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Legacy

Since 1985, IPAC has provided science operations expertise to enable transformative space and ground-based observational programs. Historically, IPAC has provided leadership in expanding exploration of the infrared universe, and continues to curate data from programs such as ISO, 2MASS, IRAS, and WISE through IRSA today. Explore the legacy of IPAC's work on these programs below.

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2MASS

The Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) is a near-infrared digital imaging survey of the entire sky conducted by the University of Massachusetts and IPAC at 1.25, 1.65 and 2.17 microns. A pair of matched 1.3-m diameter telescopes (Arizona and Chile) completed survey operations in early 2001. Data processing and product development continued through 2003. Key science goals of the survey include the large-scale structure of the Milky Way and the Local Universe, an accurate census of stars in the solar neighborhood, and the discovery of new brown dwarfs and active galactic nuclei.

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IRAS

For ten months in 1983, the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), a joint project of the US, UK and the Netherlands, scanned more than 96 percent of the sky. The IRAS mission performed an unbiased, sensitive all sky survey at 12, 25, 60 and 100 ┬Ám. This path-breaking infrared satellite doubled the number of known astronomical sources and made numerous important scientific advances. IRAS discoveries included a disk of dust grains around the star Vega, six new comets, and very strong infrared emission from interacting galaxies as well as wisps of warm dust called infrared cirrus which could be found in almost every direction of space. IRAS also revealed for the first time the core of our galaxy, the Milky Way. Archival research with IRAS data continues nearly 20 years after this historic mission.

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ISO

The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) was launched by ESA in late 1995 and operated for 30 months before the cryogen was exhausted. ISO carried a cooled 60-cm telescope and four science instruments which conducted nearly 30,000 observations at wavelengths between 2.5 and 240 microns. Subsequent processing and analysis of data continued through 2001. ISO has left a rich treasure of scientific results, ranging from the Solar System to galaxies in the distant Universe. ISO data are available through IRSA for archival research by the entire science community.

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WISE

The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) provides an all-sky survey from 3 to 25 microns which is up to 500 times more sensitive than the IRAS survey. WISE's goals were to find the most luminous galaxies in the Universe, the closest stars to the Sun, detect most main belt asteroids larger than 3 km, and extend the 2MASS survey into the thermal infrared. WISE enables a wide variety of studies ranging from the evolution of protoplanetary debris discs to the history of star formation in normal galaxies. WISE has provided an infrared atlas whose legacy will endure for decades. WISE launched on 14 December 2009. In early October 2010, after completing its prime science mission, the spacecraft ran out of coolant that keeps its instrumentation cold. However, two of its four infrared cameras remained operational. These two channels were still useful for asteroid hunting, so NASA extended the NEOWISE portion of the WISE mission by four months, with the primary purpose of hunting for more asteroids and comets, and to finish one complete scan of the main asteroid belt. After the completion of this phase, WISE was placed in hibernation-mode. In September 2013, WISE was revived with the goal of discovering and characterizing near-Earth objects (NEOs), space rocks orbiting within 28 million miles (45 million kilometers) from Earth's path around the sun. NASA anticipates WISE will use its 16-inch (40-centimeter) telescope and infrared cameras to discover about 150 previously unknown NEOs and characterize the size, albedo and thermal properties of about 2,000 others -- including some which could be candidates for the agency's recently announced asteroid initiative.

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