microJy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 microJy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, respectively.

The 3.6 micron catalog contains the 6.1 million sources that are only detected at 3.6 microns, the 4.5 micron catalog contains the 6.4 million sources that are only detected at 4.5 microns, and the Dual-band catalog contains the 5.4 million sources that are detected in both bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA364 Dataset

Timlin et al. (2016)

The Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES) is a large-area survey of 115 sq. degrees in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field. SpIES achieves 5 sigma depths of 6.13 microJy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 microJy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, respectively.

The 3.6 micron catalog contains the 6.1 million sources that are only detected at 3.6 microns, the 4.5 micron catalog contains the 6.4 million sources that are only detected at 4.5 microns, and the Dual-band catalog contains the 5.4 million sources that are detected in both bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA365 Dataset

Timlin et al. (2016)

The Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES) is a large-area survey of 115 sq. degrees in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field. SpIES achieves 5 sigma depths of 6.13 microJy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 microJy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, respectively.

The 3.6 micron catalog contains the 6.1 million sources that are only detected at 3.6 microns, the 4.5 micron catalog contains the 6.4 million sources that are only detected at 4.5 microns, and the Dual-band catalog contains the 5.4 million sources that are detected in both bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA366 Dataset

SpUDS team

Spitzer Public Legacy Survey of the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (SpUDS) is a survey of the ~1 square degree UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS). The survey consists of deep IRAC and 24 micron MIPS observations. The UDS is the largest deep near-infrared (JHK) survey in existence, and the first capable of sampling representative cosmological volumes (100x100 Mpc) out to the highest redshifts (z>6).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA367 Dataset

SpUDS team

Spitzer Public Legacy Survey of the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (SpUDS) is a survey of the ~1 square degree UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS). The survey consists of deep IRAC and 24 micron MIPS observations. The UDS is the largest deep near-infrared (JHK) survey in existence, and the first capable of sampling representative cosmological volumes (100x100 Mpc) out to the highest redshifts (z>6).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA368 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA369 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA370 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA371 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA372 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The SDWFS Light Curve Catalog presents the 3.6 and 4.5 micron magnitudes for each SDWFS source in each of the four epochs. For more details see Kozlowski et al. (2010).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA373 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA374 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA375 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA376 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA377 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA378 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA379 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The SDWFS Variability Catalog presents variability information for all SDWFS sources with a 5-sigma detection at 3.6 microns. For more details, see Kozlowski et al. (2010).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA380 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA381 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA382 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA383 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA384 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA385 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA386 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA387 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA388 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA389 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of 10 square degrees in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Spitzer Cycle 4 Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit - for the first time - the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z ~ 3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS data sets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z ~ 1.5.

The delivery consists of four band-matched catalogs for each of the four epochs and for the total SDWFS coadd data, a total of 20 catalogs. Vega magnitudes are reported for each IRAC band: 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns. Each source was measured three ways: 4 arcsec diameter aperture, 6 arcsec diameter aperture, and Kron radius aperture (MAG_AUTO in SExtractor). Source coordinates correspond to 2MASS catalog positions to within 0.2 arcsec. The tabulated uncertainties are twice the SExtractor (statistical only) uncertainties as an attempt to account for systematic uncertainties.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA390 Dataset

Papovich et al. (2016)

The Spitzer/HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey covers ~24 sq. deg at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. The survey area falls within the footprints of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey "Stripe 82" region, the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX), and the Dark Energy Survey. The images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1 microJy at both 3.6 and 4.5 microns (1#, for R = 2" circular apertures).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA391 Dataset

Papovich et al. (2016)

The Spitzer/HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey covers ~24 sq. deg at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. The survey area falls within the footprints of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey "Stripe 82" region, the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX), and the Dark Energy Survey. The images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1 microJy at both 3.6 and 4.5 microns (1#, for R = 2" circular apertures).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA392 Dataset

Papovich et al. (2016)

The Spitzer/HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey covers ~24 sq. deg at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. The survey area falls within the footprints of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey "Stripe 82" region, the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX), and the Dark Energy Survey. The images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1 microJy at both 3.6 and 4.5 microns (1#, for R = 2" circular apertures).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA393 Dataset

Papovich et al. (2016)

The Spitzer/HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey covers ~24 sq. deg at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. The survey area falls within the footprints of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey "Stripe 82" region, the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX), and the Dark Energy Survey. The images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1 microJy at both 3.6 and 4.5 microns (1#, for R = 2" circular apertures).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA394 Dataset

Papovich et al. (2016)

The Spitzer/HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey covers ~24 sq. deg at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. The survey area falls within the footprints of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey "Stripe 82" region, the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX), and the Dark Energy Survey. The images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1 microJy at both 3.6 and 4.5 microns (1#, for R = 2" circular apertures).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA395 Dataset

Ashby et al. (2018)

The Spitzer Matching Survey of the Ultra-VISTA Deep Stripes (SMUVS) consists of deep 3.6 and 4.5 imaging of three Ultra-VISTA near-infrared survey stripes in the COSMOS field. SMUVS reaches point-source sensitivities of about 25.0 AB mag at both 3.6 and 4.5 microns with a significance of 4 sigma, accounting for both survey sensitivity and source confusion. To this limit, the SMUVS catalogs contain a total of ~350,000 sources, each of which is detected significantly in at least one IRAC band. Because of its uniform and high sensitivity, relatively large area coverage, and the wide array of ancillary data available in COSMOS, the SMUVS survey will be useful for a large number of cosmological investigations.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA396 Dataset

FEPS team

The Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS) Spitzer Legacy program was designed to char- acterize the evolution of circumstellar gas and dust around solar- type stars between ages of 3 Myr and 3 Gyr. To achieve these goals, FEPS obtained spectrophotometric observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope for a sample of 328 stars (see Meyer et al. 2006 for a description of the sample). The observing strategy was to measure the spectral energy distribution (SED) between wavelengths of 3.6 and 70 um with IRAC and MIPS photometry, and between 8 and 35 um with low-resolution IRS spectra.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA397 Dataset

Edwards et al. (2010)

The Abell 1763 data set includes images in r', J, H, and Ks obtained using the Palomar 200in telescope, as well as the IRAC and MIPS images from Spitzer. The cluster is covered out to approximately 3 virial radii with deep 24 mum imaging (a 5sigma depth of 0.2 mJy). This same field of ~40' × 40' is covered in all four IRAC bands as well as the longer wavelength MIPS bands (70 and 160 mum). The r' imaging covers ~0.8 deg2 down to 25.5 mag, and overlaps with most of the MIPS field of view. The J, H, and Ks images cover the cluster core and roughly half of the filament galaxies, which extend toward the neighboring cluster, Abell 1770.

Approximately 30% of the 70 micron image is not covered by the 24 micron image (nor the IRAC, MIPS 160 micron, or WIRC fields of view). A separate catalog for these 733 sources is presented here. This catalog was matched against the 2MASS Point Source Catalog but NIR magnitudes are not included as only ~7% of the sources have 2MASS associations.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA398 Dataset

Edwards et al. (2010)

The Abell 1763 data set includes images in r', J, H, and Ks obtained using the Palomar 200in telescope, as well as the IRAC and MIPS images from Spitzer. The cluster is covered out to approximately 3 virial radii with deep 24 mum imaging (a 5sigma depth of 0.2 mJy). This same field of ~40' × 40' is covered in all four IRAC bands as well as the longer wavelength MIPS bands (70 and 160 mum). The r' imaging covers ~0.8 deg2 down to 25.5 mag, and overlaps with most of the MIPS field of view. The J, H, and Ks images cover the cluster core and roughly half of the filament galaxies, which extend toward the neighboring cluster, Abell 1770.

The Source Catalog includes photometry from r', J, H, Ks, IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns, and MIPS 24, 70, and 160 microns images, along with SDSS ugriz and 2MASS JHK photometry.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA399 Dataset

SSC/IRSA

The Enhanced Products consist of two elements:

(1) A collection of 16,986 low-resolution, merged spectra

(2) A Catalog of extracted source positions, synthetic photometry in several bands, PSF profile widths, and other useful quantities.

These products were produced starting with the final SSC pipeline (ver. 18.18) bksub.tbl SL and LL spectra. The bksub.tbl spectra were extracted from the nod two minus nod one and nod one minus nod two background-subtracted basic calibrated data, using an aperture that expands linearly with wavelength. The calibrated fluxes are consequently strictly valid only for point sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA400 Dataset

Taurus team

The Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of the Taurus is a Legacy III project titled, Taurus 2: Finishing the Spitzer Map of the Taurus Molecular Clouds (Taurus). The Taurus Spitzer Legacy project has mapped ≈44 square degrees of the Taurus star-formation region using the IRAC and MIPS cameras aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. In this release, the team provides a bandmerged catalog of 269,358 point sources for the initial 70% of the survey area ("Taurus 1"). Flux densities are reported for the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, and 24 micron bands of IRAC and MIPS. MIPS 70 micron flux densities are also given for a small number of sources. Aperture photometry at three radii is provided for IRAC sources. PSF-fitting photometry is reported for MIPS flux densities.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA401 Dataset

Ashby et al.

The Spitzer Matching Survey of the Ultra-VISTA Deep Stripes (SMUVS) consists of deep 3.6 and 4.5 imaging of three Ultra-VISTA near-infrared survey stripes in the COSMOS field. SMUVS reaches point-source sensitivities of about 25.0 AB mag at both 3.6 and 4.5 microns with a significance of 4 sigma, accounting for both survey sensitivity and source confusion. To this limit, the SMUVS catalogs contain a total of ~350,000 sources, each of which is detected significantly in at least one IRAC band. Because of its uniform and high sensitivity, relatively large area coverage, and the wide array of ancillary data available in COSMOS, the SMUVS survey will be useful for a large number of cosmological investigations.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA402 Dataset

Cygnus-X team

The Cygnus-X region is one of the brightest regions of the sky at all wavelengths and one of the richest known regions of star formation of the Galaxy. The goals of the Cygnus-X survey are to provide a detailed picture of the processes that govern the evolution of massive star forming complexes, to study star formation in the massive star forming complex environment, and to provide a rich sample of intermediate to high mass protostars spanning the full range of protostellar evolution. The project will also allow us to assess the role of feedback in a massive OB star/molecular cloud complex. The survey imaged a ~24 square degree region centered near 20:30:25, +40:00 (J2000). The IRAC images had a median coverage of 3x12s high dynamic range (HDR) frames, and the MIPS data were taken in fast scanning mode in the 24 and 70 μm bands.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA403 Dataset

SpUDS team

SpUDS is a survey of the ~1 square degree UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS). The survey consists of deep IRAC and 24 micron MIPS observations. The UDS is the largest deep near-infrared (JHK) survey in existence, and the first capable of sampling representative cosmological volumes (100x100 Mpc) out to the highest redshifts (z>6).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA404 Dataset

SAGE team

The Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) survey covers the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC; ~7deg×7deg) using the IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 mum) and MIPS (24, 70, and 160 mum) instruments on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. Three key science goals determined the coverage and depth of the survey. The detection of diffuse ISM with column densities >1.2×1021 H cm-2 permits detailed studies of dust processes in the ISM. SAGE's point-source sensitivity enables a complete census of newly formed stars with masses >3 Msolar that will determine the current star formation rate in the LMC. SAGE's detection of evolved stars with mass-loss rates >1×10-8 Msolar yr-1 will quantify the rate at which evolved stars inject mass into the ISM of the LMC. The observing strategy includes two epochs in 2005, separated by 3 months, that both mitigate instrumental artifacts and constrain source variability.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA405 Dataset

GLIMPSE team

The Galactic Legacy Infrared Midplane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) program covered the Galactic plane with the Spitzer IRAC instrument. GLIMPSEI covered 220 sq. degrees at |l|=10d-65d and b=-1d - +1d. GLIMPSEII covered the Galactic Center, l=-10d - +10d. GLIMPSE3D added vertical extensions, typically to |b|<+3d. GLIMPSE360 covered the outer Galaxy (l=65d-265d) with IRAC 3.6 micron and 4.5 micron imaging. The Vela-Carina program covered l=255d-295d.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA406 Dataset

SWIRE Project

* A wide-area, high galactic latitude imaging survey conducted using the Spitzer MIPS far-infrared and IRAC mid-infrared cameras. The satellite data will be complemented by an extensive program of ground-based optical, near-infrared and radio observations.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA407 Dataset

SERVS team

SERVS is a warm Spitzer survey which images approximately 18 square degrees in the centers of the SWIRE XMM-LSS, ELAIS-S1, CDFS, Lockman and ELAIS-N1 fields to 20min (2mu Jy) depth at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. SERVS overlaps with the VISTA-VIDEO near infrared and Herschel-HERMES and SCUBA2-S2CLS far-infrared surveys.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA408 Dataset

CLASH team

The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) is an HST Multi-Cycle Treasury program (PI: Marc Postman) to survey 25 massive galaxy clusters at 16 wavelengths spanning from the near-UV to the near-IR (Postman et al. (2012)). The full HST dataset and associated catalogs and gravitational lens models are available at MAST. A series of programs with Spitzer have covered all CLASH galaxy clusters with IRAC Channels 1 and 2 (3.6 and 4.5 micron). Several of the targets include Channels 3 and 4 (5.8 and 8 micron) data. Spitzer mosaics, catalogs, and PSF images are available at IRSA.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA409 Dataset

Timlin et al. (2016)

The Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES) is a large-area survey of 115 sq. degrees in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field. SpIES achieves 5 sigma depths of 6.13 microJy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 microJy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, respectively.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA410 Dataset

FIDEL team

Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (FIDEL) contains sensitive and extensive far-infrared deep field observations with Spitzer to detect warm dust emission from hundreds of relatively ordinary starburst galaxies and active galactic nuclei at redshifts of 1 to 2 (7 to 10 billion years ago), and thousands more nearby. The survey also detected tens of thousands of high redshift objects at mid-infrared wavelengths. The program obtained data in three fields on the sky. The bulk of the data is in two fields, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) and the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). A smaller amount of additional data was obtained in the GOODS-North area.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA411 Dataset

SSDF team

The Spitzer-South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) is a wide-area survey using IRAC to cover 94 square degrees of extragalactic sky, making it the largest IRAC survey completed to date outside the Milky Way midplane. The SSDF is centered at 23:30,-55:00, in a region that combines observations spanning a broad wavelength range from numerous facilities. These include millimeter imaging from the South Pole Telescope, far-infrared observations from Herschel/SPIRE, X-ray observations from the XMM XXL survey, near-infrared observations from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey, and radio-wavelength imaging from the Australia Telescope Compact Array, in a panchromatic project designed to address major outstanding questions surrounding galaxy clusters and the baryon budget.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA412 Dataset

Bendo et al. (2012)

The MIPS Local Galaxies program compiles the Spitzer MIPS observations of all available galaxies in several Herschel-SPIRE Local Galaxies Guaranteed Time Programs, including the Very Nearby Galaxies Survey (VNGS), Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS), Herschel Reference Survey (HRS), and Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA413 Dataset

Spitzer Science Center

Level 2 or post Basic Calibrated Data (PBCD) from Spitzer Space Telescope. This products come from combining the individual data frames or BCDs [such as mosaics of individual pointings].

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA414 Dataset

LVL team

LVL consists of a sample of 258 galaxies, which have been mapped with both IRAC (4 bands) and MIPS (3 bands). In addition, ancillary data products consisting of images in the narrow-band H-alpha line emission and broad-band R (from the ground) and the UV continuum (2 bands) from GALEX are also available for many of the galaxies.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA415 Dataset

SAFIRES team

The Spitzer Archival FIR Extragalactic Survey (SAFIRES) is an offshoot of the Spitzer Space Telescope Enhanced Imaging Products (SEIP). SAFIRES applies the SEIP project's methods to the remaining two MIPS bands, located at far-infrared wavelengths of 70 and 160 microns. Due to the complexity of far-infrared observations, these bands require an expansion of SEIP's standard pipeline through the addition of reprocessing tools. These additional steps are required to remove obvious artifacts before extracting useful measurements. As a result, these bands were not included in the SEIP project, but were later funded through an additional NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program (ADAP) grant. To ensure high reliability, the SAFIRES sample includes no fields near the Galactic disk; these observations comprised more than half of the area observed by Spitzer, but the practical drawbacks of Galactic contamination would inhibit the ability to maintain the level of reliability desired in the SAFIRES products. As with SEIP, the SAFIRES source lists contains no extended sources. The remaining sample comprises nearly 1132 fields spanning almost 180 square degrees of sky.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA416 Dataset

SDWFS team

The Spitzer Deep Wide-Field Survey is a four-epoch survey of roughly 10 square degrees of the NOAO Deep, Wide-Field Survey field in Boötes. The first visit to the field occurred very early in the Spitzer mission, in 2004 January, as part of the IRAC Shallow Survey (Eisenhardt et al. 2004). Subsequent visits to the field as part of the SDWFS program reimaged the same area to the same depth.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA417 Dataset

Scott et al.

The Spitzer/MIPS 24 and 70 μm imaging of an 11.5 square degree region near the South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) has been carried out in order to complement sub-millimeter wavelength observations (250-500 μm) of the same region of sky taken with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope (BLAST), with the goal of better characterizing the nature of sub-millimeter selected galaxies and their role in galaxy evolution. This field has also been extensively mapped at other wavelengths, and will be imaged from 100-500 μm as part of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA418 Dataset

Labbe et al. (2015)

The IRAC Ultradeep Field (IUDF) combines all ultradeep data ever taken with the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) at 3.6 and 4.5 microns over GOODS-South and the HUDF (+ parallels). The deepest observations come from the IRAC Ultra Deep Field (IUDF, ID 70145, PI Labbe) and IRAC Legacy over GOODS (IGOODS, PID 10076, PI Oesch) programs, combined with archival data from GOODS (PID 194, PI Dickinson), SEDS (PID 60022, PI G. Fazio), S-CANDELS (PID 70204, PI Fazio), ERS (PID 80217, PI Fazio), and UDF2 (PID 30866, PI Bouwens). The combined IRAC images in this data release amount to 1500 hour total integration time, ranging from >50 hour over 150 sq. arcmin, and >100 hour over 60 sq. arcmin, to ~200 hour over 5 - 10 sq. arcmin.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA419 Dataset

Ashby et al. (2015)

The Spitzer-Cosmic Assembly Deep Near-Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (S-CANDELS) is a Spitzer Cycle 8 Exploration Program (PI G. Fazio) that obtained deep IRAC channel 1 and 2 imaging in five widely separated extragalactic fields: the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey (UDS), the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), COSMOS, the HST Deep Field North (HDFN), and the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). S-CANDELS builds upon the existing coverage of these fields obtained as part of the Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS), a Cycle 6 Exploration Program, by increasing the integration time from 12 hours to a total of 50 hours within a smaller area of 0.16 deg2.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA420 Dataset

FLS team

The Spitzer Extragalactic First Look Survey is composed of 4 square degrees of imaging with MIPS and IRAC centered at J1718+5930. Ancillary data are available from a wide variety of optical and radio observatories.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA421 Dataset

C2D team

The c2d Spitzer Legacy project obtained images and photometry with both IRAC and MIPS instruments for five large, nearby molecular clouds. Three of the clouds were also mapped in dust continuum emission at 1.1 mm, and optical spectroscopy has been obtained for some clouds.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA422 Dataset

Rafiei Ravandi et al. (2016)

Spitzer IRAC Observations of the Extended Disk and Halo of M31 (M31 IRAC) covers the major and minor axes of M31 with total lengths of 6.6 and 4.4 degrees, respectively. The M31 IRAC Catalog includes 426,529 sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA423 Dataset

SIMPLE team

SIMPLE consists of deep IRAC observations (several hours per pointing) covering the 0.5 x 0.5 deg area surrounding the GOODS CDF-South. This low-background region of the sky has by far the best supporting data of any cosmological survey field of comparable area, with deep observations from the X-rays to the thermal infrared.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA424 Dataset

SINGS team

The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey is a comprehensive infrared imaging and spectroscopic survey of 75 nearby galaxies. Its primary goal is to characterize the infrared emission of galaxies and their principal infrared-emitting components, across a broad range of galaxy properties and star formation environments. SINGS provides new insights into the physical processes connecting star formation to the interstellar medium properties of galaxies and provides a vital foundation for understanding infrared observations of the distant universe and ultraluminous and active galaxies.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA425 Dataset

S4G team

The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) is a volume-, magnitude-, and size-limited survey of over 2300 nearby galaxies at 3.6 and 4.5μm. This is an extremely deep survey reaching an unprecedented 1σ surface brightness limit of μ3.6μm(AB) = 27 mag arcsec-2. This translates to a stellar surface density of << 1 M⊙ pc-2 ! S4G can thus probe the stellar structure in galaxies in a regime where the gas dominates the stars (typical HI surface density ~ a few M⊙ pc-2).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA426 Dataset

Bradac et al.

The Spitzer Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (SRELICS, PI: Bradac) is the Spitzer counterpart to the RELICS HST Treasury program (PI: Coe) to survey 41 massive galaxy clusters.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA427 Dataset

Papovich et al. (2016)

The Spitzer/HETDEX Exploratory Large-Area (SHELA) survey covers ~24 sq. deg at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. The survey area falls within the footprints of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey "Stripe 82" region, the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX), and the Dark Energy Survey. The images and catalogs are 80% (50%) complete to limiting magnitudes of 22.0 (22.6) AB mag in the detection image, which is constructed from the weighted sum of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 micron images. The catalogs reach limiting sensitivities of 1.1 microJy at both 3.6 and 4.5 microns (1#, for R = 2" circular apertures).

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA428 Dataset

Boyer et al. 2015

DUSTiNGS consists of a sample of 50 dwarf galaxies within 1.5 Mpc, which have been mapped with IRAC channels 1 and 2 (3.6 and 4.5 microns). The sample consists of 37 dwarf spheroidal, 8 dwarf irregular, and 5 transition-type galaxies.

The DUSTiNGS data release includes images and source catalogs based on uniform Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 micron observations.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA429 Dataset

L. Edwards, D. Fadda, A. Biviano, F. Marleau

This data set includes images of the galaxy cluster Abell 1763 at visible and infrared wavelengths: r', J, H, and Ks obtained using the Palomar 200in telescope, as well as the IRAC and MIPS images from Spitzer. The cluster is covered out to approximately 3 virial radii with deep 24 mum imaging (a 5sigma depth of 0.2 mJy). This same field of ~40' × 40' is covered in all four IRAC bands as well as the longer wavelength MIPS bands (70 and 160 mum). The r' imaging covers ~0.8 deg2 down to 25.5 mag, and overlaps with most of the MIPS field of view. The J, H, and Ks images cover the cluster core and roughly half of the filament galaxies, which extend toward the neighboring cluster, Abell 1770.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA430 Dataset

Spitzer Science Center

Level 1 / Basic Calibration Data (BCD) from Spitzer Space Telescope. BCDs are the individual data frames that emerge [calibrated] from the Spitzer pipeline.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA431 Dataset

SAGE-SMC team

The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) provides a unique laboratory for the study of the lifecycle of dust given its low metallicity (~1/5 solar) and relative proximity (~60 kpc). This motivated the SAGE-SMC (Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally Stripped, Low Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud) Spitzer Legacy program with the specific goals of studying the amount and type of dust in the present interstellar medium, the sources of dust in the winds of evolved stars, and how much dust is consumed in star formation. This program mapped the full SMC (30 deg2) including the body, wing, and tail in seven bands from 3.6 to 160 mum using IRAC and MIPS on the Spitzer Space Telescope.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA432 Dataset

GOODS team

The Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) aims to unite extremely deep observations from NASA's Great Observatories (Spitzer, Hubble and Chandra), ESA's Herschel and XMM-Newton, and the most powerful ground-based facilities. The aim is to survey the distant universe to the faintest flux limits across the broadest range of wavelengths.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA433 Dataset

SSC and IRSA

The Spitzer Science Center and IRSA have released a set of Enhanced Imaging Products (SEIP) from the Spitzer Heritage Archive. These include Super Mosaics (combining data from multiple programs where appropriate) and a Source List of photometry for compact sources. The primary requirement on the Source List is very high reliability -- with areal coverage, completeness, and limiting depth being secondary considerations. The SEIP include data from the four channels of IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8 microns) and the 24 micron channel of MIPS. The full set of products for the Spitzer cryogenic mission includes around 42 million sources.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA434 Dataset

Taurus team

The Taurus Spitzer Legacy project has mapped ≈44 square degrees of the Taurus star-formation region using the IRAC and MIPS cameras aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA435 Dataset

MIPSGAL team

MIPSGAL is a survey of the inner 248 square degrees of the Galactic plane at 24 and 70 microns using the MIPS instrument aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The survey covers Galactic latitudes of -1° < b < +1° for Galactic longitudes of l < 62° and l > 298°. Version 3.0 of the MIPSGAL data includes mosaics only at 24um, but covering the entire survey region. |b| < 1° is covered for -68° < l < 69°, and |b| < 3° is covered for -8° < l < 9°.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA436 Dataset

FEPS team

The Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS) Spitzer Legacy program was designed to characterize the evolution of circumstellar gas and dust around solar-type stars between ages of 3 Myr and 3 Gyr. To achieve these goals, FEPS obtained spectrophotometric observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope for a sample of 328 stars. The observing strategy was to measure the spectral energy distribution (SED) between wavelengths of 3.6 and 70 μm with IRAC and MIPS photometry, and between 8 and 35 μm with low-resolution IRS spectra. In addition, the FEPS program obtained MIPS 160 μm photometry for 80 stars to search for colder dust, and high-resolution IRS spectra for 33 sources to probe for circumstellar gas.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA437 Dataset

MUSYC team

The Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC) consists of deep optical medium-band and broadband optical and near-IR imaging of the ~30'x30' Extended Chandra Deep Field South. This field includes the GOODS-South field and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, and covers the same area as the SIMPLE Spitzer Legacy program.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA438 Dataset

MUSYC team

The Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC) consists of deep optical medium-band and broadband optical and near-IR imaging of the ~30'x30' Extended Chandra Deep Field South. This field includes the GOODS-South field and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, and covers the same area as the SIMPLE Spitzer Legacy program.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA439 Dataset

MUSYC team

The Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC) consists of deep optical medium-band and broadband optical and near-IR imaging of the ~30'x30' Extended Chandra Deep Field South. This field includes the GOODS-South field and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, and covers the same area as the SIMPLE Spitzer Legacy program.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA440 Dataset

Kunder et al. (2012)

The Bulge Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA) consists of spectra of approximately 8500 red giants in the Galactic bulge.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA441 Dataset

STScI

The Digitized Sky Survey (DSS) is a ground-based imaging survey of the entire sky in several colors. The survey, performed with Palomar and UK Schmidt telescopes, produced photographic plates that were later digitized at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) to produce the Hubble Guide Stars Catalog (GSC).

Each plate produced by the Survey covers 6.5 x 6.5 degrees of the sky, and the plates have been digitized using a modified PDS microdensitometer. The digital images have a pixel size of either 25 microns (1.7 arcsec per pixel) or 15 microns (1.0 arcsec per pixel), and are 14000 x 14000 or 23040 x 23040 pixels per side. The images are stored on 12-inch optical media and are difficult to access quickly.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA442 Dataset

Planck team

These catalogs contain a list of galaxy clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZ) and consist of candidate sources that were detected using multifrequency algorithms that use the distinct spectral signature of such clusters. This version of the SZ catalogs is a component of Planck Data Release 2.

Three pipelines are used to detect SZ clusters: two independent implementations of the Matched Multi-Filter (MMF1 and MMF3), and PowellSnakes (PwS). The main catalog is the union of the catalogs from the three detection methods. The individual catalogs are provided for the expert user in order to assess the consistency of the pipelines. The union catalogue contains the coordinates and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detections and a summary of the external validation information, including external identification of a cluster and its redshift if it is available.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA443 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA444 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) is a sample of reliable sources, both Galactic and extragalactic, extracted directly from the Planck nominal maps. The first public version of the PCCS, a component of Planck Data Release 1, is derived from the data acquired by Planck between August 13 2009 and November 26 2010. The PCCS consists of nine lists of sources, extracted independently from each of Planck's nine frequency channels. The source lists contain 24 columns per source at the LFI and HFI bands. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA445 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC) is an observational catalogue consisting exclusively of Galactic cold sources. The three highest Planck bands (857, 545, 353 GHz) have been combined with IRAS data at 3 THz to perform a multi-frequency detection of sources colder than their local environment. After rejection of possible extragalactic contaminants, the PGCC catalogue contains 13188 Galactic sources spread across the whole sky, i.e., from the Galactic plane to high latitudes, following the spatial distribution of the main molecular cloud complexes. The median temperature of PGCC sources lies between 13 and 14.5 K, depending on the quality of the flux density measurements, with a temperature ranging from 5.8 to 20 K after removing sources with the 1% largest temperature estimates. Using seven independent methods, reliable distance estimates have been obtained for 5574 sources, which allows the derivation of physical properties such as their mass, physical size, mean density and luminosity.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA446 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA447 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

The PCCS2E catalogs consist of those sources detected in sky regions where the diffuse emission makes it difficult to quantify the reliability of the detections.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA448 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich Cluster catalogs contain a list of galaxy clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZ) and consist of candidate sources that were detected using multifrequency algorithms that use the distinct spectral signature of such clusters. This version of the SZ catalogs, a component of Planck Data Release 1, is derived from the data acquired by Planck between August 13 2009 and November 26 2010.

Three pipelines are used to detect SZ clusters: two independent implementations of the Matched Multi-Filter (MMF1 and MMF3), and PowellSnakes (PwS). The main catalog is constructed as the union of the catalogs from the three detection methods. The individual catalogs are provided for the expert user in order to assess the consistency of the pipelines. The union catalogue contains the coordinates and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detections and a summary of the external validation information, including external identification of a cluster and its redshift if it is available.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA449 Dataset

Planck team

These catalogs contain a list of galaxy clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZ) and consist of candidate sources that were detected using multifrequency algorithms that use the distinct spectral signature of such clusters. This version of the SZ catalogs is a component of Planck Data Release 2.

Three pipelines are used to detect SZ clusters: two independent implementations of the Matched Multi-Filter (MMF1 and MMF3), and PowellSnakes (PwS). The main catalog is the union of the catalogs from the three detection methods. The individual catalogs are provided for the expert user in order to assess the consistency of the pipelines. The union catalogue contains the coordinates and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detections and a summary of the external validation information, including external identification of a cluster and its redshift if it is available.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA450 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) is a sample of reliable sources, both Galactic and extragalactic, extracted directly from the Planck nominal maps. The first public version of the PCCS, a component of Planck Data Release 1, is derived from the data acquired by Planck between August 13 2009 and November 26 2010. The PCCS consists of nine lists of sources, extracted independently from each of Planck's nine frequency channels. The source lists contain 24 columns per source at the LFI and HFI bands. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA451 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

The PCCS2E catalogs consist of those sources detected in sky regions where the diffuse emission makes it difficult to quantify the reliability of the detections.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA452 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

The PCCS2E catalogs consist of those sources detected in sky regions where the diffuse emission makes it difficult to quantify the reliability of the detections.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA453 Dataset

Planck Collaboration

The Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) includes lists of sources detected in each of the Planck bands, as well as the Early Cold Cores (ECC) and the Early Sunyaev-Zeldovich (ESZ) galaxy cluster catalogues. The ERCSC covers the whole sky and has a cumulative reliability of >90%. It contains of order 15000 unique sources spread over the Planck bands, 189 candidate clusters detected through the Sunyaev Zeldovich effect, and 915 cold molecular cloud cores in the Galaxy.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA454 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) is a sample of reliable sources, both Galactic and extragalactic, extracted directly from the Planck nominal maps. The first public version of the PCCS, a component of Planck Data Release 1, is derived from the data acquired by Planck between August 13 2009 and November 26 2010. The PCCS consists of nine lists of sources, extracted independently from each of Planck's nine frequency channels. The source lists contain 24 columns per source at the LFI and HFI bands. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA455 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich Cluster catalogs contain a list of galaxy clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZ) and consist of candidate sources that were detected using multifrequency algorithms that use the distinct spectral signature of such clusters. This version of the SZ catalogs, a component of Planck Data Release 1, is derived from the data acquired by Planck between August 13 2009 and November 26 2010.

Three pipelines are used to detect SZ clusters: two independent implementations of the Matched Multi-Filter (MMF1 and MMF3), and PowellSnakes (PwS). The main catalog is constructed as the union of the catalogs from the three detection methods. The individual catalogs are provided for the expert user in order to assess the consistency of the pipelines. The union catalogue contains the coordinates and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detections and a summary of the external validation information, including external identification of a cluster and its redshift if it is available.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA456 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA457 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) is a sample of reliable sources, both Galactic and extragalactic, extracted directly from the Planck nominal maps. The first public version of the PCCS, a component of Planck Data Release 1, is derived from the data acquired by Planck between August 13 2009 and November 26 2010. The PCCS consists of nine lists of sources, extracted independently from each of Planck's nine frequency channels. The source lists contain 24 columns per source at the LFI and HFI bands. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA458 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA459 Dataset

Planck team

These catalogs contain a list of galaxy clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZ) and consist of candidate sources that were detected using multifrequency algorithms that use the distinct spectral signature of such clusters. This version of the SZ catalogs is a component of Planck Data Release 2.

Three pipelines are used to detect SZ clusters: two independent implementations of the Matched Multi-Filter (MMF1 and MMF3), and PowellSnakes (PwS). The main catalog is the union of the catalogs from the three detection methods. The individual catalogs are provided for the expert user in order to assess the consistency of the pipelines. The union catalogue contains the coordinates and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detections and a summary of the external validation information, including external identification of a cluster and its redshift if it is available.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA460 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) is a sample of reliable sources, both Galactic and extragalactic, extracted directly from the Planck nominal maps. The first public version of the PCCS, a component of Planck Data Release 1, is derived from the data acquired by Planck between August 13 2009 and November 26 2010. The PCCS consists of nine lists of sources, extracted independently from each of Planck's nine frequency channels. The source lists contain 24 columns per source at the LFI and HFI bands. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA461 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

The PCCS2E catalogs consist of those sources detected in sky regions where the diffuse emission makes it difficult to quantify the reliability of the detections.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA462 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA463 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) is a sample of reliable sources, both Galactic and extragalactic, extracted directly from the Planck nominal maps. The first public version of the PCCS, a component of Planck Data Release 1, is derived from the data acquired by Planck between August 13 2009 and November 26 2010. The PCCS consists of nine lists of sources, extracted independently from each of Planck's nine frequency channels. The source lists contain 24 columns per source at the LFI and HFI bands. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA464 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA465 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) is a sample of reliable sources, both Galactic and extragalactic, extracted directly from the Planck nominal maps. The first public version of the PCCS, a component of Planck Data Release 1, is derived from the data acquired by Planck between August 13 2009 and November 26 2010. The PCCS consists of nine lists of sources, extracted independently from each of Planck's nine frequency channels. The source lists contain 24 columns per source at the LFI and HFI bands. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA466 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA467 Dataset

Planck team

These catalogs contain a list of galaxy clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZ) and consist of candidate sources that were detected using multifrequency algorithms that use the distinct spectral signature of such clusters. This version of the SZ catalogs is a component of Planck Data Release 2.

Three pipelines are used to detect SZ clusters: two independent implementations of the Matched Multi-Filter (MMF1 and MMF3), and PowellSnakes (PwS). The main catalog is the union of the catalogs from the three detection methods. The individual catalogs are provided for the expert user in order to assess the consistency of the pipelines. The union catalogue contains the coordinates and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detections and a summary of the external validation information, including external identification of a cluster and its redshift if it is available.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA468 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck list of high-redshift source candidates (PHZ) is a list of 2151 sources located in the cleanest 26% of the sky and identified as point sources exhibiting an excess in the submillimeter compared to their environment. It has been built using the 48 months Planck data at 857, 545, 353 and 217 GHz combined with the 3 THz IRAS data, as it is described in Planck-2015-XXXIX. These sources are considered as high-z source candidates (z>1.5-2), given the very low contamination by Galactic cirrus, and their typical colour-colour ratio. A subsample of the PHZ list has already been followed-up with Herschel, and chararcterized as overdensities of red galaxies for more than 93% of the population, and as strongly lensed galaxies in 3% of the cases, as detailed in Planck-2014-XXVIII.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA469 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) is a sample of reliable sources, both Galactic and extragalactic, extracted directly from the Planck nominal maps. The first public version of the PCCS, a component of Planck Data Release 1, is derived from the data acquired by Planck between August 13 2009 and November 26 2010. The PCCS consists of nine lists of sources, extracted independently from each of Planck's nine frequency channels. The source lists contain 24 columns per source at the LFI and HFI bands. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA470 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA471 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich Cluster catalogs contain a list of galaxy clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZ) and consist of candidate sources that were detected using multifrequency algorithms that use the distinct spectral signature of such clusters. This version of the SZ catalogs, a component of Planck Data Release 1, is derived from the data acquired by Planck between August 13 2009 and November 26 2010.

Three pipelines are used to detect SZ clusters: two independent implementations of the Matched Multi-Filter (MMF1 and MMF3), and PowellSnakes (PwS). The main catalog is constructed as the union of the catalogs from the three detection methods. The individual catalogs are provided for the expert user in order to assess the consistency of the pipelines. The union catalogue contains the coordinates and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detections and a summary of the external validation information, including external identification of a cluster and its redshift if it is available.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA472 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) includes nine lists of highly reliable sources, individually extracted at each of the nine Planck frequency channels. To facilitate the study of the Planck sources, especially their spectral behaviour across the radio/infrared frequencies, Chen et al. (2016) provide a `bandmerged' catalogue of the ERCSC sources. This catalogue consists of 15,191 entries, with 79 sources detected in all nine frequency channels of Planck and 6818 sources detected in only one channel.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA473 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) is a sample of reliable sources, both Galactic and extragalactic, extracted directly from the Planck nominal maps. The first public version of the PCCS, a component of Planck Data Release 1, is derived from the data acquired by Planck between August 13 2009 and November 26 2010. The PCCS consists of nine lists of sources, extracted independently from each of Planck's nine frequency channels. The source lists contain 24 columns per source at the LFI and HFI bands. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA474 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA475 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

The PCCS2E catalogs consist of those sources detected in sky regions where the diffuse emission makes it difficult to quantify the reliability of the detections.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA476 Dataset

Planck team

The Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich Cluster catalogs contain a list of galaxy clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZ) and consist of candidate sources that were detected using multifrequency algorithms that use the distinct spectral signature of such clusters. This version of the SZ catalogs, a component of Planck Data Release 1, is derived from the data acquired by Planck between August 13 2009 and November 26 2010.

Three pipelines are used to detect SZ clusters: two independent implementations of the Matched Multi-Filter (MMF1 and MMF3), and PowellSnakes (PwS). The main catalog is constructed as the union of the catalogs from the three detection methods. The individual catalogs are provided for the expert user in order to assess the consistency of the pipelines. The union catalogue contains the coordinates and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detections and a summary of the external validation information, including external identification of a cluster and its redshift if it is available.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA477 Dataset

Planck team

The second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) is a set of single-frequency source catalogues extracted from the Planck full-mission maps in intensity and polarization. The 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz catalogs include polarization measurements. The 857 GHz source list has six additional columns which give the flux densities and flux density uncertainties at the three adjacent lower frequencies: 217, 353, and 545 GHz.

The PCCS2E catalogs consist of those sources detected in sky regions where the diffuse emission makes it difficult to quantify the reliability of the detections.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA478 Dataset

DENIS team

This data release, from 2005 September, consists of 355,220,325 point sources detected by DENIS. The release contains 3662 strips, each of which is 30 degrees long in Declination and 12 arcmin wide in Right Ascension (with an overlap of 2 arcminutes between consecutive strips), and covers approximately 16,700 square degrees of the southern sky. The northernmost declination covered is ~+02d07m and the southernmost is ~-87d37m. Multiple detections of single point sources have been merged in image overlaps within individual strips, but sources can have multiple detections in overlapping strips. DENIS observations began at the end of 1995 and were completed on 09 September 2001.

The survey was conducted simultaneously in three bands: one optical band (Gunn-i at 0.82um, hereafter referred to as "I") and two near-infrared bands (J at 1.25um and Ks at 2.15um), with limiting magnitudes of 18.5 mag, 16.5 mag, and 14.0 mag and saturation magnitudes of 9.8 mag, 7.5 mag, and 6 mag at I, J, and Ks, respectively. Documentation at CDS states that the astrometric accuracy of a typical point source is better than 1 arcsec and photometric accuracy is better than 0.1 mag, although the range of SNR over which these apply is not specified. DENIS was conducted by a European consortium using the 1m telescope at the European Southern Observatory in La Silla, Chile.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA479 Dataset

Bolocam GPS team

The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 mm continuum survey of the Galactic Plane made using Bolocam on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Millimeter-wavelength thermal dust emission reveals the repositories of the densest molecular gas, ranging in scale from cores to whole clouds. By pinpointing these regions, the connection of this gas to nascent and ongoing star formation may be explored. The BGPS coverage totals 170 square degrees (with 33" FWHM effective resolution). The survey is contiguous over the range -10.5 ≤ l ≤ 90.5, |b| ≤ 0.5. Towards the Cygnus X spiral arm, the coverage was flared to |b| ≤ 1.5 for 75.5 ≤ l ≤ 87.5. In addition, cross-cuts to |b| ≤ 1.5 were made at l = 3, 15, 30 and 31. The total area of this section is 133 square degrees. With the exception of the increase in latitude, no pre-selection criteria were applied to the coverage in this region. In addition to the contiguous region, four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy were observed: IC1396 (9 square degrees, 97.5 ≤ l ≤ 100.5, 2.25 ≤ l ≤ 5.25), a region towards the Perseus Arm (4 square degrees centered on l = 111, b=0 near NGC7538), W3/4/5 (18 square degrees, 132.5 ≤ l ≤ 138.5) and Gem OB1 (6 square degrees, 187.5 ≤ l ≤ 193.5). The survey has detected approximately 8,400 sources, to an rms noise level in the maps ranging from 30 to 60 mJy beam-1. The BGPS survey and catalog provide an important database for sub/millimeter observations with the Herschel Space Observatory, ALMA, SCUBA-2, APEX, and others.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA480 Dataset

Bolocam GPS team

The Version 2 release (hereafter v2) of the BGPS data includes images and a catalog. It is described in Ginsburg et al (2013).

The new images have improved fidelity and more uniform noise. The fields include all those in the original v1 release and some new data. There are new fields included in the BGPS v2 release, primarily in the outer galaxy but including some expansions in the inner galaxy. These include M17, IRAS 22172, a significant expansion in l and b around the l=110 region, Mon R2, NGC 2264, parts of the Orion A and B clouds, Sharpless 235, and scattered IRAS+CO selected fields at longitude 119, 123, 126, 129, 154, 169, 181, 182, 195, 201, and 217. IRSA provides a coverage map.

There is a new catalog associated with the v2 images. The sources were extracted using Bolocat with parameters set in the same way as for the v1 catalog. There are many sources in v1 that are not in v2 and vice-versa. These discrepancies occur primarily for faint sources with low signal-to-noise. Objects in both catalogs are likely to be real since catalog parameters were selected to minimize false positives. Changing the quality of the images and the structure of the noise highlights some new objects and obscures others. The v2 catalog has about a 75% overlap with the v1 catalog. The differences are explored in more detail in the Ginsburg et al (2013).

The flux calibration offset identified in the version 1 data is now understood. The version 2 data are brighter, on average, by approximately a factor 1.5, but the factor varies from source to source. The v2 catalog should be used instead of the v1 catalog. The source of the error was the incorrect application of a flux calibration solution.

Contreras et al (2013) noted a 4.7 arcsecond offset between the BGPS v1 catalog and the ATLASGAL catalog. We believe this is caused by an offset of that magnitude (~3-4 arcseconds) in a few fields that have an inordinate number of sources extracted; the pointing accuracy in the vast majority of the BGPS fields, based on a comparison to Herschel Hi-Gal images, is better than 4 arcseconds, but the mean offset is within 2 arcseconds of zero.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA481 Dataset

Bolocam GPS team

The Version 2 release (hereafter v2) of the BGPS data includes images and a catalog. It is described in Ginsburg et al (2013).

The new images have improved fidelity and more uniform noise. The fields include all those in the original v1 release and some new data. There are new fields included in the BGPS v2 release, primarily in the outer galaxy but including some expansions in the inner galaxy. These include M17, IRAS 22172, a significant expansion in l and b around the l=110 region, Mon R2, NGC 2264, parts of the Orion A and B clouds, Sharpless 235, and scattered IRAS+CO selected fields at longitude 119, 123, 126, 129, 154, 169, 181, 182, 195, 201, and 217. IRSA provides a coverage map.

There is a new catalog associated with the v2 images. The sources were extracted using Bolocat with parameters set in the same way as for the v1 catalog. There are many sources in v1 that are not in v2 and vice-versa. These discrepancies occur primarily for faint sources with low signal-to-noise. Objects in both catalogs are likely to be real since catalog parameters were selected to minimize false positives. Changing the quality of the images and the structure of the noise highlights some new objects and obscures others. The v2 catalog has about a 75% overlap with the v1 catalog. The differences are explored in more detail in the Ginsburg et al (2013).

The flux calibration offset identified in the version 1 data is now understood. The version 2 data are brighter, on average, by approximately a factor 1.5, but the factor varies from source to source. The v2 catalog should be used instead of the v1 catalog. The source of the error was the incorrect application of a flux calibration solution.

Contreras et al (2013) noted a 4.7 arcsecond offset between the BGPS v1 catalog and the ATLASGAL catalog. We believe this is caused by an offset of that magnitude (~3-4 arcseconds) in a few fields that have an inordinate number of sources extracted; the pointing accuracy in the vast majority of the BGPS fields, based on a comparison to Herschel Hi-Gal images, is better than 4 arcseconds, but the mean offset is within 2 arcseconds of zero.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26131/IRSA482 Dataset

Bolocam GPS team

The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 mm continuum survey of the Galactic Plane made using Bolocam on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Millimeter-wavelength thermal dust emission reveals the repositories of the densest molecular gas, ranging in scale from cores to whole clouds. By pinpointing these regions, the connection of this gas to nascent and ongoing star formation may be explored. The BGPS coverage totals 170 square degrees (with 33" FWHM effective resolution). The survey is contiguous over the range -10.5 ≤ l ≤ 90.5, |b| ≤ 0.5. Towards the Cygnus X spiral arm, the coverage was flared to |b| ≤ 1.5 for 75.5 ≤ l ≤ 87.5. In addition, cross-cuts to |b| ≤ 1.5 were made at l = 3, 15, 30 and 31. The total area of this section is 133 square degrees. With the exception of the increase in latitude, no pre-selection criteria were applied to the coverage in this region. In addition to the contiguous region, four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy were observed: IC1396 (9 square degrees, 97.5 ≤ l ≤ 100.5, 2.25 ≤ l ≤ 5.25), a region towards the Perseus Arm (4 square degrees centered on l = 111, b=0 near NGC7538), W3/4/5 (18 square degrees, 132.5 ≤ l ≤ 138.5) and Gem OB1 (6 square degrees, 187.5 ≤ l ≤ 193.5). The survey has detected approximately 8,400 sources, to an rms noise level in the maps ranging from 30 to 60 mJy beam-1. The BGPS survey and catalog provide an important database for sub/millimeter observations with the Herschel Space Observatory, ALMA, SCUBA-2, APEX, and others.

This dataset or service is made available by the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA) at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

11 DOIs

10.26133/NEA1 Dataset

NASA Exoplanet Archive

The Confirmed Planets table contains physical and orbital parameters for the planet and the host star, as available from the default literature reference for each planet.


10.26133/NEA2 Dataset

NASA Exoplanet Archive

The Composite Planet Data table provides a collection of stellar and planetary parameters for confirmed exoplanets, one row per planet. The table automatically selects the data from other available literature references for the same planet to fill in gaps from the default literature reference.


10.26133/NEA3 Dataset

NASA Exoplanet Archive

The K2 candidates table lists objects from the published literature identified as candidates or false positives. If objects are confirmed as planets, their status in this table is updated but the objects remain.


10.26133/NEA4 Dataset

NASA Exoplanet Archive

The Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) cumulative table gathers information from the individual KOI activity tables that describe the current results of different searches of the Kepler light curves. The intent of the cumulative table is to provide the most accurate dispositions and stellar and planetary information for all KOIs in one place. All the information in this table has provenance in other KOI activity tables.


10.26133/NEA5 Dataset

Kepler Mission

The Q1–Q17 Data Release 25 (DR25) Supplemental Kepler Objects-of-Interest (KOI) activity table reports dispositions based on the final processing (DR25) of the Kepler data and a combination of automated and human-based vetting to produce a "best-knowledge" catalog of planetary CANDIDATEs and FALSE POSITIVEs for use by the Astronomical community in selecting KOIs for follow-up observations and further study.

This dataset or service is made available by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26133/NEA6 Dataset

Kepler Mission

The Kepler Stellar interactive table contains parameters for all targets observed by Kepler for the purpose of finding transiting planets. Individual tables include the values used for that specific processing, including the Q1-12, Q1-16, Q1-17 DR 24, and Q1-17 DR 25 pipeline runs. One additional table, the Q1-17 DR 25 Supplemental Stellar, includes values provided by the Kepler Stellar Properties Working Group (SPWG) independent of any pipeline processing in order to report their most current stellar values.

This dataset or service is made available by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26133/NEA7 Dataset

UKIRT Microlensing Team

Light curves from the ongoing UKIRT microlensing survey made available with help from the UKIRT Microlensing Team.The Wide Field Camera (WFCAM) on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT), located at Mauna Kea Observatory, has been used to conduct microlensing surveys with a variety of science goals.

This dataset or service is made available by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26133/NEA8 Dataset

KELT Team

The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) survey consists of two robotic telescopes that are conducting a survey for transiting exoplanets around bright stars. The NASA Exoplanet Archive currently contains about 1.1 million light curves in selected Northern fields.

This dataset or service is made available by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26133/NEA9 Dataset

SuperWASP Consortium

SuperWASP consists of two robotic observatories that operate continuously throughout the year, allowing coverage of both hemispheres of the sky. The first, SuperWASP-North, is located on the island of La Palma among the Isaac Newton Group (ING) of telescopes. The second, SuperWASP-South, is located at the site of the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO), just outside Sutherland, South Africa. The NASA Exoplanet Archive hosts over 18 million light curves collected between 2004 and 2008.

This dataset or service is made available by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26133/NEA10 Dataset

NASA Exoplanet Archive

The transmission spectroscopy table contains wavelength-dependent transit measurements from the published literature. The transit measurements are published as either transit depths, planet-to-star radius ratios, or planet radii, and span wavelengths 0.3-24 microns.

This dataset or service is made available by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26133/NEA11 Dataset

NASA Exoplanet Archive

The emission spectroscopy table contains wavelength-dependent eclipse measurements from the published literature. The eclipse measurements are published as either eclipse depths or brightness temperature, and span wavelengths 0.65-24 microns.

This dataset or service is made available by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

7 DOIs

10.26132/NED1 Service

NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED)

NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) is a comprehensive database of multiwavelength data for extragalactic objects, providing a systematic, ongoing fusion of information integrated from hundreds of large sky surveys and hundreds of thousands of research publications. The contents and services span the entire observed spectrum from gamma rays through radio frequencies. As new observations are published, they are cross-identified or statistically associated with previous data and integrated into a unified database to simplify queries and retrieval.


10.26132/NED2 Service

NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED)

Thousands of acronyms are used in NED. This service provides the list of acronyms and their definitions and further information links.


10.26132/NED3 Service

NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED)

The NED GWF service facilitates searches for electromagnetic (EM) counterparts to gravitational wave (GW) events. Within minutes after the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)-Virgo collaboration issues an alert using the Gamma-ray Coordinates Network (GCN) operated by the NASA GSFC (https://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/), this NED service responds by cross-matching in 3D the event's HEALPix map with galaxies in the local Universe and the following results are provided: an all-sky image of the probability contours, the location of all galaxies in NED within the LIGO 90% probability volume, and the top 20 galaxies sorted by 2MASS absolute Ks-band magnitude.


10.26132/NED4 Service

NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED)

The NED coordinate calculator provides conversions among different coordinate systems: equatorial, ecliptic, galactic, and supergalactic.


10.26132/NED5 Service

NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED)

The NED extinction calculator returns the foreground Galactic extinction at an input position using the Schlafly & Finkbeiner 2011 (ApJ 737, 103, 2011) recalibration of the Schlegel, Finkbeiner & Davis 1998 (ApJ 500, 525, 1998; SFD98) extinction map. The original SFD98 extinction values are also returned for comparison purposes.


10.26132/NED6 Collection

NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED)

LEVEL5 provides a curated collection of review articles and important references of current and lasting interest to extragalactic astronomers and cosmologists. Individual extragalactic objects discussed in the text are cross-linked to data in NED, and citations are linked to abstracts and bibliographic information in the NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS).


10.26132/NED7 Text

NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED)

The article provides an overview of challenges encountered in ongoing efforts to improve the automation, efficiency, and accuracy of the procedures required to extract, transform, cross-identify, and integrate data from the electronic astrophysics literature into the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED). Recommendations for best practices for publishing data are provided, from the perspective of the NED Team, to serve as a reference guide for authors, referees and editors of astrophysics journal articles.

4 DOIs

10.26134/ExoFOP1 Service

ExoFOP

The Exoplanet Follow-up Observing Program (ExoFOP) website is designed to optimize resources and facilitate collaboration in follow-up studies of exoplanet candidates. ExoFOP-Kepler serves as a repository for community-gathered follow-up data on Kepler planet candidates by allowing upload and display of data and derived astrophysical parameters.

This dataset or service is made available by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26134/ExoFOP2 Service

ExoFOP

The Exoplanet Follow-up Observing Program (ExoFOP) website is designed to optimize resources and facilitate collaboration in follow-up studies of exoplanet candidates. ExoFOP-K2 serves as a repository for community-gathered follow-up data on K2 planet candidates by allowing upload and display of data and derived astrophysical parameters.

This dataset or service is made available by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26134/ExoFOP3 Service

ExoFOP

The Exoplanet Follow-up Observing Program (ExoFOP) website is designed to optimize resources and facilitate collaboration in follow-up studies of exoplanet candidates. ExoFOP-TESS serves as a repository for community-gathered follow-up data on TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite) planet candidates by allowing upload and display of data and derived astrophysical parameters.

This dataset or service is made available by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


10.26134/ExoFOP4 Dataset • 1.0 • 05 May 2019

G. B. Berriman, J. C. Good, J. L. Christiansen, B. Holwerda.

This dataset or service is made available by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute at IPAC, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.